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core i7 3930k vs core i7 4770k

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August 9, 2013 2:19:34 PM

Hi all, can i ask you something? What do you think about core i7 3930K vs 4770K? Which you would pick if you should pair it with an GTX 780, and you could use the CPU for virtualization and cloud computing?

More about : core 3930k core 4770k

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August 9, 2013 2:27:00 PM

In your case, I would want the 3930k. It is a faster chip overall.
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August 9, 2013 2:33:23 PM

The main difference is cost as the LGA 2011 platform will be more expenxive then the LGA 1150 so right off the bat you have to dcide on what your willing to spend.
After that you want to look at motherboards since they are different sockets your going to get a different feature set for each and there will be some same features but the high end 2011 socket board will have more.
The main difference between the two is that the 2011 socket with the X-79 chipset is going to give you 40 lanes of Pci-e bandwidth for true x16 for dual video cards. The 1150 socket and z-87 chipset has 16 lanes total to split up.
The other difference is the ease in which you can overclock the 2011 CPU. I have the 3930k on the Asus Rampage IV Extreme and I got a 4.5ghz overclock without hardly trying and there is room for a lot more.
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August 9, 2013 2:34:52 PM

If money was not object, sure the 3930k would be "better". Question is... what kind of load? how many VMs and such are you working at the same time? In my experience thus far (with vmware workstation) is the cpu is rarely the slowest wheel. If money is no concern, then plan on a nice array of drives or multiple ssds and a boat load of memory to go along with your shiney new 3930k.

The question you need answer is, what exactly are you using it for, specificly.
If your gaming with a little vm on the side, go with haswell and save the money for a graphics card.

If your primary virutalbox'n , heavy like, then 3930 + raid/ssd/+memory.
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August 9, 2013 2:42:57 PM

inzone said:
The main difference is cost as the LGA 2011 platform will be more expenxive then the LGA 1150 so right off the bat you have to dcide on what your willing to spend.
After that you want to look at motherboards since they are different sockets your going to get a different feature set for each and there will be some same features but the high end 2011 socket board will have more.
The main difference between the two is that the 2011 socket with the X-79 chipset is going to give you 40 lanes of Pci-e bandwidth for true x16 for dual video cards. The 1150 socket and z-87 chipset has 16 lanes total to split up.
The other difference is the ease in which you can overclock the 2011 CPU. I have the 3930k on the Asus Rampage IV Extreme and I got a 4.5ghz overclock without hardly trying and there is room for a lot more.


As I read last week, those sockets 2011 are going to be able to handle the next gen ivy bridge core i7 4930X and above CPUs. Is this information correct? Beacuse if yes, i am going to stick with the 3930k and take an asus p9x79 deluxe motherboard.
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August 9, 2013 5:24:58 PM

Yes this information is correct as far as what has been released for the upcoming Ivy Bridge-E CPU. I have read several articles that confirm that the Ivy Bridge-E will use the same 2011 socket of existing motherboards and will require a bios update. There is even some talk of the Haswell-E may also use that socket but that is far away and may be changed by then.
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a c 210 à CPUs
August 9, 2013 6:35:20 PM

One thing to keep in mind would be that all Intel "k" series CPUs have a great deal of the virtualization features turned off. The 2 CPUs that would offer the virtualization features on standard Intel CPUs would be the i7-3820 Quad Core, and the i7-3960x/3970x.

Of the 2 aforementioned CPUs, the 3960x/3970x is unlocked and has the virtualization features turned on. Though it's mega-pricey...depending on what kind of virtual box you want to run, it may be worth it to get the virtualization features.

An alternative that may make sense if you're running a moderately large scale number of virtual boxes would be to go with a full tower and a Xeon setup. Though I couldn't comment as to what the comparable performance cost would be. The Xeon setup would also not be good for gaming...at all...so there's that.

There are a lot of variables in play here...do your research and see what makes sense for you.

Though, to answer your initial question directly without the other variables:

For all intents and purposes choosing between those 2, the 3930k is better hands down.
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October 12, 2013 9:26:09 AM

What "k" series CPUs are you talking about. The ONLY diff between the i7-3930K and the i7-3960X/3970X are Clock Speed, Max Turbo Speed, Cache and TDP. ALL the other specs are identical including the Advanced Tech specs which include Virtualization features. I have VMware ESXi 5.1 running bare metal on 2 i7-3930K boxes with ASRock motherboards as we speak. Didn't even need to pre-load drivers. The i7-3930K makes a great lab box for VM systems at a reasonable cost.

2011 boxes will typically cost more at the CPU, Motherboard and possibly memory level. The reason to in vest is easy, MORE CORES/THREADS to execute stuff. Why would you need this? Either you are running VM systems for a lab at home like me OR you are a heavy gamer and your OS/Games can take advantage of the technology OR you do some pretty heavy Video Editing OR you just like to tinker with great technology. Otherwise, you will be happy with a 4 Core i7 box and the cost to build it will be cheaper.

