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How to idealy set up a SSD + HDD combo ?

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August 1, 2013 4:37:35 AM

Hy guys....
I dont know much about RAID or AHCI or IDE :D 
So i have a 5 year old 1TB WD HDD , 7200 RPM , 16 mb buffer SATA 1
and a SSD samsung 840 pro 128 gb SATA III.
My motherboard is the Z87-UD5H

How should i set this up ideally ? i have no idea...
August 1, 2013 4:49:36 AM

What are you really asking here? What should you do with thoes cards? Take the cards and insert them into your PC, after that connect them with the according cables.

Install your OS be it windows linux or whatever on the SSD and leave the rest like it is.
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August 1, 2013 4:51:24 AM

Alex Leyzar said:
Hy guys....
I dont know much about RAID or AHCI or IDE :D 
So i have a 5 year old 1TB WD HDD , 7200 RPM , 16 mb buffer SATA 1
and a SSD samsung 840 pro 128 gb SATA III.
My motherboard is the Z87-UD5H

How should i set this up ideally ? i have no idea...


There is nothing much to setup since you have different disks. Install your Operating System on the SSD and stuff that you frequent use and use the HDD as a storage disk.
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a b G Storage
August 1, 2013 4:51:28 AM

Alex Leyzar said:
Hy guys....
I dont know much about RAID or AHCI or IDE :D 
So i have a 5 year old 1TB WD HDD , 7200 RPM , 16 mb buffer SATA 1
and a SSD samsung 840 pro 128 gb SATA III.
My motherboard is the Z87-UD5H

How should i set this up ideally ? i have no idea...


Connect the SSD to the SATA3 that comes from the chip set

in your mobo the black ones ... (6 total they come from Z87 chipset)

and dont use MarvellĀ® 88SE9230 Sata for anything speedy , just use it for DVD and so drives ,

Install your system on the SSD , including the programs and the games you play most , not all of them or it will be full.

when you save a file , save it on the SSD when you work , once you finish working and it is ready move it to the mechanical disk to save space .

and keep in mind , NEVER fill SSD more than 70% allways keep 30% free space .. otherwise the speed will go down very quickly .

and put the windows page file on the SSD as well ... it should be double your memory size :) 

thats all and if your harddisk is 5 years old , dont put any important DATA on it , it will die soon , and if you test it you will find alot of bad sectors on it :) 

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August 1, 2013 5:03:11 AM

Ok, thank you, so by any chance you wouldn't happen to know if i should use ahci or raid ? it is still unclear to me what raid dose.... rly
Also i read something about creating a partition on the SSD so that i can catch the HDD ? ..

P.S. i ran crystaldisk on my old HDD and its fine ....
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a b G Storage
August 1, 2013 5:08:05 AM

Alex Leyzar said:
Ok, thank you, so by any chance you wouldn't happen to know if i should use ahci or raid ? it is still unclear to me what raid dose.... rly
Also i read something about creating a partition on the SSD so that i can catch the HDD ? ..

P.S. i ran crystaldisk on my old HDD and its fine ....


What Crystal Disk ? you need to check it for bad sectors ..

for raid you will need 2 or more identical drives ..
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August 1, 2013 5:12:45 AM

Alex Leyzar said:
Ok, thank you, so by any chance you wouldn't happen to know if i should use ahci or raid ? it is still unclear to me what raid dose.... rly
Also i read something about creating a partition on the SSD so that i can catch the HDD ? ..

P.S. i ran crystaldisk on my old HDD and its fine ....


AHCI is a technology that improves your read and write speeds. Its a simple on/off switch found in bios.
Now RAID is used when you have identical disks... something that you don't. So don't worry about it. What you have will work just fine.
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Best solution

a c 99 G Storage
August 1, 2013 5:16:41 AM

RAID = Redundant Array of Inexpensive/Independant Disk's
Its basically ways of setting up multiple HDD's to protect your data in case of drive failure. For what your doing, its not a concern. Your looking at a JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disk's) array.

Plug your SSD in (without the HDD plugged in), install Windows. Plug the HDD in, Initialize and format. You should have C: drive (the SSD) and D: (or whatever you named it) drive which is your HDD.
When your installing things, make sure they go to the right place. Stuff like Chrome, Microsoft Office and important programs like those, on the SSD. Stuff like movies, files, games and unimportant programs, on the HDD.
This might help.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMo8krAJd5Q

With a 128GB drive, wouldn't bother sacrificing a portion of it to cache the HDD.
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a b G Storage
August 1, 2013 7:02:33 AM

manofchalk said:
RAID = Redundant Array of Inexpensive/Independant Disk's
Its basically ways of setting up multiple HDD's to protect your data in case of drive failure. For what your doing, its not a concern. Your looking at a JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disk's) array.

Plug your SSD in (without the HDD plugged in), install Windows. Plug the HDD in, Initialize and format. You should have C: drive (the SSD) and D: (or whatever you named it) drive which is your HDD.
When your installing things, make sure they go to the right place. Stuff like Chrome, Microsoft Office and important programs like those, on the SSD. Stuff like movies, files, games and unimportant programs, on the HDD.
This might help.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMo8krAJd5Q

With a 128GB drive, wouldn't bother sacrificing a portion of it to cache the HDD.


