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[4 quick questions] 3570k Air Cooled 4.4ghz Overclock

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nuW1

4 Questions:

1. Can a Hype 212 keep a 3570k cooled around 4.4 ghz overclock? Not really looking to push past that, just want a little more out of my 1st PC. All the forums I've read conclude something to the effect of water cooling is for 4.4g ghz and higher but just wanted a double check.

2. Curious if I need this expensive of a mother board to hit 4.4 ghz.

3. Site has it estimated at 365w, but when overclocked will a 450w power supply be enough?

4. Also, can anyone look to see if this is a solid ram/video/cpu/mobo build for me?

Thanks!
34 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about quick questions 3570k air cooled 4ghz overclock
  1. Yes. So can the considerably cheaper Xigmatek Gaia, which cools within 1C of the Hyper212 EVO but is up to 6db quieter and ~$10 cheaper.
  2. Seems solid, although 16GB and 2133MHz speeds are pointless, especially since they are CAS 11, get some CAS 9 1866Mhz RAM of 8GB or 16GB(only if you REALLY want that much, it will not be used easily) instead.

    I would suggest ONE change. Drop to a little cheaper mobo and get a higher wattage PSU just for that little extra headroom, or you may run into trouble when OCing. You do not really want to run PSUs at high capacity for long periods of time. A decent 550W is perfectly fine.

    The 212 SHOULD be fine for 4.4GHz, its not really a definite thing, but MOST likely.
  3. my suggestion :

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nvmE
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nvmE/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nvmE/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
    CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($149.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($136.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($259.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Microcenter)
    Power Supply: Cooler Master Silent Pro M2 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($46.00 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.23 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.73 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $1053.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-02 16:11 EDT-0400)
  4. I can't see PCPartPicker lists at work any more, so I really can't offer too much more. From what I've seen in other threads, you may rely on Novuake's suggestions; differences I'm likely to have most likely fit into the category of niggles. If you're going to overclock though, make sure the mobo you get has decent VRMs, with heatsinks on them.
  5. Novuake said:
    Seems solid, although 16GB and 2133MHz speeds are pointless, especially since they are CAS 11, get some CAS 9 1866Mhz RAM of 8GB or 16GB(only if you REALLY want that much, it will not be used easily) instead.

    I would suggest ONE change. Drop to a little cheaper mobo and get a higher wattage PSU just for that little extra headroom, or you may run into trouble when OCing. You do not really want to run PSUs at high capacity for long periods of time. A decent 550W is perfectly fine.

    The 212 SHOULD be fine for 4.4GHz, its not really a definite thing, but MOST likely.


    1. The thought process behind the ram: filtered by the 1.5v supported by intel chip, and then by price. The 2133ghz was like a dollar more so I clicked on it. Is there a performance gain using CAS9 1866mhz over CAS11 2133ghz? If so I'll of course go with that! (I do gaming, but light amounts of video editing and photoshop)

    2. I swapped out the power supply to a 550w gold Sea Sonic.

    3. Any suggestions for a slightly beefier heat sink? I don't mind dropping another $20-40 to ensure I don't burn out a $220 chip (prematurely)
  6. Fluxvolta said:

    1. The thought process behind the ram: filtered by the 1.5v supported by intel chip, and then by price. The 2133ghz was like a dollar more so I clicked on it. Is there a performance gain using CAS9 1866mhz over CAS11 2133ghz? If so I'll of course go with that! (I do gaming, but light amounts of video editing and photoshop)

    2. I swapped out the power supply to a 550w gold Sea Sonic.

    3. Any suggestions for a slightly beefier heat sink? I don't mind dropping another $20-40 to ensure I don't burn out a $220 chip (prematurely)



    I prefer a balance of CAS vs Frequency, but to be honest, frequancy wins out in most cases from a performance perspective, however on Z77/Z87, higher frequency LITERALLY means nothing other than in synthetics. So yeah, balance is again looking good. :D

