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Budget Build for Planetside 2 and 1080p streaming

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July 29, 2013 7:07:23 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: End of August/Early September

Budget Range: $1100, hard-ish cap. Additionally I have a $75 debit card that I can use to purchase one item (most likely the case or RAM).

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming (Especially Planetside 2), high school and college tasks, video livestreaming at 1080p.

Are you buying a monitor: Yes

Parts to Upgrade: I need basically an entirely new build. Can you use a wireless USB/mouse to install Windows for the first time? I have a mouse and keyboard for those old circular port things, but they're covered in a lot of dust.

Do you need to buy OS: Yes
Please note that if you're using an OEM license of Windows, you will need a new one when buying a new motherboard.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: (e.g.: newegg.com, ncix.com -- to show us selection & pricing) No real preference.

Location: City, State/Region, Country - Brooklyn, New York, United States.

Parts Preferences: Preferably Intel and nVidia. I love AMD's 8-cores, but I prefer not having to overclock right out of the box just to get 30 fps. 1tb at the very least, 2tb preferable.

Overclocking: Yes, but not anytime soon.

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe, but not in this current budget please.

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080.

Additional Comments: Would you guys do me a huge favor and do two builds, one with an i5-4670k and one with an i7-4770k?

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: I'm an incoming high school senior, and I need to purchase a computer that will win me bragging rights in high school (haha, just kidding!) and be able to run games in the future. Not exactly looking for ultra settings in Crysis 5, or even 3 for that matter, but at least playable fps. (40fps for shooters, 30 elsewhere)

I know you guys tend to persuade people against getting an i7, especially with the budget I have. However, after experiencing the letdown with the "no game will ever use two cores" and then C2D becomes outdated in 2 years dilemma, I rather stay safe and cheap out on the part that most people upgrade before their CPU, the GPU. Also, I can transfer the old GPU to an older backup rig (hehe, guess the CPU on it) which you can't do with an i5-4670k. Also, I heard that streaming with an i5-4670k will only net 720p before it starts to impact performance too much. The virtual cores on the i7 SHOULD help with the 1080p streaming a lot.

Also, I have had to use Autodesk Inventor and MultiSim in the past, which took a lot of power from the CPU. I'm trying to stay safe because using my old rig to play with MultiSim was not fun.

Oh and if you don't have enough space for a monitor (like, adding a 1080p monitor will throw the budget off by $50), then leave it out. I can always just use the old one. I know this budget and the two builds are tall orders to fill, but I hope you guys can do it! Thanks!
July 29, 2013 7:18:40 PM

bowen159 said:
Approximate Purchase Date: End of August/Early September

Budget Range: $1100, hard-ish cap. Additionally I have a $75 debit card that I can use to purchase one item (most likely the case or RAM).

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming (Especially Planetside 2), high school and college tasks, video livestreaming at 1080p.

Are you buying a monitor: Yes

Parts to Upgrade: I need basically an entirely new build. Can you use a wireless USB/mouse to install Windows for the first time? I have a mouse and keyboard for those old circular port things, but they're covered in a lot of dust.

Do you need to buy OS: Yes
Please note that if you're using an OEM license of Windows, you will need a new one when buying a new motherboard.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: (e.g.: newegg.com, ncix.com -- to show us selection & pricing) No real preference.

Location: City, State/Region, Country - Brooklyn, New York, United States.

Parts Preferences: Preferably Intel and nVidia. I love AMD's 8-cores, but I prefer not having to overclock right out of the box just to get 30 fps. 1tb at the very least, 2tb preferable.

Overclocking: Yes, but not anytime soon.

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe, but not in this current budget please.

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080.

Additional Comments: Would you guys do me a huge favor and do two builds, one with an i5-4670k and one with an i7-4770k?

