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Buying new PCs and adding video cards to them

Last response: in Components
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August 5, 2013 11:48:12 AM

I've noticed that a lot of the time, a non-gaming PC from manufacturers like HP or Dell will include an i5 or i7 processor (along with integrated graphics).

The price of the PC is often lower than buying the processor, motherboard, and RAM, case and OEM Windows.

So pretty much all you have to do is switch out the power supply and add a video card to get a gaming PC that is cheaper than what you could get by buying each part seperately.
a b U Graphics card
August 5, 2013 11:53:57 AM

What is ur budget ??

It would be good if u give specific model no.
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August 5, 2013 11:57:39 AM

a lot of times those cases aren't big enough for a full size gpu card
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a b U Graphics card
August 5, 2013 12:03:37 PM

jcurry23 said:
a lot of times those cases aren't big enough for a full size gpu card


However a lot of cards aren't full size, like the Asus GTX 670 mini.

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a b U Graphics card
August 5, 2013 12:05:16 PM

You cannot Over Clock HP computers.
-Bruce
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August 5, 2013 12:08:56 PM

then that is the only card that he will be able to buy
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a b U Graphics card
August 5, 2013 12:10:28 PM

With that lower price comes limitations.

New PSU, new graphics card, cooling solutions, overclockability, case size...

Why pay for parts twice?
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a b U Graphics card
August 5, 2013 12:18:50 PM

Keep in mind that OEMs like HP and Dell use the lowest cost components they can find. That great i7 processor could easily be on a crap motherboard, in a case with one 120mm fan and three 3.5" drive bays, and with the worst 1333 RAM money can buy.

It usually isn't worth sacrificing the freedom of picking out your own components for the $150 or whatever you save.
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