    As for a beefier heatsink. Noctua NH-D14 is one of the most popular ones at its price.
    Its on promo at Amazon too.
    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002VKVZ1A/?tag=pcpapi-20
  7. Novuake said:
    my suggestion :

    PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nvmE
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nvmE/by_merchant/
    Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nvmE/benchmarks/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
    CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($149.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($136.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($259.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ Microcenter)
    Power Supply: Cooler Master Silent Pro M2 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($46.00 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.23 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.73 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $1053.88
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-02 16:11 EDT-0400)

    1. I had that mobo in my 1st build because it has the OC Genie 2 button on the board. (lazy overclocker...which I definitely am^^)

    2. Is a 256g SSD for $180 worth having?
    3. Should I bump up the video card at all? I could go up another $50-70 if need be.
  8. Onus said:
    I can't see PCPartPicker lists at work any more, so I really can't offer too much more. From what I've seen in other threads, you may rely on Novuake's suggestions; differences I'm likely to have most likely fit into the category of niggles. If you're going to overclock though, make sure the mobo you get has decent VRMs, with heatsinks on them.


    Thanks! :D

    MSI usually hold back on decent VRMs, but the GD65 Gaming board is one of the exceptions. G43/G45 on the other hand. :no:

    Not sure about the G45 Gaming one specifically though, have not seen any decent testing done on it yet.
  9. Fluxvolta said:

    1. I had that mobo in my 1st build because it has the OC Genie 2 button on the board. (lazy overclocker...which I definitely am^^)

    2. Is a 256g SSD for $180 worth having?
    3. Should I bump up the video card at all? I could go up another $50-70 if need be.


    1. LOL BIOS OCing is suggested and ALWAYS safer and better.
    2. UHM SSDs are great and once you get used to them, you can not go back. If you have the cash, yes, if you are not sure, hold off on it.
    3. Nah, don't bump to GTX770, its 100$ diff which could be better spent on an SSD. At least thats my reasoning since the GTX760 presents SUCH amazing value and can ofcourse be SLI'd later.
  10. Novuake said:
    Fluxvolta said:

    1. I had that mobo in my 1st build because it has the OC Genie 2 button on the board. (lazy overclocker...which I definitely am^^)

    2. Is a 256g SSD for $180 worth having?
    3. Should I bump up the video card at all? I could go up another $50-70 if need be.


    1. LOL BIOS OCing is suggested and ALWAYS safer and better.
    2. UHM SSDs are great and once you get used to them, you can not go back. If you have the cash, yes, if you are not sure, hold off on it.
    3. Nah, don't bump to GTX770, its 100$ diff which could be better spent on an SSD. At least thats my reasoning since the GTX760 presents SUCH amazing value and can ofcourse be SLI'd later.


    Ok, I'll go watch some tutorials on bios oc'n. lol

    As for Ram, I have it at 1866mhz cas9 1.5v Gskill, but only 8gigz of it, should I be at 16gigz? (my frame of reference is just bad: Mac Pro 16 gigz of 1066mhz, I don't feel any love from it)
  11. The MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming motherboard is one sweet board. I got sent one to review, and the only reason I didn't put it in my primary system is because that's in a m-ATX case, and this board is ATX. So, it's going to remain my test board for now, but it's also (still) doing a little BTC mining.
    I'm not sure a much better air cooler can be had for $60. The Xigmatek Dark Knight I believe is a slightly larger model than the Gaia, but I'm not sure it cools notably better. The $60 Thermaltake Frio is a better cooler though, but I couldn't tell you if it's $40 better.
  12. HardOCP did a good review of the GD65 Gaming also. With voltage increases, they got some good OCs. I don't push voltage when I OC, so I think I just went to 4.2GHz and was happy.
    Throughout my testing, I'd aim an IR thermometer at the VRMs from time to time, and they always stayed pretty cool; max maybe 38C? I think it was generally less though.
    Cheap MSI boards, expecially the AMD ones (e.g. -G43) are NOTORIOUS for VRMs that pop under load. I was very pleasantly surprised.
  13. Fluxvolta said:

    Ok, I'll go watch some tutorials on bios oc'n. lol

    As for Ram, I have it at 1866mhz cas9 1.5v Gskill, but only 8gigz of it, should I be at 16gigz? (my frame of reference is just bad: Mac Pro 16 gigz of 1066mhz, I don't feel any love from it)


    Well get 8GB and see what your usage is like. If needed, get another set of the same type of RAM. As simple as that.

