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First Ever Build. Need Feedback. Using Bitfenix Prodigy Orange Case...or maybe blue.

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August 6, 2013 8:28:00 PM

Hello everyone, just registered with the forums to get some input on my first ever PC build. Having absolutely zero experience building a computer except replacing the RAM on my laptop, all information I have gleaned has been from google searching "what is the best x for y." And most of those searches came to very informative TomsHardware.com articles or forum posts. So if any community can steer me in the correct direction, this seems like the place! I will try to stick to the format requested in the sticky.

Hope it isn't Tl;dr.

Goal: To build a gaming computer I will be very happy with afterwards.

This gaming computer needs to be:

Powerful (enough so I feel proud to show off my system for years to come)
Quiet (I was inspired by all the talk of a "steam box" so I am building this with the living room in mind)

Energy efficient (I have been researching PSU's and have decided to invest in an 80 plus platinum for energy saving, longevity of parts, reduction of heat, etc.

Compact (I really like the Bitfenix Prodigy Case, but am open to any small colorful case with handles)

And of course...Affordable. My original budget was $500-$700 but after doing research it seems for what I want $1000 is more realistic. What I'd like is the power of a $2000 machine for less than $1000.

Approximate Purchase Date: I'm in no rush really

Budget range: ~$1000, but would like it to be lower. Not at any major cost to performance though.

System Usage: Gaming is most important. I have never owned a modern gaming machine. I even bought the xbox 360 like...3 years ago. Would be nice to be confident in using it later in life for say CAD or STATA, but honestly I'll probably never have the drive to do real job stuff like that.

Monitor: Probably going to use my LG 47LM6700 at first.

Parts: Full build from scratch.

Operating System: Probably Windows 8 because I'm assuming its faster (a little concerned about my huge collection of older games on steam though.) It does not need to be included in budget.

Preferred website: I have never bought anything from Newegg, but Newegg and Amazon are fine by me.

Location: Pacifica, CA (Very near San Francisco)

Parts Preference: I have none as I am teh nub.

Overclocking: I won't be doing this at first, but I like the idea of being able to in the future.

SLI or Crossfire: Um maybe...I just had to google that.

Monitor Resolution: Not sure I guess. The best?! (I like the idea of multiple monitors one day too.

Additional Comments: PC Needs to be compact, impressive, quiet, energy efficient, and look professional. These are pretty important to me as they will help fight off the buyers remorse after spending $1000.


Why am I building: Because I want to finally be able to have the "wow experience" of higher end gaming. I plan to buy an Oculus Rift and potentially other cutting edge gaming peripherals. I am tired of playing 5 year old games on my laptop damn it!




Build in Progress (not really sure about how best to cool this bad boy as it will have a major impact on sound and energy efficiency.

I'm like 95% sure I want an SSD. I don't want to "upgrade later when I have money" I want it to be the pwnage right now!

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1n9xL

CPU Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core $219.99
CPU Cooler Intel BXRTS2011LC 74.0 CFM $89.99
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-H77N-WIFI Mini ITX LGA1155 $98.98
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 $63.00
Storage Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" SSD $94.99
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM $84.98
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB $259.99
Case BitFenix Prodigy (Orange) Mini ITX Tower $69.99
Power Supply SeaSonic 660W ATX12V / EPS12V $119.99
Optical Drive LG GH24NS95 DVD/CD Writer $15.99
Operating System Microsoft Windows 8 Professional (OEM) (64-bit) $129.98

Total: $1247.87

*Ram and OS may not need to be included in budget.

Bonus points for arguing whether it'd be better to make a $500 or a $1500 build.

Edit: Forgot to mention I want lots of inputs/outputs. HDMI port, plenty of USBs a couple USB 3.0s and even a slot for my digital camera memory card would be pretty cool.

Thanks.

Don't bump posts. - G

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August 6, 2013 9:19:18 PM

Well you can definitely do a bit better than that for $1200. You should definitely get the latest hardware you can get for your budget.

I would do something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X40 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($82.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87E-ITX Mini ITX LGA1150 Motherboard ($164.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($68.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($122.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card ($409.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: BitFenix Prodigy (Orange) Mini ITX Tower Case ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($71.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1269.86
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-07 00:19 EDT-0400)
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August 6, 2013 10:05:46 PM

Thanks for the response, but I'm pretty sold on a platinum PSU. Also when I google comparisons of the 3570k and the 4670k, the 3570k is slightly better in energy consumption and could potentially be better in the long run if I need to overclock, no?

I'm not really sure how to differentiate between mother boards either.
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August 9, 2013 7:29:29 PM

With the internal voltage regulator and the new chip-set design the 4670k will be more efficient in the long run, also, are you going to actively OC it out of the box? Or is this going to be a project for you further down the road? In which case it doesn't matter, I would say don't lock yourself into the mini ITX format, but look at some micro ATX as well, those boards slightly bigger, but still fit SFF cases and node style desktop boxes, they would also allow you to use AMD chipsets, which could save you more money, while offering you a slight performance boost.
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August 11, 2013 7:35:23 AM

Daniel Sassone said:
With the internal voltage regulator and the new chip-set design the 4670k will be more efficient in the long run, also, are you going to actively OC it out of the box? Or is this going to be a project for you further down the road? In which case it doesn't matter, I would say don't lock yourself into the mini ITX format, but look at some micro ATX as well, those boards slightly bigger, but still fit SFF cases and node style desktop boxes, they would also allow you to use AMD chipsets, which could save you more money, while offering you a slight performance boost.


Thanks for the reply! I changed my CPU to the 4670k on your suggestion, its basically the same price. I almost picked the i7 version as well, but then decided against it. Doesn't seem worth it for $100 more and little practical performance boost. I'm going with the mini ITX format simply because thats all that is compatible with the Bitfenix Prodigy as far as I know. And that case is really cool looking! I want my first build to be something I'm proud to show off and that case fits the ticket.

Updated link http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1qpxM

Still undecided on GPU, and since I won't be buying parts until the Holidays I'm hoping something better in the same price range comes around or these get cheaper.
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August 11, 2013 2:10:35 PM

Corwin of Gob said:
Thanks for the response, but I'm pretty sold on a platinum PSU. Also when I google comparisons of the 3570k and the 4670k, the 3570k is slightly better in energy consumption and could potentially be better in the long run if I need to overclock, no?

I'm not really sure how to differentiate between mother boards either.


There's virtually no difference between a bronze, silver, gold, or platinum PSU. Really you're paying more money for a false sense of security. As long as it's rated and uses solid internal components, you're fine.
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