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Graphics card air flow + Screws for GPU Problems! (Please read!)

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August 9, 2013 7:06:43 AM

Well I am getting a new GPU today :D , I was so happy, I open my Desktop to remove 2 slots so I can fit my Dual-Slot Graphics card :D  once its here in a few ours (still not here yet...) (Graphics Card - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

So I open it up and I see that the air space that the GPU will have, seems concerning:??: . Look at these 2 pictures and tell me your thoughts + its not over yet.

-Air Space Concern Pics-
#1 - https://www.dropbox.com/s/737bc832ggyexwj/CAM00285.jpg
#2 - https://www.dropbox.com/s/8h6r7zn4xjkv2e6/CAM00286.jpg

Then I look at the holes where the screws are going and they are like rounded covers? I am so confused? Do I hit them with a screwdriver to bang them out? Litterally?:pt1cable:  I dont know what to do! Please help!

Normal Screw Hole- https://www.dropbox.com/s/alrnlr5007s4ybm/CAM00287.jpg
Covered Screw Hole- https://www.dropbox.com/s/7plvkezvy6ipqky/CAM00288.jpg
All of them - https://www.dropbox.com/s/diwqv4xavlwcmx1/CAM00289.jpg

Please help, I cant wait to get my new graphics card (My Integrated GPU is horrible) and I just want to put it in, install drivers, and do all the normal stuff. Then use it! Please help! THANK YOU IN ADVANCE :D  :bounce: 
a b U Graphics card
August 9, 2013 7:29:10 AM

I am guessing based on your pictures that you have a brand name box. Probably a Dell ?

In any case, they don't always use normal screw holes. Those sticking out pins where the screw holes are serve to hold the card in place sometimes and an additional clip then goes over this to secure the card (Dell and Lenovo does that a lot).

As for your air space, be sure to remove all the rear PCI brackets to allow air to flow outwards above the GPU space. If you have a front case fan in this section (Dells usually do) that pushes air in, opening those rear brackets will complete the flow to allow hot air exhausted by the GPU's cooler to be circulated to the back and out.

Having said all that, in your case, the air flow isn't that high (brand name box, again), so I would recommend a reference styled, squirrel-cage cooler that directly exhausts to the outside. Those coolers on GPUs cope a lot better with reduced room and air flow situations. I have a similar brand named box that I used a few different GPUs with, and while you can get away with open-air coolers, those direct-exhaust to the back, squirrel-cage coolers typically do the best.
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a b U Graphics card
August 9, 2013 7:31:57 AM

I also noticed that your card you linked to is a DDR3 version of the HD7750. Go for a GDDR5 version!! DDR3 HD7750 is a reduced-price model of the much faster HD7750 with GDDR5 (full-fledged model). GDDR5 has twice the bandwidth of DDR3 at the same speed, so go figure.

The ASUS HD7750 is also a nice card and runs cool. The HD7790s are really nice too, get one on sale, and it'll be around 100 bucks.
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August 9, 2013 7:38:56 AM

Maxx_Power said:
I am guessing based on your pictures that you have a brand name box. Probably a Dell ?

In any case, they don't always use normal screw holes. Those sticking out pins where the screw holes are serve to hold the card in place sometimes and an additional clip then goes over this to secure the card (Dell and Lenovo does that a lot).

As for your air space, be sure to remove all the rear PCI brackets to allow air to flow outwards above the GPU space. If you have a front case fan in this section (Dells usually do) that pushes air in, opening those rear brackets will complete the flow to allow hot air exhausted by the GPU's cooler to be circulated to the back and out.

Having said all that, in your case, the air flow isn't that high (brand name box, again), so I would recommend a reference styled, squirrel-cage cooler that directly exhausts to the outside. Those coolers on GPUs cope a lot better with reduced room and air flow situations. I have a similar brand named box that I used a few different GPUs with, and while you can get away with open-air coolers, those direct-exhaust to the back, squirrel-cage coolers typically do the best.


Its HP. I have only the Fan on the CPU and the fan on the back of the PC, and I will remove the other Port opennings.
Would this (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) help? I believe it shoots air up which wont help.

If I get a GPU, and leave it like the current place, would it be fine for gaming and everything? Without a fan.
And If I do need a fan, any good onces that shoot air down, from Newegg?
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August 9, 2013 7:44:19 AM

Maxx_Power said:
I also noticed that your card you linked to is a DDR3 version of the HD7750. Go for a GDDR5 version!! DDR3 HD7750 is a reduced-price model of the much faster HD7750 with GDDR5 (full-fledged model). GDDR5 has twice the bandwidth of DDR3 at the same speed, so go figure.

The ASUS HD7750 is also a nice card and runs cool. The HD7790s are really nice too, get one on sale, and it'll be around 100 bucks.


I was looking for the best card I could find, without the need to connect to my PSU, and that was the one I found, where I could just draw power from the motherboard/slot + no PSU upgrade needed.
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Best solution

a b U Graphics card
August 9, 2013 7:51:47 AM

Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
I also noticed that your card you linked to is a DDR3 version of the HD7750. Go for a GDDR5 version!! DDR3 HD7750 is a reduced-price model of the much faster HD7750 with GDDR5 (full-fledged model). GDDR5 has twice the bandwidth of DDR3 at the same speed, so go figure.

The ASUS HD7750 is also a nice card and runs cool. The HD7790s are really nice too, get one on sale, and it'll be around 100 bucks.


I was looking for the best card I could find, without the need to connect to my PSU, and that was the one I found, where I could just draw power from the motherboard/slot + no PSU upgrade needed.


All those fans like the Evercool one you linked to, exhaust air to the outside. Check your case to see if you have some spots to install additional fans, especially on the front. With HP, there usually isn't much, just a spot or 2 on the back side for exhaust fans.

Can you check to see if your PSU includes a 6 PIN GPU power wire harness ? If it does, you can safely toss in a HD7790 or so. What is the wattage of your PSU ?

The air space itself seems rather OKAY. There is enough room for any (up to 2 slots wide) GPU and any cooling configuration of the GPU (open, closed, semi-open/closed), BUT you absolutely need some air flow. To get that air flow, open up the brackets above the GPU, then either install some fans front or back. If there is already a back fan installed, you can use a set of wire-cutters to cut off the steel mesh that usually blocks a large amount of air flow to get more air flow. This sets up the system to take in some air over the GPU via the open slots, then exhausted by the rear fan (or air flows over the GPU then out the slots, for front-fan configs).
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August 9, 2013 8:02:24 AM

Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
I also noticed that your card you linked to is a DDR3 version of the HD7750. Go for a GDDR5 version!! DDR3 HD7750 is a reduced-price model of the much faster HD7750 with GDDR5 (full-fledged model). GDDR5 has twice the bandwidth of DDR3 at the same speed, so go figure.