    I got some previous threads on OCing here, but each chip is different. Just ask once you have the board, and I/we will help.
  14. Onus said:
    HardOCP did a good review of the GD65 Gaming also. With voltage increases, they got some good OCs. I don't push voltage when I OC, so I think I just went to 4.2GHz and was happy.
    Throughout my testing, I'd aim an IR thermometer at the VRMs from time to time, and they always stayed pretty cool; max maybe 38C? I think it was generally less though.
    Cheap MSI boards, expecially the AMD ones (e.g. -G43) are NOTORIOUS for VRMs that pop under load. I was very pleasantly surprised.


    The Z77 G43 was just as bad from personal experience. ANY voltage increase would make voltages iratic and temps go up.... SEND ME THAT IR Thermometer!!!!! just can not find one here.(well not at acceptable prices)
  15. Onus said:
    The MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming motherboard is one sweet board. I got sent one to review, and the only reason I didn't put it in my primary system is because that's in a m-ATX case, and this board is ATX. So, it's going to remain my test board for now, but it's also (still) doing a little BTC mining.
    I'm not sure a much better air cooler can be had for $60. The Xigmatek Dark Knight I believe is a slightly larger model than the Gaia, but I'm not sure it cools notably better. The $60 Thermaltake Frio is a better cooler though, but I couldn't tell you if it's $40 better.


    I was about to buy all this stuff but my cousin is busting my chops about my video card. Can the 760 be overclocked and if so, what's it's equivalent to: 780? I guess I can go another $100-150 on the video card.
  16. Best answer
    Fluxvolta said:

    I was about to buy all this stuff but my cousin is busting my chops about my video card. Can the 760 be overclocked and if so, what's it's equivalent to: 780? I guess I can go another $100-150 on the video card.


    GK104 really does not OC well.

    techpowerup used a round up of GTX760 and averaged them out to about a 12% gain in BF3. Which is not much, BF3 is VERY clock sensitive, so most games will get a lot smaller gain from OCing. Keep in mind these are "BEST CASE SCENARIO OCing", with GPUs mostly sent by the competing companies, your bought GPU sample may not get anywhere close to this kind of performance gain.

    Still also does not come close to a GTX780.


    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_760/30.html
  17. Yes, but overclocking is highly variable; no two chips will OC the same, and there are no guarantees. You might consider single GTX770 though; I think they're around $400 here.
  18. Onus said:
    Yes, but overclocking is highly variable; no two chips will OC the same, and there are no guarantees. You might consider single GTX770 though; I think they're around $400 here.


    Jip THIS, but once again, SLI in the near future would be a better option if you were to get a 750-850w PSU now.
  19. Novuake said:
    Onus said:
    Yes, but overclocking is highly variable; no two chips will OC the same, and there are no guarantees. You might consider single GTX770 though; I think they're around $400 here.


    Jip THIS, but once again, SLI in the near future would be a better option if you were to get a 750-850w PSU now.


    2nd thought, after looking at that whole benchmark and thinking about my current comp vs. needs... I don't think I game enough to spend above $250 on a graphics card. I've been playing wow forever, photoshop cs4, imovie, and office programs on my 2.66ghz mac pro that has 16gigz of 1066mhz ram on a dog hard drive. The mac pro has been slowing down so I need a new comp.

    I think a 4.4ghz overclock with 8gig ram, and the 760 card will stomp the hell out of my tasks, and at $1,067, I can live with that.
  20. Novuake said:
    Fluxvolta said:

    I was about to buy all this stuff but my cousin is busting my chops about my video card. Can the 760 be overclocked and if so, what's it's equivalent to: 780? I guess I can go another $100-150 on the video card.


