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DDR3-1066 (PC3-8500) Upgrade Memory Questions

Tags:
  • Intel i7
  • Triple Channel
  • DDR3
  • Computers
  • Memory
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Memory
August 6, 2013 10:56:23 AM

I am thinking about increasing my computer's memory. It has an Intel i7-920 on an x58 motherboard. According to my motherboard's specs (available here), the board has a triple channel memory architecture, 6 DDR3 sockets, and only supports PC3-8500 (DDR3-1066) DIMM types. I currently have 6 GB (3DIMMs of 2GB).

Questions:

1) After reading the forum FAQ sticky and several postings, it looks like it is highly recommended that I need to buy a "kit" with 3 DIMMs and discard the existing memory in order to minimize potential errors. Is this true?

2) Assuming I need a triple channel kit, the only ones I can find on the Memory manufacturers' websites and Newegg are higher speeds, specifically DDR3 1333 (with three different subtypes: PC3 10600, PC3 10660, and PC3 10666) and DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800). Again, based on forum comments, it sounds like the system will be fine with these options although the memory will be limited to the 1066 speeds due to the motherboard limitation. Is this true?

3) If I decide to fill all six DIMM slots, the two "kits" I purchase should be the same brand, model, etc. in order to minimize any memory problems, correct?

Thank you for your help.

More about : ddr3 1066 pc3 8500 upgrade memory questions

a c 207 } Memory
a b V Motherboard
August 6, 2013 11:07:07 AM

ruawahoo2 said:
I am thinking about increasing my computer's memory. It has an Intel i7-920 on an x58 motherboard. According to my motherboard's specs (available here), the board has a triple channel memory architecture, 6 DDR3 sockets, and only supports PC3-8500 (DDR3-1066) DIMM types. I currently have 6 GB (3DIMMs of 2GB).

Questions:

1) After reading the forum FAQ sticky and several postings, it looks like it is highly recommended that I need to buy a "kit" with 3 DIMMs and discard the existing memory in order to minimize potential errors. Is this true?

2) Assuming I need a triple channel kit, the only ones I can find on the Memory manufacturers' websites and Newegg are higher speeds, specifically DDR3 1333 (with three different subtypes: PC3 10600, PC3 10660, and PC3 10666) and DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800). Again, based on forum comments, it sounds like the system will be fine with these options although the memory will be limited to the 1066 speeds due to the motherboard limitation. Is this true?

3) If I decide to fill all six DIMM slots, the two "kits" I purchase should be the same brand, model, etc. in order to minimize any memory problems, correct?

Thank you for your help.

Hello,:hello: 

1. It is not mandatory that you need to buy the memory in kits. The reason why many recommend the memory in kits, is because they are matched in all aspects and will work with ease but you may find it a little difficult when you are mixing different memory. But OEM manufacturer's like HP have the ability to utilize any memory that is compatible and it will work. If you are not comfortable with memory kits then buy three modules of the same brand, speed, size and voltage, it will work.

2. Yes, your motherboard support 1066MHz or 1333MHz memory. Maybe the higher speed will be downclocked to 1066MHz. Otherwise, you should be fine even wit 1333MHz.

3. That's correct. Buy same brand, size, speed, CAS latency (CL timing) and Voltage. This way you will mnimize any potential errors. If you are not able to buy a kit then try buying a single memory of the same part number.

DDR3-1333MHz memory below:
http://www.memorystock.com/orderitem.asp?it=810ms-810

DDR3-1066MHz memory below:
http://www.memorystock.com/orderitem.asp?it=805ms-805

Good luck with the upgrade!!! :hihi: 
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a c 5390 } Memory
a c 4209 V Motherboard
August 6, 2013 3:35:32 PM

What mobo do you have? I can't think of any X58s that are limited to only 1066 DRAM, all what CPU and is it OCed at all?
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Related resources
a c 207 } Memory
a b V Motherboard
August 6, 2013 3:44:16 PM

Tradesman1 said:
What mobo do you have? I can't think of any X58s that are limited to only 1066 DRAM, all what CPU and is it OCed at all?