I am going to nitpick a little here about this otherwise excellent answer. RAID is not a solution for data protection. It is a great solution for redundancy. The only solution that works for data protection is a backup.
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a c 99 G Storage
August 1, 2013 7:06:57 AM

It can be both, RAID1 allows data protection (against drive failure only) and redundancy, in that you can just pull out the dead drive and keep going instantly.
But yes, I suppose the main benefit of most RAID levels is that you can keep going if any one (or more, depending on the level and number of disks) drive fails.
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a b G Storage
August 1, 2013 7:36:51 AM

lol I gave him the most important answer , not to fill the SSD more than 70% , and told him most of the moderators said , and detailed for him how to plug it on his chipset Sata3 and yet I dont get best answer lol... and told him about the page files ..

what did he say I didnot ? even I explained more .... pfffffft
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August 1, 2013 11:24:20 PM

SNA3 said:
lol I gave him the most important answer , not to fill the SSD more than 70% , and told him most of the moderators said , and detailed for him how to plug it on his chipset Sata3 and yet I dont get best answer lol... and told him about the page files ..

what did he say I didnot ? even I explained more .... pfffffft




You also need a avatar with a happy thumbs up guy probably. It keeps the OP's mood up about you.

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a c 99 G Storage
August 2, 2013 1:19:20 AM

Hadn't even considered that about my avatar...
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December 19, 2013 1:53:09 PM

hopefully im in the right thread. my apologies if im not.. fairly new here.. posting at least

ok so a little bit more info on something would help me out a lot
I am setting up a new computer for audio production.. I wanted a similar set up as far as storage = 1 x 250GB ssd + ? x 1TB hdd?

haven't decided on how much extra space I need but I kinda feel like 250GB is where I want to be as far as my initial drive..
id be on windows 7 or 8?? depends on which is better for multi screen / touchscreen.
No internet tho I might want to have a hardline capability when I need it and just take it out when I don't
i'd be working with a DAW (fl studio reason protools )
and lots VST's and WAVs and various other file formats (saved in folders that can get pretty big in size over relatively short periods of time)..
and at any given time there can be multiple tracks running these often times quite demanding VST plugins and pulling sometimes large WAVs from lots of different folders which basically equates to high cpu usage
on top of that I will also be saving a lot of projects and sound clips and renderings and what nots..

in a set up like this, do I...

1. set up my OS on ssd
2. set up DAW on ssd
*? 3. set up VSTs WAVs on ssd or hdd *?
4. save projects etc. to hdd

or scrap this setup idea and go with one of your more efficient experienced tried and true setup ideas that im sure one of you kind folk can lend a young wet behind the ears fella like myself

*? = where I get confused *?
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March 15, 2014 11:00:07 PM

RAID is an acronym that describes different ways that data can be stored in a balance between safety and efficiency. You may see references to RAID levels. They are, as follows:

RAID-0:
No protection. If a disk fails, I hope you had a backup.

RAID-1:
All data written to one disk is automatically copied to a second disk. Wastes a disk, but complete protection as long as you don't have both disks in a pair fail.

RAID-3:
Several disks contain data, and one disk contains "parity". Parity allows any one disk to fail and the data can be recreated 100% by the data on the other disks. If two disks fail, you are screwed. Example of parity. You tell three friends to pick a number from 1-10, and then you will pick you number so that the total number ends with "0". Your friends pick 2, 5, and 9, so you pick 4 since 2+5+9+4 = 20. Then your "9" friend is shot by a sniper. Since the remaining numbers (2,5,4) add up to 11, you know your missing friend had 9 because 11+9 = 20.

RAID-5:
In RAID-3, the parity disk has to work extra hard because any time a disk changes, the parity disk has to make a corresponding change. This will make the parity disk wear out faster. So, RAID-5 is just like RAID-3, except the parity work is shared across all disks.

RAID-6:
Kind of like RAID-5 except there are two parity disks. This means that two separate disks can fail simultaneously and you are still a-ok, as long as you recreate the missing data before a third disk fails. This is ideal for larger corporate-type setups.

There are RAID-2, 4, and 10, but I don't hear about them much. If you really care, wikipedia.


If you wanted to do this, you obviously need several hard disks. The logic I described can be handled by software (cheap) or hardware (fast).


Source: use to work for a company that manufactured RAID storage arrays (several years ago).

Edit: lost text in cut and paste; fixed
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July 21, 2014 5:17:17 PM

12222193,0,1521141 said:


1. set up my OS on ssd
2. set up DAW on ssd
*? 3. set up VSTs WAVs on ssd or hdd *?
4. save projects etc. to hdd


Set up your OS and DAW on ssd for sure. If you are playing external instruments and need to worry about latency then save those projects on the ssd. You will be amazed at the reduction in latency you get from using an ssd. Store old projects on your hdd.

I have the same setup as you. I use internet to update drivers and software only. I only have ssd now though because of how great they work for DAWs.
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