The ASUS HD7750 is also a nice card and runs cool. The HD7790s are really nice too, get one on sale, and it'll be around 100 bucks.


I was looking for the best card I could find, without the need to connect to my PSU, and that was the one I found, where I could just draw power from the motherboard/slot + no PSU upgrade needed.


All those fans like the Evercool one you linked to, exhaust air to the outside. Check your case to see if you have some spots to install additional fans, especially on the front. With HP, there usually isn't much, just a spot or 2 on the back side for exhaust fans.

Can you check to see if your PSU includes a 6 PIN GPU power wire harness ? If it does, you can safely toss in a HD7790 or so. What is the wattage of your PSU ?

The air space itself seems rather OKAY. There is enough room for any (up to 2 slots wide) GPU and any cooling configuration of the GPU (open, closed, semi-open/closed), BUT you absolutely need some air flow. To get that air flow, open up the brackets above the GPU, then either install some fans front or back. If there is already a back fan installed, you can use a set of wire-cutters to cut off the steel mesh that usually blocks a large amount of air flow to get more air flow. This sets up the system to take in some air over the GPU via the open slots, then exhausted by the rear fan (or air flows over the GPU then out the slots, for front-fan configs).


No additional spots to install fans. I did check my PSU for the 6 Pin GPU Power Wire, no luck. So thats why I wanted to go with the one I linked originally. Its a 300W PSU stock, and according to everyone I asked in a last thread I made, it should work easily with the 2 fans + that GPU and my current CPU (AMD A8-5500, 3.2Ghz Quad Core) and stuff.

What do you really recommend. I have No experience installing fans. I opened the slots so there is air flow, and I will obtain wire cutters soon to remove the steel mesh near the fan if possible.

My question is, if I am gaming heavy duty games (high BO2, lots of HD videos, playing games CONSTANTLY on the max settings the GPU can handle at a good frame rate) , what do I really need to do. The air space is small, I know, but there isnt so much I can do, especially the idea of a weird remove metal mesh so I have metal sticks just sticking out.
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August 9, 2013 8:05:06 AM

Maxx_Power said:
I am guessing based on your pictures that you have a brand name box. Probably a Dell ?

In any case, they don't always use normal screw holes. Those sticking out pins where the screw holes are serve to hold the card in place sometimes and an additional clip then goes over this to secure the card (Dell and Lenovo does that a lot).

As for your air space, be sure to remove all the rear PCI brackets to allow air to flow outwards above the GPU space. If you have a front case fan in this section (Dells usually do) that pushes air in, opening those rear brackets will complete the flow to allow hot air exhausted by the GPU's cooler to be circulated to the back and out.

Having said all that, in your case, the air flow isn't that high (brand name box, again), so I would recommend a reference styled, squirrel-cage cooler that directly exhausts to the outside. Those coolers on GPUs cope a lot better with reduced room and air flow situations. I have a similar brand named box that I used a few different GPUs with, and while you can get away with open-air coolers, those direct-exhaust to the back, squirrel-cage coolers typically do the best.


Also with the little weird clips as you said for the GPU, how do I secure in place. There is a little thing on top near the bulge, that i pull out and its like a metal cover, but how do I use it. Sorry, I never installed a GPU or done any of this.
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a b U Graphics card
August 9, 2013 8:17:27 AM

Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
I am guessing based on your pictures that you have a brand name box. Probably a Dell ?

In any case, they don't always use normal screw holes. Those sticking out pins where the screw holes are serve to hold the card in place sometimes and an additional clip then goes over this to secure the card (Dell and Lenovo does that a lot).

As for your air space, be sure to remove all the rear PCI brackets to allow air to flow outwards above the GPU space. If you have a front case fan in this section (Dells usually do) that pushes air in, opening those rear brackets will complete the flow to allow hot air exhausted by the GPU's cooler to be circulated to the back and out.

Having said all that, in your case, the air flow isn't that high (brand name box, again), so I would recommend a reference styled, squirrel-cage cooler that directly exhausts to the outside. Those coolers on GPUs cope a lot better with reduced room and air flow situations. I have a similar brand named box that I used a few different GPUs with, and while you can get away with open-air coolers, those direct-exhaust to the back, squirrel-cage coolers typically do the best.


Also with the little weird clips as you said for the GPU, how do I secure in place. There is a little thing on top near the bulge, that i pull out and its like a metal cover, but how do I use it. Sorry, I never installed a GPU or done any of this.


The raised edges on the PCI-bracket (those little clips) will be digging into the screw hole spot on the GPU mount side. Then some kind of a clamping mechanism holds the whole thing together. Study the case carefully and you should see what I mean.

In your case, if you don't want to upgrade the PSU, then I would only recommend the HD7750, GDDR5 edition. It is a really good card, and better than what you have now by far.
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August 9, 2013 8:27:58 AM

Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
I am guessing based on your pictures that you have a brand name box. Probably a Dell ?

In any case, they don't always use normal screw holes. Those sticking out pins where the screw holes are serve to hold the card in place sometimes and an additional clip then goes over this to secure the card (Dell and Lenovo does that a lot).

As for your air space, be sure to remove all the rear PCI brackets to allow air to flow outwards above the GPU space. If you have a front case fan in this section (Dells usually do) that pushes air in, opening those rear brackets will complete the flow to allow hot air exhausted by the GPU's cooler to be circulated to the back and out.

Having said all that, in your case, the air flow isn't that high (brand name box, again), so I would recommend a reference styled, squirrel-cage cooler that directly exhausts to the outside. Those coolers on GPUs cope a lot better with reduced room and air flow situations. I have a similar brand named box that I used a few different GPUs with, and while you can get away with open-air coolers, those direct-exhaust to the back, squirrel-cage coolers typically do the best.


Also with the little weird clips as you said for the GPU, how do I secure in place. There is a little thing on top near the bulge, that i pull out and its like a metal cover, but how do I use it. Sorry, I never installed a GPU or done any of this.


The raised edges on the PCI-bracket (those little clips) will be digging into the screw hole spot on the GPU mount side. Then some kind of a clamping mechanism holds the whole thing together. Study the case carefully and you should see what I mean.