    GK104 really does not OC well.

    techpowerup used a round up of GTX760 and averaged them out to about a 12% gain in BF3. Which is not much, BF3 is VERY clock sensitive, so most games will get a lot smaller gain from OCing. Keep in mind these are "BEST CASE SCENARIO OCing", with GPUs mostly sent by the competing companies, your bought GPU sample may not get anywhere close to this kind of performance gain.

    Still also does not come close to a GTX780.


    http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_760/30.html



    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nvHD

    Thanks for your help on the build. I'll hit you up when all the parts come in and I'm ready to OC. =)
  21. Fluxvolta said:
    Novuake said:
    Onus said:
    Yes, but overclocking is highly variable; no two chips will OC the same, and there are no guarantees. You might consider single GTX770 though; I think they're around $400 here.


    Jip THIS, but once again, SLI in the near future would be a better option if you were to get a 750-850w PSU now.


    2nd thought, after looking at that whole benchmark and thinking about my current comp vs. needs... I don't think I game enough to spend above $250 on a graphics card. I've been playing wow forever, photoshop cs4, imovie, and office programs on my 2.66ghz mac pro that has 16gigz of 1066mhz ram on a dog hard drive. The mac pro has been slowing down so I need a new comp.

    I think a 4.4ghz overclock with 8gig ram, and the 760 card will stomp the hell out of my tasks, and at $1,067, I can live with that.


    My sentiments exactly.
  22. No problem! THEN the fun begins...
  23. Makes a lot of sense. Turning a setting or two down is no big loss. Really, of all the computer parts I didn't really need over the years, high-powered graphics cards top the list. My only consolation about the HD7970 is that I bought it to mine for a while, and if I cashed out now it would be like I paid <$200 for it; that's hard to beat no matter how you look at it.
  24. Onus said:
    Makes a lot of sense. Turning a setting or two down is no big loss. Really, of all the computer parts I didn't really need over the years, high-powered graphics cards top the list. My only consolation about the HD7970 is that I bought it to mine for a while, and if I cashed out now it would be like I paid <$200 for it; that's hard to beat no matter how you look at it.


    A friend brought up something interesting about buying 3770k build: a beast for my tasks, but I could do this near identical build on Haswell platform ($40 difference) but I'll have the motherboard so when new CPUs come out I'll be able swap them in.

    Worth it?

    Ivy Bridge
    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nYNP

    Haswell Build
    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1nZMK
  25. First off, the Haswell 1150 refresh will not be worth upgrading to, so that will not be a deciding factor.
    As for the performance difference, AT MOST 7% in SYNTHETICS, nothing for gaming or general use that you will feel.
    The 3570K does however overclock a lot better in general.
    The Z87 chipset does provide a little more USB3 and SATA3 connectivity natively though.

    Its really a toss-up, will be the same thing at the end of the day.
  26. Haswell might be ~10% faster in some things, but as Novauke points out, it's more visible in synthetics than in actual use. Ivy Bridge also overclocks better, so the differences could conceivably allow it to catch up.
    If you intend to overclock, particularly a lot, Ivy Bridge should perform as well or maybe better than Haswell. If you don't care so much about overclocking (none, up to perhaps 4.1GHz or so), get Haswell, for two specific advantages. For one, despite the higher TDP, it may actually use less power. The big difference though is in the chipset. Z77 boards have only two native Intel SATA 6Gb/s ports; others are added by slower 3rd party controllers and can't be RAIDed with the Intel ports. Z87 boards, otoh, have at least four all-Intel controlled SATA 6Gb/s ports. Since the boot drive should be on an Intel port for maximum performance, that rules out a SATA 6Gb/s RAID1 for your data on a Z77 board.
  27. Onus said:
    Haswell might be ~10% faster in some things, but as Novauke points out, it's more visible in synthetics than in actual use. Ivy Bridge also overclocks better, so the differences could conceivably allow it to catch up.
    If you intend to overclock, particularly a lot, Ivy Bridge should perform as well or maybe better than Haswell. If you don't care so much about overclocking (none, up to perhaps 4.1GHz or so), get Haswell, for two specific advantages. For one, despite the higher TDP, it may actually use less power. The big difference though is in the chipset. Z77 boards have only two native Intel SATA 6Gb/s ports; others are added by slower 3rd party controllers and can't be RAIDed with the Intel ports. Z87 boards, otoh, have at least four all-Intel controlled SATA 6Gb/s ports. Since the boot drive should be on an Intel port for maximum performance, that rules out a SATA 6Gb/s RAID1 for your data on a Z77 board.