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: I'm an incoming high school senior, and I need to purchase a computer that will win me bragging rights in high school (haha, just kidding!) and be able to run games in the future. Not exactly looking for ultra settings in Crysis 5, or even 3 for that matter, but at least playable fps. (40fps for shooters, 30 elsewhere)

I know you guys tend to persuade people against getting an i7, especially with the budget I have. However, after experiencing the letdown with the "no game will ever use two cores" and then C2D becomes outdated in 2 years dilemma, I rather stay safe and cheap out on the part that most people upgrade before their CPU, the GPU. Also, I can transfer the old GPU to an older backup rig (hehe, guess the CPU on it) which you can't do with an i5-4670k. Also, I heard that streaming with an i5-4670k will only net 720p before it starts to impact performance too much. The virtual cores on the i7 SHOULD help with the 1080p streaming a lot.

Also, I have had to use Autodesk Inventor and MultiSim in the past, which took a lot of power from the CPU. I'm trying to stay safe because using my old rig to play with MultiSim was not fun.

Oh and if you don't have enough space for a monitor (like, adding a 1080p monitor will throw the budget off by $50), then leave it out. I can always just use the old one. I know this budget and the two builds are tall orders to fill, but I hope you guys can do it! Thanks!


This should do nicely if you can spare another $100. You can switch out the mobo for a more advanced on if you like (the Z87-A is the 'lowest-end' mobo from ASUS's channel line. Still a very respectable mobo. Z87 will leave you room to OC in the future, and trust me, you will).

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($279.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($85.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Define XL R2 (Black Pearl) ATX Full Tower Case ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 Professional (OEM) (64-bit) ($129.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1245.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-29 22:16 EDT-0400)

Notes:
The i7 is better for content creation but an i5 clocked at 4 GHz+ should do very nice for streaming. 4 GHz is really easy to reach nowadays.
The H80 is a really darn thick radiator, so you might have some clearance issues in the Define XL (that's the whole point of getting the XL vs the normal one. Same price, though).
Air Cooling can also be a really nice solution and can save you lots of moolah. I prefer water cooling, so I put in the H80i.
July 29, 2013 7:48:01 PM

I don't think you can beat this.
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ma7H
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ma7H/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ma7H/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($293.97 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G41 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($85.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($35.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($35.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($298.50 @ Newegg)
Case: BitFenix Merc Alpha (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($37.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS95 DVD/CD Writer ($14.94 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.73 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1118.11
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-29 22:47 EDT-0400)
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July 29, 2013 7:52:58 PM

Shawna593767 said:
I don't think you can beat this.
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ma7H
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ma7H/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ma7H/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($293.97 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G41 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($85.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($35.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($35.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($298.50 @ Newegg)
Case: BitFenix Merc Alpha (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($37.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS95 DVD/CD Writer ($14.94 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.73 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1118.11
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-29 22:47 EDT-0400)

Very respectable rig, but:
The 2600K is still really nice for gaming, but Z78 packs a lot of future-proof features and connectivity that Z77 doesn't. Also, I'm giving him (arguably) better RAM (side note: never buy 2 kits of RAM, they will have compatibility weirdness) for a cheaper price (~$100 compared to $70). The PSU is arguably better, but more efficient. A CX600 might not have enough on the 12V rail to run a 7970, but a better option than a 760. The 2600K won't last long though, with Broadwell coming next year (maybe), as it'll be 3 generations old by then. Also, who needs a optical drive anymore?
July 29, 2013 8:00:56 PM

Try 2:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1mamZ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1mamZ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1mamZ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($249.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($114.98 @ Outlet PC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($56.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($298.50 @ Newegg)
Case: BitFenix Merc Alpha (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($29.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 650W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.73 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1110.13
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-29 23:00 EDT-0400)
July 29, 2013 8:02:05 PM

Managed to upgrade and save money. Not as NEW as some other builds, but it will pull through anything you want it to.
July 29, 2013 9:23:51 PM

Shawna593767 said:
Managed to upgrade and save money. Not as NEW as some other builds, but it will pull through anything you want it to.