In your case, if you don't want to upgrade the PSU, then I would only recommend the HD7750, GDDR5 edition. It is a really good card, and better than what you have now by far.


Ok I found the "clamping" mechanism, its kinda hard to see as it blends in with the metal mesh inbetween the slots.
I will probably end up getting that card than, thank you.

But back to the fans, anything I need to do other than remove the other slots for air, for now? I cant remove the mesh today (don't have the tools, and I would have to wait for a parent to bring some, and yes, I am over 13 years of age >_> as it says on the bottom before posting) so what else can I really do? I am not really in a situation to spend money at all (the card really is the limit I have, the card you recommended is just what I need for my needs of gaming, so anything less will be useless as my parent wanted to get the best for the money. And I can't spend anything else really.

So point is, What non-spending techniques can I use for this desktop. Its in a corner of a room (not like enclosed, it has space...alot of space) so the back cant really be see from sight, so its good because if I do remove the mesh, its not visible. But I probably wont be allowed to do such thing to a desktop.

So like.....other than the slots. Anything else I can do...other than leaving the case open .-. (looks weird....xD) Anything...?
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a b U Graphics card
August 9, 2013 11:01:27 AM

Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
I am guessing based on your pictures that you have a brand name box. Probably a Dell ?

In any case, they don't always use normal screw holes. Those sticking out pins where the screw holes are serve to hold the card in place sometimes and an additional clip then goes over this to secure the card (Dell and Lenovo does that a lot).

As for your air space, be sure to remove all the rear PCI brackets to allow air to flow outwards above the GPU space. If you have a front case fan in this section (Dells usually do) that pushes air in, opening those rear brackets will complete the flow to allow hot air exhausted by the GPU's cooler to be circulated to the back and out.

Having said all that, in your case, the air flow isn't that high (brand name box, again), so I would recommend a reference styled, squirrel-cage cooler that directly exhausts to the outside. Those coolers on GPUs cope a lot better with reduced room and air flow situations. I have a similar brand named box that I used a few different GPUs with, and while you can get away with open-air coolers, those direct-exhaust to the back, squirrel-cage coolers typically do the best.


Also with the little weird clips as you said for the GPU, how do I secure in place. There is a little thing on top near the bulge, that i pull out and its like a metal cover, but how do I use it. Sorry, I never installed a GPU or done any of this.


The raised edges on the PCI-bracket (those little clips) will be digging into the screw hole spot on the GPU mount side. Then some kind of a clamping mechanism holds the whole thing together. Study the case carefully and you should see what I mean.

In your case, if you don't want to upgrade the PSU, then I would only recommend the HD7750, GDDR5 edition. It is a really good card, and better than what you have now by far.


Ok I found the "clamping" mechanism, its kinda hard to see as it blends in with the metal mesh inbetween the slots.
I will probably end up getting that card than, thank you.

But back to the fans, anything I need to do other than remove the other slots for air, for now? I cant remove the mesh today (don't have the tools, and I would have to wait for a parent to bring some, and yes, I am over 13 years of age >_> as it says on the bottom before posting) so what else can I really do? I am not really in a situation to spend money at all (the card really is the limit I have, the card you recommended is just what I need for my needs of gaming, so anything less will be useless as my parent wanted to get the best for the money. And I can't spend anything else really.

So point is, What non-spending techniques can I use for this desktop. Its in a corner of a room (not like enclosed, it has space...alot of space) so the back cant really be see from sight, so its good because if I do remove the mesh, its not visible. But I probably wont be allowed to do such thing to a desktop.

So like.....other than the slots. Anything else I can do...other than leaving the case open .-. (looks weird....xD) Anything...?


Okay, you can still improve the cooling situation without money. Here are a few ideas:

1) Put the computer on the ground (ideally in the basement if you have a workstation desk there). Air is cooler closer to the bottom of the room.

2) Check the computer for dust (CPU, intake holes, exhaust holes, and even in the PSU, blow it out with some compressed air, if you have some, or just vacuum it, CAREFULLY, out of the meshes) and cable mess. Tidy up the cables (carefully) with zip-ties or those steel-in-plastic garbate bag ties. Move them out of the way of air flow (do your best on this).

3) Cut that mesh at the fan. You'll be surprised how much air it withholds. Typically up to 40% (meshes are rated for % perforation, which can be equated to % air flow allowed), so if you cut it, 100% of the air pushed by the fan will be exhausted, improving airflow.

4) Check in the BIOS settings of the computer to see if there is a fan control speed setting. Usually it is along the lines of "quiet, normal, max, etc.." boosting this will change the response of the fan to thermal conditions (ramp up quicker or more aggressively).

Those are the most important aspects.
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August 9, 2013 8:11:07 PM

Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
I am guessing based on your pictures that you have a brand name box. Probably a Dell ?

In any case, they don't always use normal screw holes. Those sticking out pins where the screw holes are serve to hold the card in place sometimes and an additional clip then goes over this to secure the card (Dell and Lenovo does that a lot).

As for your air space, be sure to remove all the rear PCI brackets to allow air to flow outwards above the GPU space. If you have a front case fan in this section (Dells usually do) that pushes air in, opening those rear brackets will complete the flow to allow hot air exhausted by the GPU's cooler to be circulated to the back and out.

Having said all that, in your case, the air flow isn't that high (brand name box, again), so I would recommend a reference styled, squirrel-cage cooler that directly exhausts to the outside. Those coolers on GPUs cope a lot better with reduced room and air flow situations. I have a similar brand named box that I used a few different GPUs with, and while you can get away with open-air coolers, those direct-exhaust to the back, squirrel-cage coolers typically do the best.


Also with the little weird clips as you said for the GPU, how do I secure in place. There is a little thing on top near the bulge, that i pull out and its like a metal cover, but how do I use it. Sorry, I never installed a GPU or done any of this.


The raised edges on the PCI-bracket (those little clips) will be digging into the screw hole spot on the GPU mount side. Then some kind of a clamping mechanism holds the whole thing together. Study the case carefully and you should see what I mean.

In your case, if you don't want to upgrade the PSU, then I would only recommend the HD7750, GDDR5 edition. It is a really good card, and better than what you have now by far.


Ok I found the "clamping" mechanism, its kinda hard to see as it blends in with the metal mesh inbetween the slots.
I will probably end up getting that card than, thank you.