    I tend to buy a new computer every 3 years or so and I was looking for a stable 24/7 overclock around 4.4ghz that would hopefully last that long. I never actually add or upgrade along the way so the SSD, HDD, and Asus Blu Ray are the only things I intend on plugging into this machine. But was reserving the option just in case the next processor in the Haswell series was just stellar.
  28. If you want a 4.4GHz overclock, I think you'll be a lot more likely to hit that with manageable temps using IB than Haswell. I've got a couple of OCing boards (Asus Maximus V Gene and MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming), and neither will hit that without bumping voltage, which I prefer not to do at all, but IB probably could manage that without any more than the mid-range cooling I use (Xigmatek Gaia).
  29. Onus said:
    If you want a 4.4GHz overclock, I think you'll be a lot more likely to hit that with manageable temps using IB than Haswell. I've got a couple of OCing boards (Asus Maximus V Gene and MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming), and neither will hit that without bumping voltage, which I prefer not to do at all, but IB probably could manage that without any more than the mid-range cooling I use (Xigmatek Gaia).


    Generally 4.2GHz is possible at stock volts, but 4.4Ghz, not often, sometimes you get lucky though.
  30. Yeah, I've run both at 4.2GHz on stock volts without heat issues.
  31. Novuake said:
    Onus said:
    If you want a 4.4GHz overclock, I think you'll be a lot more likely to hit that with manageable temps using IB than Haswell. I've got a couple of OCing boards (Asus Maximus V Gene and MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming), and neither will hit that without bumping voltage, which I prefer not to do at all, but IB probably could manage that without any more than the mid-range cooling I use (Xigmatek Gaia).


    Generally 4.2GHz is possible at stock volts, but 4.4Ghz, not often, sometimes you get lucky though.


    If I'm looking at more of a 4.2ghz range, and no adjustment to voltage, can I scale any parts down: mobo/powersupply/fan?
  32. You could scale the fan back down to the Xigmatek Gaia; that will shave over $50 from the price.
    I'm not at all a fan of CM anything, but that looks like a good deal on one of their very few PSUs that doesn't review [very] poorly, so I'm not sure you'll save much there.
    As to the mobo, you're getting a lot there, but you might look at an ASRock Extreme4 if you just want to save some money. A lot of people have gotten good results with it, although its VRMs are not as good as on the MSI.
  33. i have my 3570k at 4.6 ghz in turbo and prime never passes 78c after a few hours.....gaming? barely ever hits 68c.

    this is at 1.192 vcore and a hyper 212 one fan =)

    so yes it ocs well, my chip anyway
  34. There was a sale on Haswell chips today (3570k too but out of stock) so I impulse bought, and bought, and bought, and bought...
    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1oJFH

    ...I could have shaved off another $120 but timing on the processor wasn't timing on the other parts. lol

    +$30 on SSD (missed sale by 1 day)
    +$40 on Windows 8 Pro (wtf, didn't have Windows 8 and I gotztabuild)
    +$30 on different water cooler: Kraken x60 to H110
    +$20 on different brand of GTX 760

    I was really bummed about the Kraken. I saw a few several reviews stating it was 1st for lowest dbs water cooler, but also 1st or 2nd for cooling.

    Building & testing tonight, but gotta love Fry's 30-day no questions asked return policy. So still have a chance to move price point on a few items, and/or beef up other parts.
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