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i5 2500k with new cooler: Hyper 212 Evo

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August 6, 2013 7:05:20 PM

Recently ordered the 212 evo and I found an extra 120mm fan lying around and plan on putting that on the Evo for a push pull config. The only thing is the fan is meant to be a chassis fan so its a 3-pin. Since it would be running at 100% all the time should I not even add it on? And if I should put it on, should it be pushing or pulling the air?

Also could someone give me an idea on the temps with the i5 2500k at 3.4ghz and at 4.0ghz with and without extra fan.

P.S. Sorry it's a lot of questions!
a b K Overclocking
a c 141 à CPUs
August 6, 2013 7:16:00 PM

If you don't have that cooler already, check out the considerably cheaper Xigmatek Gaia. With just one fan, it cools within 1C of the single-fan Hyper EVO, but is quieter (per Frostytech reviews), and as I said cheaper. It comes with the insulating rubber mounts to add a second fan.
If the second fan is low-speed (e.g. 800RPM) you won't hear it even at full. Even a 1000RPM fan should be pretty quiet.
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August 6, 2013 7:59:28 PM

+1 for Onus, Xigmatek Gaia is suffice for sandy bridge to push into 4.5GHz, with push/pull configuration, then i bet it would hit only delta of 40-45c over ambient.
whilst I still think the factor may not merely be the cpu cooler, you might need to customize your case as well to ensure sufficient and efficient airflow throughout the case.
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a b K Overclocking
a c 136 à CPUs
August 6, 2013 7:59:33 PM

For push-pull, the word on the street is that it's generally better to have identical fans. Part of this is because a lot of people use a PWM splitter for their fans, and different fans take a differing amount of amps. The other part of is it that it might not have that great of an affect on the airflow. Adding a second fan usually doesn't help too much anyway; results are usually under 5C.

That said, though, not all is lost. There are ways to affect the speed of your 3-pin fan. Some motherboards have features to control the fan RPM, but there are other third party programs out there. Speedfan, I believe, is one of them. I have yet to toy with the feature, but I found this tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VjdQStihsE The actual part to affect RPM starts roughly 7:30 into the video.
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August 6, 2013 8:06:21 PM

Onus said:
If you don't have that cooler already, check out the considerably cheaper Xigmatek Gaia. With just one fan, it cools within 1C of the single-fan Hyper EVO, but is quieter (per Frostytech reviews), and as I said cheaper. It comes with the insulating rubber mounts to add a second fan.
If the second fan is low-speed (e.g. 800RPM) you won't hear it even at full. Even a 1000RPM fan should be pretty quiet.

Too bad I didn't know this earlier :/  I already ordered it 2 days ago.
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a b K Overclocking
a c 141 à CPUs
August 6, 2013 8:11:20 PM

Well, you should still get decent performance; you just paid a little extra for it, that's all.
As Calculatron points out, using a PWM splitter on identical fans would be another way to control two fans. Check your mobo though; some have two CPU fan headers.
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August 6, 2013 8:48:16 PM

Onus said:
Well, you should still get decent performance; you just paid a little extra for it, that's all.
As Calculatron points out, using a PWM splitter on identical fans would be another way to control two fans. Check your mobo though; some have two CPU fan headers.

Okay will do. Any idea what my temps will be?
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August 6, 2013 8:58:16 PM

Let me said all heatsink is mostly the same, copper heatpipe, copper or/ and nickel base plate and aluminium fin.
Larger fin, more heat dissipate, more heatpipe, more heat transfer to fin.
Just add a high CFM and static pressure fan, and everything is as you wish, cool and quiet.
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