I have a few questions about that build, well more like question-request hybrids-
1) Why Ivy Bridge and not Haswell? The sleeping/hibernating thing that Haswell uses sounds like something I'd use a lot of. Right now, I tend to leave my computer on overnight if I left some work for tomorrow to complete. Does Haswell only help with hibernating, or sleeping as well? (Haha, as well, Haswell. No? Ok I'll stop)
2) Why did you recommend a Xigmatek cooler in particular? Also, after-market coolers aren't a must-have right now, because I only intend to overclock when I need the extra speed. An i7 ought to have enough juice for a year or two without touching the clock.
3) Can you trade back the 7970 for the GTX 760? I would love to use an AMD Card, but I'd be willing to trade 3% of overall performance for the Physx flashes in Planetside. Yes, I'm a sucker for the flashy effects.
4) The BitFenix case seems too bland and I'm not too sure about where the front grill is. Is it that tiny thing on the bottom? I've been looking at a Zalman Z11 Plus case recently, could you advise me on something of that sort? With a visible front fan, and a little visual effect here or there? It definitely doesn't have to be like a NZXT Phantom kind of flashiness, but a little flare would spice things up.
5) Can you guys also build a complete i5 build?

I've been toying with pcpartpicker right after I posted this thread, not thinking that it would get 6 posts right after I posted it. Oops.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1mbu8 -i7 (Edited version of the build Shawna posted)
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1mbT6 -i5 (eugh I know it can definitely be better here)

By the way guys, thank you so much for helping me :D 

Best solution

July 29, 2013 9:34:24 PM
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bowen159 said:
Shawna593767 said:
Managed to upgrade and save money. Not as NEW as some other builds, but it will pull through anything you want it to.


I have a few questions about that build, well more like question-request hybrids-
1) Why Ivy Bridge and not Haswell? The sleeping/hibernating thing that Haswell uses sounds like something I'd use a lot of. Right now, I tend to leave my computer on overnight if I left some work for tomorrow to complete. Does Haswell only help with hibernating, or sleeping as well? (Haha, as well, Haswell. No? Ok I'll stop)
2) Why did you recommend a Xigmatek cooler in particular? Also, after-market coolers aren't a must-have right now, because I only intend to overclock when I need the extra speed. An i7 ought to have enough juice for a year or two without touching the clock.
3) Can you trade back the 7970 for the GTX 760? I would love to use an AMD Card, but I'd be willing to trade 3% of overall performance for the Physx flashes in Planetside. Yes, I'm a sucker for the flashy effects.
4) The BitFenix case seems too bland and I'm not too sure about where the front grill is. Is it that tiny thing on the bottom? I've been looking at a Zalman Z11 Plus case recently, could you advise me on something of that sort? With a visible front fan, and a little visual effect here or there? It definitely doesn't have to be like a NZXT Phantom kind of flashiness, but a little flare would spice things up.
5) Can you guys also build a complete i5 build?

I've been toying with pcpartpicker right after I posted this thread, not thinking that it would get 6 posts right after I posted it. Oops.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1mbu8 -i7 (Edited version of the build Shawna posted)
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1mbT6 -i5 (eugh I know it can definitely be better here)

By the way guys, thank you so much for helping me :D 


1) Ivy Bridge vs. Haswell is really a preference game. The performance difference is negligible. Where Haswell really shines is power consumption. One main reason you should get Haswell is because of Z87. It's an awesome chipset with some awesome features.
2) Probably his personal preference. You can go with the reference cooler and invest more in the GPU if you want.
3) My build used a GTX 760. It's at the bottom should you want to check the specs.
4) My advice is to get yourself a Corsair or Fractal Design case. Thermaltake and Cooler Master have nice cases too. I bought the Corsair 600T recently, which looks great and is great, but I prefer Fractal Design's design (pun intended) because I like the minimalistic styling. I've never owned one of their cases but I've heard good things about them.
5) Simply change the CPU from an i7 K model to an i5 K model of the same socket and you're done :) 

Here's my build again if you needed it. It should run most things you throw at it pretty well.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($279.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H80i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Z87-A ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($85.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Fractal Design Define XL R2 (Black Pearl) ATX Full Tower Case ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 Professional (OEM) (64-bit) ($129.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1245.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-07-29 22:16 EDT-0400)
August 1, 2013 3:57:05 PM

So sorry I didn't respond for two days!

