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TEC cooling cpu

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August 6, 2013 9:50:28 PM

I'm planning on getting the new fx 9000 series cpu I havent decided on the 9370 or 9590 yet. With the amazing amount of heat these put out especially with overclocking I have read some articles that say tec cooling maybe the way to go. I understand the idea behind it but what exactly do I need to make this work? I have read articles with vauge references to modifying you cooling system but what exactly is different form a regular cooling loop?

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a b K Overclocking
a b à CPUs
August 6, 2013 10:16:31 PM

The addition of a Peltier plate between the CPU and the waterblock is what makes TEC unique. The peltier plate will get extremely cold on one side and equally hot on the other. The hot side must be cooled or the peltier will burn itself out.

Really it's hardly worth the hassle. If a standard watercooling loop won't do the trick then you would be better of considering a phase change kit.
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a b K Overclocking
a c 190 à CPUs
August 6, 2013 10:16:43 PM

I'm honestly having a hard time believing that anyone would want to go for those CPUs. The aging Intel Sandybridge-E microprocessors are better and put out a lot less heat. With Ivybridge-E expected next month it is in my profession opinion that you should reconsider how to best spend your money.

If you insist on paying for an FX9000 series CPU, then TEC may be the way to go.

TEC stands for Thermal Electric Cooling. It uses the Peltier effect to move thermal energy from one side of a bimetal junction to the other side.

The heat from the hot side of the junction can be dumped into a heatsink, but this would somewhat negate the purpose of using a TEC cooler in the first place. Rather, it's more common to dump the heat into a water cooling loop just like traditional water cooling.

The only real difference between a TEC cooling system and a traditional water cooling system is that the cooling block requires electricity.

There are a few considerations though. First, TEC is active, this means that it can drop the temperature around the socket below that of the environment. Not as much as a vapor phase-change cooling solution, but enough that it can cause condensation if the temperature is set too low. It is possible to drop some TEC plates below freezing, so insulating the socket may be necessary.

Second, TEC is extremely electrically inefficient. Cooling a microprocessor with a traditional HSF assembly draws about 5-10 watts for the fan. Cooling a microprocessor with a gigantic D5 water pump draws about 30 watts at most at high speed. Cooling a microprocessor with a TEC plate draws between 50 and 60 watts, plus whatever additional power is needed for the pump and fans. The power consumed by the effect is dumped into the hot side of the plate. Using a TEC to cool a CPU can add half again as much heat as the CPU is generating.

In general, adding a cold plate is not necessary and a traditional custom water cooling loop is usually preferable. Most enthusiasts go straight from water cooling to compression systems.
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a c 239 K Overclocking
a c 103 à CPUs
August 7, 2013 3:29:24 AM

Jklein said:
I'm planning on getting the new fx 9000 series cpu I havent decided on the 9370 or 9590 yet. With the amazing amount of heat these put out especially with overclocking I have read some articles that say tec cooling maybe the way to go. I understand the idea behind it but what exactly do I need to make this work? I have read articles with vauge references to modifying you cooling system but what exactly is different form a regular cooling loop?


Traditional radiator water cooling as with traditional heat pipe air coolers are an ambient cooling solution, there is a point, that some custom water cooling loops perform no better than the best heat pipe air coolers do.

Radiator water cooling pulls ahead when there is enough radiator cooling field to handle the heat load generated from the overclocking, but radiator cooling no matter how many radiators you have, can only yield cooling down to ambient room temperature.

That's the best you can hope for no matter how much you invest in radiators, pumps, fans, etc., is cooling down to ambient.

TEC cooling will allow you to go below ambient, or down to below zero, if that's what you want to do, and yield much more cooling than you'll ever get with traditional air or water cooling, cbrunnem has already provided a link to the cooling I am running.

The thread has links to a peltier education of what can and cannot be done using peltier cooling, and links to other cooling solutions regarding TECs even to direct CPU below zero capable mountings if that is what you want to do.

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August 7, 2013 1:46:51 PM

4Ryan6 said:
Jklein said:
I'm planning on getting the new fx 9000 series cpu I havent decided on the 9370 or 9590 yet. With the amazing amount of heat these put out especially with overclocking I have read some articles that say tec cooling maybe the way to go. I understand the idea behind it but what exactly do I need to make this work? I have read articles with vauge references to modifying you cooling system but what exactly is different form a regular cooling loop?


Traditional radiator water cooling as with traditional heat pipe air coolers are an ambient cooling solution, there is a point, that some custom water cooling loops perform no better than the best heat pipe air coolers do.

Radiator water cooling pulls ahead when there is enough radiator cooling field to handle the heat load generated from the overclocking, but radiator cooling no matter how many radiators you have, can only yield cooling down to ambient room temperature.

That's the best you can hope for no matter how much you invest in radiators, pumps, fans, etc., is cooling down to ambient.

TEC cooling will allow you to go below ambient, or down to below zero, if that's what you want to do, and yield much more cooling than you'll ever get with traditional air or water cooling, cbrunnem has already provided a link to the cooling I am running.

The thread has links to a peltier education of what can and cannot be done using peltier cooling, and links to other cooling solutions regarding TECs even to direct CPU below zero capable mountings if that is what you want to do.



So basically the only difference in the setup is putting the Pelletier in between the cpu and the water block and you put the hot side facing the water block
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a b K Overclocking
a c 190 à CPUs
August 7, 2013 2:15:19 PM

Jklein said:
4Ryan6 said:
Jklein said:
I'm planning on getting the new fx 9000 series cpu I havent decided on the 9370 or 9590 yet. With the amazing amount of heat these put out especially with overclocking I have read some articles that say tec cooling maybe the way to go. I understand the idea behind it but what exactly do I need to make this work? I have read articles with vauge references to modifying you cooling system but what exactly is different form a regular cooling loop?


Traditional radiator water cooling as with traditional heat pipe air coolers are an ambient cooling solution, there is a point, that some custom water cooling loops perform no better than the best heat pipe air coolers do.

Radiator water cooling pulls ahead when there is enough radiator cooling field to handle the heat load generated from the overclocking, but radiator cooling no matter how many radiators you have, can only yield cooling down to ambient room temperature.

That's the best you can hope for no matter how much you invest in radiators, pumps, fans, etc., is cooling down to ambient.

TEC cooling will allow you to go below ambient, or down to below zero, if that's what you want to do, and yield much more cooling than you'll ever get with traditional air or water cooling, cbrunnem has already provided a link to the cooling I am running.

The thread has links to a peltier education of what can and cannot be done using peltier cooling, and links to other cooling solutions regarding TECs even to direct CPU below zero capable mountings if that is what you want to do.



So basically the only difference in the setup is putting the Pelletier in between the cpu and the water block and you put the hot side facing the water block


That's correct. I included that in my post above.
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