Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

New build won't post

Last response: in Systems
Share
August 7, 2013 7:01:27 PM

Hey,

I've put together my new PC based around an ASRock H77M-ITX motherboard, and I'm having trouble getting it to boot. It powers up, the CPU fans and HD all seem to start correctly, but a few seconds later it powers down again. After a few more seconds, the process repeats itself. I never see any video output, and I get no beeps (though there doesn't seem to be a header for a speaker. It's more than a decade since I last built a pc, so I don't know whether that's normal now).

I have the system stripped down to just psu, cpu, ram and motherboard. I have the cpu power connector hooked up, and I tried clearing the cmos. I'm not sure what else to try, or how to narrow down what might be wrong.

Any suggestions appreciated!

More about : build post

a b V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2013 7:24:13 PM

Possible static build up?
m
0
l

Best solution

a b V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
August 7, 2013 8:07:21 PM

You've stripped it to bare essentials. However, is it mounted in a case, or out on an insulating surface. That's a true "breadboard" set-up for troubleshooting.

Do you have the power leads for the CPU chip connected, too, as well as the main mobo connector?

Check the connections for the CPU cooler. Is it plugged into the mobo CPU_FAN port? Some mobos will check that the CPU cooler is working by looking for the fan's speed signal on the CPU_FAN port. If it finds none, it assumes the CPU cooler has failed and, without waiting for the CPU to overheat, it will shut down the system to prevent CPU damage. cSo if the Fan IS plugged in there, make sure its connection is good. If it is NOT (you are powering from a PSU Molex connector or a fan controller), maybe try to plug into the mobo port temporarily. If that works, you can go into the BIOS Setup screens, find the CPU cooling control system, and set it to Ignore the CPU fan speed if you don;t plan to use that feature.

What about actual CPU cooling? Did you apply thermal paste to the CPU cooler before installing? Or, if your cooler came with pre-applied thermal paste, did you remove the protective plastic film over it before installing? Your story almost sounds like inadequate CPU cooling.
Share
Related resources
August 8, 2013 5:30:07 AM

Thanks so much for the replies. In order:

Jonathan Silfleet: I'm not sure what you mean by static buildup, after plugging the system in shouldn't any static charge escape to earth? Do you mean that static buildup zapped a component while I was putting the system together? I guess it's possible, but I was trying to be careful to earth myself.

Paperdoc: I have the board mounted in a case. I can try it on a square of cardboard when I get home from work this evening.
I do have the CPU power leads connected (good question though, I missed it the first time through; it's another thing that's been introduced since I last built a PC).

I'm using the standard cooler that ships with the i3 3220. The CPU fan is plugged into the CPU fan port on the mobo, and I have a case fan plugged into the chassis fan port next to it (I've tried running without that connected also).

I have applied thermal paste (maybe too much?) The cooler didn't appear to have any film covering the base. I'll experiment with the cooling system when I get home also.

Thanks again for the help. I'll post again when I've tried some more things.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2013 9:09:37 AM

foober said:
Thanks so much for the replies. In order:

Jonathan Silfleet: I'm not sure what you mean by static buildup, after plugging the system in shouldn't any static charge escape to earth? Do you mean that static buildup zapped a component while I was putting the system together? I guess it's possible, but I was trying to be careful to earth myself.

Paperdoc: I have the board mounted in a case. I can try it on a square of cardboard when I get home from work this evening.
I do have the CPU power leads connected (good question though, I missed it the first time through; it's another thing that's been introduced since I last built a PC).

I'm using the standard cooler that ships with the i3 3220. The CPU fan is plugged into the CPU fan port on the mobo, and I have a case fan plugged into the chassis fan port next to it (I've tried running without that connected also).

I have applied thermal paste (maybe too much?) The cooler didn't appear to have any film covering the base. I'll experiment with the cooling system when I get home also.

Thanks again for the help. I'll post again when I've tried some more things.


Yes its possible that static zapped a component but very unlikely.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2013 5:13:54 PM

So you did your own thermal paste, that eliminates the pre-applied possible error. Your comment "maybe too much?" is a small possibility. To check, go to the website of the paste manufacturer, and look for their recommendations for the particular CPU you have. It's been a while since I did this, but I know that it is surprising how little is needed. And you could be on a useful track there - too much definitely impedes good cooling, but I doubt it would ruin it so that it only runs for 5 seconds!
m
0
l
August 8, 2013 6:14:20 PM

Ok, so I took the board back out of the case this evening, took off the ram and cpu, removed some thermal paste, reseated them (again) and set it up on a scrap of cardboard. This time it worked. The board has now posted, and I'm looking at the bios setup screen. Phew!

Taking it right back to basics was the correct approach. Thanks for all the help. I feel like I wasted your time :(  Now I just have to not break it getting it all back in the case.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
August 8, 2013 8:26:16 PM

To complete the breadboard process, you add components (like a HDD, a video card, more Ram, whatever) ONE at a time and boot up to verify it still works. If it quits at any step, remove the last addition and check. Maybe you will find a bad component that way. But if you get ALL the system together on the table top, you know it should work in the case when installed, too.

ONE reason for this, by the way, is that mistakes can be made when installing into the case. So the first part of that is to install in the case only the minimal components (PSU, mobo, CPU and cooler, RAM), to verify that they work in the case. Then add the rest.
m
0
l
August 9, 2013 8:26:20 AM

Paperdoc said:
To complete the breadboard process, you add components (like a HDD, a video card, more Ram, whatever) ONE at a time and boot up to verify it still works. If it quits at any step, remove the last addition and check. Maybe you will find a bad component that way. But if you get ALL the system together on the table top, you know it should work in the case when installed, too.


Thanks, that's how I went ahead last night. It's all together now, and all the bits seem to work fine. Thanks for your help!
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
August 9, 2013 10:42:19 AM

Hooray, you succeeded! And thanks for the BA.
m
0
l
!