It's a OEM mobo. He's already posted the specs in the OP. I guess, you did not notice it any way check the below link for the same -
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?cc=us&lc=en...
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a c 5390 } Memory
a c 4209 V Motherboard
August 6, 2013 3:51:04 PM

Sure did miss it ;)  Don't know on the Pegatrons, some of them required proprietary DRAM so HP could lock people in to upgrading through them, might check also if it has a locked BIOS, if so and sticks are iffy you can't adjust voltages to smooth them out, sort of like with most laptops
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August 8, 2013 2:28:11 PM

Thank you all for your help. I do have a few follow-up questions:

I cracked the hood and took out the memory that was shipped with my system. Although the BIOS/motherboard limits the memory to DDR3-1066 speeds (which I confirmed), the memory shipped with the system is DDR3-1333, thus confirming that the system will just throttle the memory down to DDR3-1066 speed.

Questions:

1) Is there any functional difference between PC3-10600, PC3-10660, and PCS-10666? They are all supposedly DDR3-1333.

2) I checked the BIOS and saw that there wasn't an option to adjust settings to the memory. If the BIOS is limited or restrictive in this manner, will/can this affect my ability to add new (but matching) memory sticks?

3) Since the BIOS does restrict my ability to adjust the memory settings, do I need to make sure that whatever my current memory timing is matches the new memory I drop into the system? Or will the system will likely adjust to whatever timing the new memory is set at (so long as all the new sticks are the same)?

4) If I need to replicate the timing of my existing memory due to the BIOS restrictions, could someone help me figure out the timing of my existing memory? I tried to use the the Memory FAQ/Read First to help me but it the Micron spec sheets didn't quite line up to the sticky's explanation. What is the timing sequence (?-?-?-?)?

Memory stick info:
MT16JTF25664AY-1G4D1 200919 CBNDQN5001
Country of Origin: Singapore Lead Free
2GB 2RX8 PC3-10600U-9-10-B0
2GB DDR3, 1333, CL9
Link to the Micron Memory Spec sheet: click here.

Again, thank you everyone for helping me learn about all this.
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Best solution

a c 207 } Memory
a b V Motherboard
August 8, 2013 3:21:02 PM

ruawahoo2 said:

Questions:

1) Is there any functional difference between PC3-10600, PC3-10660, and PCS-10666? They are all supposedly DDR3-1333.

2) I checked the BIOS and saw that there wasn't an option to adjust settings to the memory. If the BIOS is limited or restrictive in this manner, will/can this affect my ability to add new (but matching) memory sticks?

3) Since the BIOS does restrict my ability to adjust the memory settings, do I need to make sure that whatever my current memory timing is matches the new memory I drop into the system? Or will the system will likely adjust to whatever timing the new memory is set at (so long as all the new sticks are the same)?

4) If I need to replicate the timing of my existing memory due to the BIOS restrictions, could someone help me figure out the timing of my existing memory? I tried to use the the Memory FAQ/Read First to help me but it the Micron spec sheets didn't quite line up to the sticky's explanation. What is the timing sequence (?-?-?-?)?

Memory stick info:
MT16JTF25664AY-1G4D1 200919 CBNDQN5001
Country of Origin: Singapore Lead Free
2GB 2RX8 PC3-10600U-9-10-B0
2GB DDR3, 1333, CL9
Link to the Micron Memory Spec sheet: click here.

Again, thank you everyone for helping me learn about all this.

1. Functional difference? No!! The exact memory bandwidth is PC3-10666 but most often it is simply referred as PC3-10600 or PC3-10660.

2. Yes, that is one of the downside of OEM systems - Locked BIOS. No, it does not limit your ability to add memory but however going with advanced timed memory like Corsair or Gskill is a not the best option, IMO. So stick with basic ram (ValueRAM) and match the speed, CL latency and probably the size and you are good to go.

3. Matching the memory timings is essential so try to match the timings. Your existing memory is a CL9 memory, so try to get a CL9 memory and make sure it is Dual Rank (2R) memory. Yes, even if you mix the memory timings, it should work but I do no recommend it.

4. The number sequence is in the following order - CL-tRCD-tRP. Out of the CL is what you need to match the rest can be ignored.. Note: CL - Clock cycles between sending a column address to the memory and the beginning of the data in response.

Compatible memory with your memory: (all are 2GB modules)
http://www.memorystock.com/orderitem.asp?it=809ms-809
http://www.crucial.com/store/partspecs.aspx?imodule=CT2...
http://www.amazon.com/Elpida-2GB-2RX8-10600U-9-10-BO-EB...
Kingston KVR1333D3N9/2G

If you need 4GB modules then search using the keyword - 4GB "2RX8 PC3-10600U"

Hope I 've covered everything. Cheers!!!

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