But back to the fans, anything I need to do other than remove the other slots for air, for now? I cant remove the mesh today (don't have the tools, and I would have to wait for a parent to bring some, and yes, I am over 13 years of age >_> as it says on the bottom before posting) so what else can I really do? I am not really in a situation to spend money at all (the card really is the limit I have, the card you recommended is just what I need for my needs of gaming, so anything less will be useless as my parent wanted to get the best for the money. And I can't spend anything else really.

So point is, What non-spending techniques can I use for this desktop. Its in a corner of a room (not like enclosed, it has space...alot of space) so the back cant really be see from sight, so its good because if I do remove the mesh, its not visible. But I probably wont be allowed to do such thing to a desktop.

So like.....other than the slots. Anything else I can do...other than leaving the case open .-. (looks weird....xD) Anything...?


Okay, you can still improve the cooling situation without money. Here are a few ideas:

1) Put the computer on the ground (ideally in the basement if you have a workstation desk there). Air is cooler closer to the bottom of the room.

2) Check the computer for dust (CPU, intake holes, exhaust holes, and even in the PSU, blow it out with some compressed air, if you have some, or just vacuum it, CAREFULLY, out of the meshes) and cable mess. Tidy up the cables (carefully) with zip-ties or those steel-in-plastic garbate bag ties. Move them out of the way of air flow (do your best on this).

3) Cut that mesh at the fan. You'll be surprised how much air it withholds. Typically up to 40% (meshes are rated for % perforation, which can be equated to % air flow allowed), so if you cut it, 100% of the air pushed by the fan will be exhausted, improving airflow.

4) Check in the BIOS settings of the computer to see if there is a fan control speed setting. Usually it is along the lines of "quiet, normal, max, etc.." boosting this will change the response of the fan to thermal conditions (ramp up quicker or more aggressively).

Those are the most important aspects.


Thank you. The cables inside were already put with zip-ties, but I will make sure its all nice. + My room is cooler than all the other rooms. I will check the BIOS, and also AMD Settings + I will see if I can cut the Mesh.

I got my GPU, installed it, works awesomely. Now just trying as you said to make cooler air flow, because it gets a tiny warm near the GPU while on High graphics on games (runs games perfectly!) so the back fan really helps cool it down, and near night, when my room slightly gets cooler, it gets more efficient and doesnt feel as warm in the GPU air area.
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August 10, 2013 6:40:26 AM

No fan settings for this PC :( , so I dont know what to do. I was gaming all day yesterday (not all day, but alot of hours) and it was handling well. They air near the GPU was starting to get a bit warm but not as warm as I every would have expected (thats good) so I am just looking for tips to improve the air flow, because I am in no position to spend money at the moment, and I want my GPU to last :) 
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August 10, 2013 6:42:40 AM

+ When my room is nice and cool, the GPU even on Ultra settings on some games like Skyrim, BO2 maxed out, etc, has no real heat coming out of it. Now I am actually thinking, are there any cons of leaving ur pc case open?
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a b U Graphics card
August 10, 2013 6:54:13 AM

Rafi Santiago said:
+ When my room is nice and cool, the GPU even on Ultra settings on some games like Skyrim, BO2 maxed out, etc, has no real heat coming out of it. Now I am actually thinking, are there any cons of leaving ur pc case open?


There are a few caveats to leaving your case open all the time.

1) Airflow isn't optimal. Most cases are designed to allow the fans to suck/push air over the critical components by allowing ventilation in the case only in certain places. So in a typical ATX setup, the air is drawn over the HDDs, over the motherboard components, then out the back. In a BTX setup, air is drawn over the CPU/VRMs in the front, then over the rest of the components and out. So you see, if you leave the side open, that presents the LEAST resistant path to air flow, and thus air is simply drawn from the side and out the back. How much this is affecting your cooling varies depending on your case design and how hot the components are in your case.

2) Dust accumulation. Whirring air around the open computer is a source of air flow to carry and aggregate dust into dust balls/bunnies.

3) Accidental this or that. Liquid spill (happens more than you think), kicks to the inside, curious pets or critters, etc.

If you can, I would strongly recommend the removal of the rear mesh covering the fan. You can use household metal cutters (like for ducting/vent metal).

Which card did you end up getting, by the way ?
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August 10, 2013 7:04:42 AM

Well thanks for the answer. After reading online, I decided it doesn't seem like such a great idea to leave it open. I will try to remove the mesh today when I have time later. Hopefully it will help.

I ended up getting the MSi DDR3 2GB one. I really wanted to get the DDR5 as its so good as I saw in gameplays, and reviews. But it was at the last minute choice, and the DDR5 model was only $10 more even though its only 1GB of video memory. But my budget was $100, and I wish I could have saved up $20 more so then I could spend $120 and get the 2GB DDR5 model. But either way, it does all my needs, its a great GPU.

By the way, in December (Christmas xD) I plan on upgrading my PC Case. I want to get a effeccient air flow case, budget being $0-200, for a nice looking + efficient case with a PSU. (Its kinda fun looking at PC parts)

This one looks nice - http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
They can be seperate but if u ever see a nice efficient + one that might have LED lights (idk, optional stuff) then post it here.
Btw, I prefer to get a Consair PSU instead of a weird random one for low money that could be garbage.

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August 10, 2013 7:13:15 AM

BTW $200 is just a estimate without shipping, so about $250 max a case and PSU + Shipping

Some cases I found, would be nice if you said if they are effecient for air flow or not.
1. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (My favorite)
2.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A PSU I saw that looks very nice is - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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August 10, 2013 7:13:18 AM

BTW $200 is just a estimate without shipping, so about $250 max a case and PSU + Shipping

Some cases I found, would be nice if you said if they are effecient for air flow or not.
1. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (My favorite)
2.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A PSU I saw that looks very nice is - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b U Graphics card
August 10, 2013 12:05:33 PM

Rafi Santiago said:
BTW $200 is just a estimate without shipping, so about $250 max a case and PSU + Shipping

Some cases I found, would be nice if you said if they are effecient for air flow or not.
1. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (My favorite)
2.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A PSU I saw that looks very nice is - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Well, I'm glad you are doing okay with your GPU. Be aware though, for GPUs, more VRAM isn't always better. You need the render back-ends (ROPS) to actually make good use of all that VRAM and you need the VRAM bandwidth (both width and speed) to actually fill that VRAM in the time required. The HD7750 doesn't really need more than 1GB of VRAM, because it only has so much render back-ends and is clocked rather low. By the time you actually need more than 1GB of VRAM to store whatever, the GPU has ran out of steam in a desperate attempt to fill that much VRAM. DDR3 is also half as fast as GDDR5 at the same clock. The GDDR5 versions of the HD7750 has the VRAM clocked at least 4.5 Ghz (effective clock), your DDR3 version is clocked at 1.6 Ghz for the VRAM, so the bandwidth on the GDDR5 version is at least 2.8 times more. In other words, the DDR3 edition is nearly 1/3rd the memory bandwidth of the full speed version. All that really means is that at low resolutions and settings, the two cards will be roughly the same, but at higher resolutions (1080p, for example) and higher settings (especially AA), the DDR3 version will be a LOT slower. This is just a FYI, since you have already bought the card. I don't think there is a better value than spending another 10-15 dollars to get nearly 3 times the memory bandwidth...