Anyways, does the power supply have to be that expensive? I was thinking of something like the Corsair builder series, or one of those lower end Antecs. Do I really need 850W?

Also, I most likely won't need to buy a cooling solution just yet. I mean, an i7 on stock would be able to run basically anything right now, and with very acceptable fps. Could you shift the cost of the H80i over to some other parts? Possibly a monitor?

One last question, does that mobo overclock well?
August 1, 2013 7:25:59 PM

bowen159 said:
So sorry I didn't respond for two days!

Anyways, does the power supply have to be that expensive? I was thinking of something like the Corsair builder series, or one of those lower end Antecs. Do I really need 850W?

Also, I most likely won't need to buy a cooling solution just yet. I mean, an i7 on stock would be able to run basically anything right now, and with very acceptable fps. Could you shift the cost of the H80i over to some other parts? Possibly a monitor?

One last question, does that mobo overclock well?


The power supply does have to that expensive. Never, ever go for cheap power supplies (talking about power supplies from non-reputable brands etc.). As far as getting a CX series PSU, I wouldn't. A high-end build like this needs clean, stable power. It's not to say that the CX series isn't good, just that when you end up squeezing more performance out of your system, a CX series won't cut it.

850w is not needed but I'd guess you'd need about 650w with everything plugged in. 850w will give you headroom for overclocking, as well as more than enough power under load.

Intel stock coolers are fine, but if you're building a PC, especially one for gaming and editing, the first thing you should do with the stock cooler is:
*cue drumroll*
Toss it out the window.
While the stock heatsink is fine, you should always get a aftermarket cooler. 99% of the time they perform better, give you overclocking headroom, and are anywhere from 10-20 degrees cooler. (usually) the colder your CPU stays, the longer it lives.
And, please, don't tell me you won't overclock. When you get a high-end machine, overclocking is part of the package. It's so easy to push 4 GHz and greater, and you get a performance boost in almost every program, including games.

As for the mobo OC'ing, I would think it'd give you at least 4.2 GHz, maybe more. You could always swap out a more expensive part for a better mobo or RAM (in content creation, 16GB+ RAM is a must, but you can get off with less).

One more thing: Don't measure the performance of a CPU or CPU cooler in fps. A CPU is rarely the decisive factor in games, especially for i7s and i5s. The most difference you'll see is 1-2 fps, and in more CPU heavy games, maybe 5-7 fps between the two processors. The way you should sum up a CPU is not in game performance, but in computation performance and encoding, etc (usually measured in FLOPS). If a CPU (Haswell is around this rating) is rated for 1.81 teraflops, then its compute performance is very nice. I don't know about previous generations, but they perform very nicely as well. Haswell just punches through FLOPS, though, because it supports the AVX2.1 instruction set.
If you measure CPU coolers in fps difference, you will end up buying the cheapest cooler there is and have your system run terribly. CPU coolers should be measured in temperature. For instance, the H100i drives a 3770K to about 30C when idle, and around 50-55C under load. The stock cooler would probably run it around 40C idle and in the high 80s low 90s under load. See the difference?
August 18, 2013 8:47:30 PM

I finally got most of the parts shipped, and made a trip to Microcenter for the CPU, Mobo, and RAM. The only things I changed were the Mobo (got an Asrock Z87 Extreme4 because it was 30 dollars cheaper), RAM (again, cheaper but same specs), and the tower (just got a regular Define R4 because of size constraints). Thanks for your help!
!