hard drive pcb damaged?

My data hard drive won't run, it is not the system hard drive. I know, no back up. This was my back up hard drive because the mirror data hard drive also crashed recently. It has not been used a lot, and is rather new. So I did not expect it to crash. When turned on it makes almost silent clicks and loud beeps. It does not spin up. It is a seagate 2tb. When the hard drive crashed, it was very hot to touch. When crashing it was mounted and running, and had been used. Then I wanted to access a file on the hard drive, and it started to beep loud, and no access to files. My main board supports choose boot drive when starting the computer. Before chrashing the data hard drive would show on the list, now it does not. Is it most likely the pcb? Thanks.
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  1. antiglobal said:
    Beeping could mean power issues (not enough power). If it is an external drive than try other USB port and if you have double UBC connector cable (like Transcend ones have) plugg in both of them. If it is internal one, than try other power cable for HDD. It could be the PCB. Clicking could mean that head motor controler has failed (so, PCB).
    Did the PCB got hot or the drive itself?


    Thank you for answering. If possible I want to get to the data, it is important for me. It is a 2tb Seagate Barracuda Green st2000dl003 3.5" internal hard drive.
    I had the hard drive connected with the pc's internal power supply. It is a big 600w, and not much is connected to the power supply. At crash it was connected via esata port. After crashing I connected via another power supply connector and a usb sata adapter. But it only beebs very loudly. When it crashed I touched it only on the top, because I did not want to move it. It felt like hot all over. I read an advice telling to varm the hard drive shortly on low temp in an oven, and then run it? The hard drive is full hard drive truecrypt enctrypted.
  2. It sounds like stiction (heads stuck to platters) or seized spindle motor.
  3. fzabkar said:
    It sounds like stiction (heads stuck to platters) or seized spindle motor.


    that cannot be repaired? thanks.
  4. Stiction faults are usually an easy repair, but seized spindles can require an expensive platter transfer.
  5. antiglobal said:
    It can be repaired, but only in the "clean room". And, if the HDD fault is mechanical than it will cost you an arm and a leg to get your data back.

    Advice for the future: Configure 2 HDDs in RAID1 configuration. Or if you have more than 2 RAID5. That way, if one drive fails, you just replace it and you data is not lost.


    Thank you.
    About backup.
    I had two data hard drives mirrored. One connected and one not. Then synchronised them from time to time. Both hard drives rather new. At least the one not connected was not used much. Both crashed before I got a new to backup on. On top of that data was partly backupted on a 3. hard drive, that also brooke.
  6. fzabkar said:
    Stiction faults are usually an easy repair, but seized spindles can require an expensive platter transfer.


    Can you give me some advice? Should I try to get a replacement pcb? Or could that damage the hard drive even more, if the error is mechanical? What firms should I contact for solving the problem? Is the data safe now, if I keep the hard drive, and then when I want to spend the money, I can ship the hard drive for repair? Thanks.
  7. The PCB is probably OK.

    If it's a simple stiction fault, the repair involves pushing the head stack to the loading ramp while turning the motor in its normal direction of motion. The professionals may use a "head comb". I've only ever seen one guy say that he routinely replaces the heads in such cases. That said, they all charge like wounded bulls.

    If the motor is seized and cannot be freed, then your drive will need a platter transfer. This can be very expensive. In such cases I suggest you take advantage of a fixed price service (US$800 plus parts):

    http://myharddrivedied.com/hard-drive-recovery
  8. The PCB is probably OK.

    If it's a simple stiction fault, the repair involves pushing the head stack to the loading ramp while turning the motor in its normal direction of motion. The professionals may use a "head comb". I've only ever seen one guy say that he routinely replaces the heads in such cases. That said, they all charge like wounded bulls.

    If the motor is seized and cannot be freed, then your drive will need a platter transfer. This can be very expensive. In such cases I suggest you take advantage of a fixed price service (US$800 plus parts):

    http://myharddrivedied.com/hard-drive-recovery
  9. fzabkar said:
    The PCB is probably OK.

    If it's a simple stiction fault, the repair involves pushing the head stack to the loading ramp while turning the motor in its normal direction of motion. The professionals may use a "head comb". I've only ever seen one guy say that he routinely replaces the heads in such cases. That said, they all charge like wounded bulls.

    If the motor is seized and cannot be freed, then your drive will need a platter transfer. This can be very expensive. In such cases I suggest you take advantage of a fixed price service (US$800 plus parts):

    http://myharddrivedied.com/hard-drive-recovery


    But letting the hard drive lay around until I want to pay for a repair, is not a problem? Thank you.
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