As for your case choices, those are all really really big cases. I don't know if you are aware of that already. Most of the people I know who have used the HAF, for example, are walking away from it, because it is just ridiculously big. Just as well, I'm not sure your case is a standard ATX from the pictures you took. The motherboard is mounted (what looks like in your pics) on the opposite side of the case, with the expansion slots at the middle of the case. That looks like BTX. I don't know if your mobo will physically install into an ATX case (only a very few BTX boards do, once you flip them, without problems, that is).

And about your PSU, anything Seasonic is a top notch choice, at a price, of course. If you prefer Corsair, nearly everything Corsair these days is a good choice. The cheaper CX series will do just fine, and you can usually snatch up a good CX500 for really cheap (like 30 dollars or so) when they go on sale at various places. Avoid CoolerMaster. Antec is not as high in quality (in parts, capacitors for example) as Corsair for the same money.
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August 10, 2013 2:15:09 PM

Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
BTW $200 is just a estimate without shipping, so about $250 max a case and PSU + Shipping

Some cases I found, would be nice if you said if they are effecient for air flow or not.
1. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (My favorite)
2.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A PSU I saw that looks very nice is - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Well, I'm glad you are doing okay with your GPU. Be aware though, for GPUs, more VRAM isn't always better. You need the render back-ends (ROPS) to actually make good use of all that VRAM and you need the VRAM bandwidth (both width and speed) to actually fill that VRAM in the time required. The HD7750 doesn't really need more than 1GB of VRAM, because it only has so much render back-ends and is clocked rather low. By the time you actually need more than 1GB of VRAM to store whatever, the GPU has ran out of steam in a desperate attempt to fill that much VRAM. DDR3 is also half as fast as GDDR5 at the same clock. The GDDR5 versions of the HD7750 has the VRAM clocked at least 4.5 Ghz (effective clock), your DDR3 version is clocked at 1.6 Ghz for the VRAM, so the bandwidth on the GDDR5 version is at least 2.8 times more. In other words, the DDR3 edition is nearly 1/3rd the memory bandwidth of the full speed version. All that really means is that at low resolutions and settings, the two cards will be roughly the same, but at higher resolutions (1080p, for example) and higher settings (especially AA), the DDR3 version will be a LOT slower. This is just a FYI, since you have already bought the card. I don't think there is a better value than spending another 10-15 dollars to get nearly 3 times the memory bandwidth...

As for your case choices, those are all really really big cases. I don't know if you are aware of that already. Most of the people I know who have used the HAF, for example, are walking away from it, because it is just ridiculously big. Just as well, I'm not sure your case is a standard ATX from the pictures you took. The motherboard is mounted (what looks like in your pics) on the opposite side of the case, with the expansion slots at the middle of the case. That looks like BTX. I don't know if your mobo will physically install into an ATX case (only a very few BTX boards do, once you flip them, without problems, that is).

And about your PSU, anything Seasonic is a top notch choice, at a price, of course. If you prefer Corsair, nearly everything Corsair these days is a good choice. The cheaper CX series will do just fine, and you can usually snatch up a good CX500 for really cheap (like 30 dollars or so) when they go on sale at various places. Avoid CoolerMaster. Antec is not as high in quality (in parts, capacitors for example) as Corsair for the same money.


Well I am doing fine running games at the max settings with AA at max , such as x16 AA and stuff. I play at 1600x900, and I have no problem so whats done is done :p . As for the case, The size doesn't matter to me at all really, mine is small and I really want a bigger one because I like the case to have space. My motherboard is on the right side, and the expansion are on the right side. So the Motherboard is mounted on the left side (if u look at the front of a case head foward) which is opposite compared to most cases (HP...your so annoying )

About the PSU, Corsair and Seasonic will be what I am looking for, because my 300W is fine, but if I want some fans connected directly with the PSU or some stuff, I need a 400W so then I am sure I have enough power, and more compatibility.

So I searched, and apparently HP and Dell do this alot with the Mobo's, and its hard to switch and almost impossible. What should I do now? This is my back - http://pisces.bbystatic.com/image/BestBuy_US/images/pro...;canvasHeight=280;canvasWidth=280

Except the orange circle port under the VGA, I have more USB Ports, etc.

So that is the back, and you see 2 removable slots, and 2 like non-removable (Idk, smashed one with a screw driver, fell out, made the GPU fit perfect, who knew?) so the bottom 2 of them (above audio ports) are my GPU, and the 2 above that is the air space (open slots) and u can see my metal mesh (I really need to get rid of it, good thing im not on some heavy gaming right now) So can I change cases? if so, where do i find a BTX or ATX case that matches. All BTX i saw were discontinued and ATX is all that I see sold.
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a b U Graphics card
August 10, 2013 3:48:48 PM

Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
BTW $200 is just a estimate without shipping, so about $250 max a case and PSU + Shipping

Some cases I found, would be nice if you said if they are effecient for air flow or not.
1. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (My favorite)
2.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A PSU I saw that looks very nice is - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Well, I'm glad you are doing okay with your GPU. Be aware though, for GPUs, more VRAM isn't always better. You need the render back-ends (ROPS) to actually make good use of all that VRAM and you need the VRAM bandwidth (both width and speed) to actually fill that VRAM in the time required. The HD7750 doesn't really need more than 1GB of VRAM, because it only has so much render back-ends and is clocked rather low. By the time you actually need more than 1GB of VRAM to store whatever, the GPU has ran out of steam in a desperate attempt to fill that much VRAM. DDR3 is also half as fast as GDDR5 at the same clock. The GDDR5 versions of the HD7750 has the VRAM clocked at least 4.5 Ghz (effective clock), your DDR3 version is clocked at 1.6 Ghz for the VRAM, so the bandwidth on the GDDR5 version is at least 2.8 times more. In other words, the DDR3 edition is nearly 1/3rd the memory bandwidth of the full speed version. All that really means is that at low resolutions and settings, the two cards will be roughly the same, but at higher resolutions (1080p, for example) and higher settings (especially AA), the DDR3 version will be a LOT slower. This is just a FYI, since you have already bought the card. I don't think there is a better value than spending another 10-15 dollars to get nearly 3 times the memory bandwidth...

As for your case choices, those are all really really big cases. I don't know if you are aware of that already. Most of the people I know who have used the HAF, for example, are walking away from it, because it is just ridiculously big. Just as well, I'm not sure your case is a standard ATX from the pictures you took. The motherboard is mounted (what looks like in your pics) on the opposite side of the case, with the expansion slots at the middle of the case. That looks like BTX. I don't know if your mobo will physically install into an ATX case (only a very few BTX boards do, once you flip them, without problems, that is).

And about your PSU, anything Seasonic is a top notch choice, at a price, of course. If you prefer Corsair, nearly everything Corsair these days is a good choice. The cheaper CX series will do just fine, and you can usually snatch up a good CX500 for really cheap (like 30 dollars or so) when they go on sale at various places. Avoid CoolerMaster. Antec is not as high in quality (in parts, capacitors for example) as Corsair for the same money.


Well I am doing fine running games at the max settings with AA at max , such as x16 AA and stuff. I play at 1600x900, and I have no problem so whats done is done :p . As for the case, The size doesn't matter to me at all really, mine is small and I really want a bigger one because I like the case to have space. My motherboard is on the right side, and the expansion are on the right side. So the Motherboard is mounted on the left side (if u look at the front of a case head foward) which is opposite compared to most cases (HP...your so annoying )

About the PSU, Corsair and Seasonic will be what I am looking for, because my 300W is fine, but if I want some fans connected directly with the PSU or some stuff, I need a 400W so then I am sure I have enough power, and more compatibility.

So I searched, and apparently HP and Dell do this alot with the Mobo's, and its hard to switch and almost impossible. What should I do now? This is my back - http://pisces.bbystatic.com/image/BestBuy_US/images/pro...;canvasHeight=280;canvasWidth=280

Except the orange circle port under the VGA, I have more USB Ports, etc.

So that is the back, and you see 2 removable slots, and 2 like non-removable (Idk, smashed one with a screw driver, fell out, made the GPU fit perfect, who knew?) so the bottom 2 of them (above audio ports) are my GPU, and the 2 above that is the air space (open slots) and u can see my metal mesh (I really need to get rid of it, good thing im not on some heavy gaming right now) So can I change cases? if so, where do i find a BTX or ATX case that matches. All BTX i saw were discontinued and ATX is all that I see sold.


Yeah, your case definitely looks like a BTX design. You can check to see if your BTX will actually fit in an ATX case, some earlier BTX boards are actually able to fit into ATX cases if you just flipped them.

BTX never took off in the DIY market, so large manufacturers never produced consumer grade BTX boards, and thus, no cases either. If you have a BTX, you are pretty much stuck with the case you have, and if you want more cooling, you can mod the case to its full potential. That's about it. There isn't much aftermarket (actually, nearly none) for BTX specific stuff.

You can toss in a more powerful PSU. The PSU looks to be a standard ATX PSU by its mounting holes and dimensions.

Either way, why not save up some money until you build a new computer ? Then you can choose all the parts you want, and won't have to be stuck with some obscure standard.
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August 10, 2013 6:31:01 PM

Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
BTW $200 is just a estimate without shipping, so about $250 max a case and PSU + Shipping

Some cases I found, would be nice if you said if they are effecient for air flow or not.
1. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... (My favorite)
2.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
3.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A PSU I saw that looks very nice is - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Well, I'm glad you are doing okay with your GPU. Be aware though, for GPUs, more VRAM isn't always better. You need the render back-ends (ROPS) to actually make good use of all that VRAM and you need the VRAM bandwidth (both width and speed) to actually fill that VRAM in the time required. The HD7750 doesn't really need more than 1GB of VRAM, because it only has so much render back-ends and is clocked rather low. By the time you actually need more than 1GB of VRAM to store whatever, the GPU has ran out of steam in a desperate attempt to fill that much VRAM. DDR3 is also half as fast as GDDR5 at the same clock. The GDDR5 versions of the HD7750 has the VRAM clocked at least 4.5 Ghz (effective clock), your DDR3 version is clocked at 1.6 Ghz for the VRAM, so the bandwidth on the GDDR5 version is at least 2.8 times more. In other words, the DDR3 edition is nearly 1/3rd the memory bandwidth of the full speed version. All that really means is that at low resolutions and settings, the two cards will be roughly the same, but at higher resolutions (1080p, for example) and higher settings (especially AA), the DDR3 version will be a LOT slower. This is just a FYI, since you have already bought the card. I don't think there is a better value than spending another 10-15 dollars to get nearly 3 times the memory bandwidth...

As for your case choices, those are all really really big cases. I don't know if you are aware of that already. Most of the people I know who have used the HAF, for example, are walking away from it, because it is just ridiculously big. Just as well, I'm not sure your case is a standard ATX from the pictures you took. The motherboard is mounted (what looks like in your pics) on the opposite side of the case, with the expansion slots at the middle of the case. That looks like BTX. I don't know if your mobo will physically install into an ATX case (only a very few BTX boards do, once you flip them, without problems, that is).

And about your PSU, anything Seasonic is a top notch choice, at a price, of course. If you prefer Corsair, nearly everything Corsair these days is a good choice. The cheaper CX series will do just fine, and you can usually snatch up a good CX500 for really cheap (like 30 dollars or so) when they go on sale at various places. Avoid CoolerMaster. Antec is not as high in quality (in parts, capacitors for example) as Corsair for the same money.


Well I am doing fine running games at the max settings with AA at max , such as x16 AA and stuff. I play at 1600x900, and I have no problem so whats done is done :p . As for the case, The size doesn't matter to me at all really, mine is small and I really want a bigger one because I like the case to have space. My motherboard is on the right side, and the expansion are on the right side. So the Motherboard is mounted on the left side (if u look at the front of a case head foward) which is opposite compared to most cases (HP...your so annoying )

About the PSU, Corsair and Seasonic will be what I am looking for, because my 300W is fine, but if I want some fans connected directly with the PSU or some stuff, I need a 400W so then I am sure I have enough power, and more compatibility.

So I searched, and apparently HP and Dell do this alot with the Mobo's, and its hard to switch and almost impossible. What should I do now? This is my back - http://pisces.bbystatic.com/image/BestBuy_US/images/pro...;canvasHeight=280;canvasWidth=280

Except the orange circle port under the VGA, I have more USB Ports, etc.

So that is the back, and you see 2 removable slots, and 2 like non-removable (Idk, smashed one with a screw driver, fell out, made the GPU fit perfect, who knew?) so the bottom 2 of them (above audio ports) are my GPU, and the 2 above that is the air space (open slots) and u can see my metal mesh (I really need to get rid of it, good thing im not on some heavy gaming right now) So can I change cases? if so, where do i find a BTX or ATX case that matches. All BTX i saw were discontinued and ATX is all that I see sold.


Yeah, your case definitely looks like a BTX design. You can check to see if your BTX will actually fit in an ATX case, some earlier BTX boards are actually able to fit into ATX cases if you just flipped them.

BTX never took off in the DIY market, so large manufacturers never produced consumer grade BTX boards, and thus, no cases either. If you have a BTX, you are pretty much stuck with the case you have, and if you want more cooling, you can mod the case to its full potential. That's about it. There isn't much aftermarket (actually, nearly none) for BTX specific stuff.

You can toss in a more powerful PSU. The PSU looks to be a standard ATX PSU by its mounting holes and dimensions.

Either way, why not save up some money until you build a new computer ? Then you can choose all the parts you want, and won't have to be stuck with some obscure standard.

If I get the money to make one myself, thats 2014 like done with parts at the end of July or so xD (not joking....kinda have to wait. I can buy parts at time every month or few months though and save them up) And the PSU is a standard ATX, I checked the dimensions.

I think I am going to try to get a new PC part every month or so, because I will have this desktop maybe for a year. I do not know exactly, it can last MUCH More than a year, as my old horrible HP laptop lasted a good 2 years before I got this Desktop so I know this guy will last longer.. So by then or maybe before, I will have all the parts needed.

-Case - $110 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-Mobo (Which is best?, One for atleast one GPU and fits in that case Up to $150 possibly?
-PSU - 360W - SeaSonic - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $60
-8GB of Ram - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $70
-DVD Drive - Current.
-CPU - $120 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-GPU - Same one, unless upgrade after built.
-Hard Drive - Same one. Just transfer it.
-Keyboard - $30 - http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ASPNYDM?psc=1
-Mouse - $10 - http://www.amazon.com/E-3lue-EMS109BK-Precision-Control...
-Monitor - Same 20" one.

$550 is the maximum it can cost really (without shipping) , so if you know some like NORMAL PRICES (because if its a deal, its gonna end, and I wont be getting it anytime soon really...) that are nice, send me it on this thread. This is just stuff I found and I really think it might work, and btw, I am trying to make it all match (blue) except like the ram and stuff etc. :3 So yeah...
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August 11, 2013 4:20:32 AM

+ Removed the metal mesh. The air output is amazing compared to before :) 
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a b U Graphics card
August 11, 2013 7:37:53 AM

Rafi Santiago said:
+ Removed the metal mesh. The air output is amazing compared to before :) 


Congrats! Probably the simplest thing to do on a brand name box to improve air flow these days...

For your parts, I think the best idea is to snatch up heavily discounted items when possible over the next few months. The end of the year usually comes with heavy discounts to move inventory. What I usually do is to wait for sales, and buy an item I will use fairly soon. I managed to buy a 3570K for 159.99 a long while back, and an Intel 520 240GB SSD for 169.99, an Intel 330 240GB SSD for 139.99, two awesome DangerDen acrylic cases for about 20 bucks each (going out of business sale), and so on. Doing things this way, a piece at a time when they are on sale really saves you a lot of money. You also need the flexibility to buy whenever the sale goes on (so hold on to your money for a short bit), and don't be too exact with a model number (i.e., if a Corsair PSU that is 500 W goes on sale, and you wanted a 450 W mdoel, don't hesitate).

Have you also tried www.ncix.com and www.tigerdirect.com, and even Amazon has amazing deals once in a while.
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August 11, 2013 2:02:50 PM

Maxx_Power said:
Rafi Santiago said:
+ Removed the metal mesh. The air output is amazing compared to before :) 


Congrats! Probably the simplest thing to do on a brand name box to improve air flow these days...

For your parts, I think the best idea is to snatch up heavily discounted items when possible over the next few months. The end of the year usually comes with heavy discounts to move inventory. What I usually do is to wait for sales, and buy an item I will use fairly soon. I managed to buy a 3570K for 159.99 a long while back, and an Intel 520 240GB SSD for 169.99, an Intel 330 240GB SSD for 139.99, two awesome DangerDen acrylic cases for about 20 bucks each (going out of business sale), and so on. Doing things this way, a piece at a time when they are on sale really saves you a lot of money. You also need the flexibility to buy whenever the sale goes on (so hold on to your money for a short bit), and don't be too exact with a model number (i.e., if a Corsair PSU that is 500 W goes on sale, and you wanted a 450 W mdoel, don't hesitate).

Have you also tried www.ncix.com and www.tigerdirect.com, and even Amazon has amazing deals once in a while.


No I haven't but now I will. Also I am flexible with that, like for RAM, as long as it has a nice speed, its 8GB, and is trustworthy, I can get it. For PSU, I need 300W or above, doesn't matter alot but the HP one, I just don't like really. Hard Drives, 500GB or above, I am flexible with that kind of stuff. Now I saw alot of PC Gaming Rigs for $____ on YouTube. All of them recommending Intel CPU's, which cost like $200 extra, for 5FPS more basicly. The AMD CPU's (or APU's) are about $105 for the A8-5500 (and goes on $65 FREQUENTLY) so AMD is much cheaper, and my preffered choice. (Nvidea is always a contender, I never tried them but they are awesome for the Mobile Tablets Tegra 3 Processors) so, Anything else you recommend. I am going to buy some parts at a time, I prefer to get PC parts first rather than the stuff like a keyboard/mouse, and if I dont want to get a new one like I put, I can always use my existing
ones (even though if a desktop will take months to buy/get, i want to have everything nice, except my monitor, its already okay)
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August 11, 2013 2:06:37 PM

Can you help find a Motherboard for that certain case?
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August 11, 2013 2:56:43 PM

New Plan, and its gonna stay same case. But Mobo can change, I just like USBs and ports to have 'em. I prefer MSI (mostly) motherboards. if you know some good ATX case ones for that case, that would be great! With the ports on the Top Left of the back of the case.


-Case - $110 - http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...
-Mobo - http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite... - $100
-PSU - 360W - SeaSonic - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $60
-8GB of Ram - http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite... $70
-DVD Drive - Current.
-CPU - $100- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-GPU - Same one, unless upgrade after built.
-Hard Drive - Same one. Just transfer it.
-Keyboard - $30 - http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ASPNYDM?psc=1
-Mouse - $10 - http://www.amazon.com/E-3lue-EMS109BK-Precision-Control...
-Monitor - Same 20" one.
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August 11, 2013 5:40:36 PM

Can my current GPU with the current air flow last a year or more? I still feel like...something might go wrong
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a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2013 7:05:06 AM

Rafi Santiago said:
New Plan, and its gonna stay same case. But Mobo can change, I just like USBs and ports to have 'em. I prefer MSI (mostly) motherboards. if you know some good ATX case ones for that case, that would be great! With the ports on the Top Left of the back of the case.


-Case - $110 - http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...
-Mobo - http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite... - $100
-PSU - 360W - SeaSonic - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - $60
-8GB of Ram - http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite... $70
-DVD Drive - Current.
-CPU - $100- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-GPU - Same one, unless upgrade after built.
-Hard Drive - Same one. Just transfer it.
-Keyboard - $30 - http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00ASPNYDM?psc=1
-Mouse - $10 - http://www.amazon.com/E-3lue-EMS109BK-Precision-Control...
-Monitor - Same 20" one.


Be careful with the CPU and Mobo choices. The CPU is a FM2 socket CPU while the board is an AM3+ socket. The CPU won't fit on that board. If you are not in a rush to buy the CPU+board, I would wait on that part as long as you can. The FM2 platform is pretty much outdated at this point of time, because Kaveri (next gen APUs) will use FM2+ sockets that will not be (generally) backwards compatible with FM2. As for AM3+ platforms, the new Steamroller cores are just around the corner as well. Essentially, if you already have a GPU, don't go with the APUs. APUs = low to mid performance AMD CPU + low to mid performance AMD GPU. You are paying extra money for the useless GPU and getting an underwhelming CPU in the process as well. Go straight for the FX series and AM3+, since you have a much faster GPU already, you don't need the integrated GPU on the APUs.

If you are just looking to game, the AMD CPUs (AM3+ FX chips) will be fine. The upcoming (in a few months, this year) Steamroller will replace the current Piledriver FX chips soon, and you'll receive both a price reduction on the existing CPUs and a performance increase in the new chips. Then you get to choose what you want.

As for memory, these AMD FX chips supports 1866 Mhz RAM natively. You may want to wait until AMD releases the new Steamroller FX chips to see what kind of RAM is best for them.

Everything else, like PSU, case, SSD+HDD (whatever combo you want), keyboard+mouse, etc, you should be able to purchase as you see a good sale on something you want.
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a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2013 7:09:59 AM

As for your GPU temperatures and longevity, what are you current idle and load GPU temperatures ?
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August 12, 2013 9:41:35 AM

Idle = 32-34 Celcius
Load (Heavy Gaming) = 43-45 Celcius. Haven't seen anything above that.
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a b U Graphics card
August 12, 2013 12:58:54 PM

Those are fine temperatures. There is no need to worry then.
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August 12, 2013 4:45:00 PM

I have been noticing, when I first got the graphics card. I did perfect at 30-50 Frames on High settings on GTA IV, now I have lag sometimes and hit 15 Frames sometimes, even when the GPU is at its normal Load tempetures, now lowering to Medium doesn't do a difference really or low. Or change the resolution. They all go about the same Frame rate (which is kind of weird) for GTA IV. On other games, this problem is non existant, as I have no real issues with other games.
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a b U Graphics card
August 13, 2013 7:07:37 AM

Rafi Santiago said:
I have been noticing, when I first got the graphics card. I did perfect at 30-50 Frames on High settings on GTA IV, now I have lag sometimes and hit 15 Frames sometimes, even when the GPU is at its normal Load tempetures, now lowering to Medium doesn't do a difference really or low. Or change the resolution. They all go about the same Frame rate (which is kind of weird) for GTA IV. On other games, this problem is non existant, as I have no real issues with other games.


Check to see if your CPU temperatures are getting too high. If so, clean the heatsink (do it anyway) and fan assembly. Try going to power in the control panel and see if setting the option to high power solves anything. Other than that, it could be a perceptual thing, different scenes and areas tax the GPU/CPU differently and do not usually yield the same FPS.
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August 13, 2013 10:27:44 AM

Thank you for the last sentence (different scenes and areas tax the GPU/CPU differently) because I noticed on Singe Player, I have no problems reaching 40-60FPS on highest settings on GTA IV. But then when I play with friends on Multiplayer, I either have to play on High at 720p, or Medium at my native 1600x900 resolution to get a nice FPS 30-60.
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August 13, 2013 2:54:20 PM

Rafi Santiago said:
Thank you for the last sentence (different scenes and areas tax the GPU/CPU differently) because I noticed on Singe Player, I have no problems reaching 40-60FPS on highest settings on GTA IV. But then when I play with friends on Multiplayer, I either have to play on High at 720p, or Medium at my native 1600x900 resolution to get a nice FPS 30-60.


You are welcome. Multiplayer modes usually have less FPS than single player modes for most games. One of the most notorious is BF3, where MP modes are vastly slower than SP modes, since the required CPU power is much higher. Another reason why to go with an AM3+ or Intel setup for CPU intensive games, AMD APUs and lower end AM3+ chips don't do so well in CPU intensive games.
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August 13, 2013 5:44:30 PM

I put my settings nicer , but the GPU plays AC Brotherhood at Maxed Out on Multiplayer, and other games medium-high. GTA Episodes runs at 20-40FPS on medium at native resolution. And games like Skyrim (Maxed Out) or games like Blacklight Retribution (maxed) are perfect. This GPU fulfills all my needs (Even Saints Row the third on High at 30FPS)
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