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October 13, 2013 8:51:18 AM

never2manyvms said:
What "k" series CPUs are you talking about. The ONLY diff between the i7-3930K and the i7-3960X/3970X are Clock Speed, Max Turbo Speed, Cache and TDP. ALL the other specs are identical including the Advanced Tech specs which include Virtualization features. I have VMware ESXi 5.1 running bare metal on 2 i7-3930K boxes with ASRock motherboards as we speak. Didn't even need to pre-load drivers. The i7-3930K makes a great lab box for VM systems at a reasonable cost.

2011 boxes will typically cost more at the CPU, Motherboard and possibly memory level. The reason to in vest is easy, MORE CORES/THREADS to execute stuff. Why would you need this? Either you are running VM systems for a lab at home like me OR you are a heavy gamer and your OS/Games can take advantage of the technology OR you do some pretty heavy Video Editing OR you just like to tinker with great technology. Otherwise, you will be happy with a 4 Core i7 box and the cost to build it will be cheaper.



I know the 3570k/4670k/3770k/4770k all had VT-d and several other virtualization features disabled. From my knowledge, the 3930k does as well, though I could double check it to re-verify that.
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October 13, 2013 8:54:14 AM

I have the i7-3930k and the Virtualization feature is there and its enabled. I don't use it but it's still there.
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October 23, 2013 10:23:49 AM

inzone said:
I have the i7-3930k and the Virtualization feature is there and its enabled. I don't use it but it's still there.

Well, i went for the 4770k. And it is monster :p  I love this CPU :) 
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October 23, 2013 9:06:20 PM

There's no doubt that it is and it's a good choice, nothing like buying components and being happy with the decision.
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October 24, 2013 4:06:23 AM

inzone said:
There's no doubt that it is and it's a good choice, nothing like buying components and being happy with the decision.


What i am right now is thinking about is. That i have a noctua nh d-14 air cooling, and maybe i will go after a full set of water cooling. Maybe the Nzxt Kraken x40 or Corsair Cooling Hydro Series H90. To reduce the weight what is on my cpu and mobo too. What do you think? :) 
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October 24, 2013 7:29:19 AM

I will say that the Noctua D-14 does actually compete with the closed loop coolers in cooling power but the sheer size of the thing is what's the issue. The securing mechanism does a good job supporting the heat sink and the back plate combined with the points were the board is screwed in can keep the board from bending.

If you want to go for the closed loop to free up some space and stress then that's certainly something that you can do and it's your choice to go that way. I think a lot will depend on what you have for a motherboard. If you have an Asus or Gigabyte then those boards are generally solid and thicker then others so they will not have a problem holding the D-14. Any other brand and I would consider the closed loop.

You certainly don't have to rush out and get the closed loop cooler and you can take your time and get the one you want. If you plan on overclocking then it would also be a consideration to go for the closed loop as it would dissipate the heat better.
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October 28, 2013 3:16:56 PM

inzone said:
I will say that the Noctua D-14 does actually compete with the closed loop coolers in cooling power but the sheer size of the thing is what's the issue. The securing mechanism does a good job supporting the heat sink and the back plate combined with the points were the board is screwed in can keep the board from bending.

If you want to go for the closed loop to free up some space and stress then that's certainly something that you can do and it's your choice to go that way. I think a lot will depend on what you have for a motherboard. If you have an Asus or Gigabyte then those boards are generally solid and thicker then others so they will not have a problem holding the D-14. Any other brand and I would consider the closed loop.

You certainly don't have to rush out and get the closed loop cooler and you can take your time and get the one you want. If you plan on overclocking then it would also be a consideration to go for the closed loop as it would dissipate the heat better.


I have an Asus Maximus VI Extreme motherboard. And I am planning to overclock my cpu for testung purpose for 4GHz. Thanks for your very good answer. And you are right the noctua cooler can compete with the closed loope systems, but I really want to decrease the space what takes up my noctua. But on the other hand, if those two types water cooling system are gonna be much louder, than the noctua is right now, then i am not sure if i am gonne take them. But if i am not really overclocking my cpu just for 4GHz, then maybe they will be not such loud as.
I am a little bit confused :-)
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October 28, 2013 8:31:27 PM

The Noctua has two fans just like the dual rad closed loop coolers. Fans can be changed and there are many that do not have a high decibel number. If your looking for and willing to change the fans then you can get a low decibel fan that has a high static air pressure and get great cooling performance from he closed loop.
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October 29, 2013 12:35:14 PM

inzone said:
The Noctua has two fans just like the dual rad closed loop coolers. Fans can be changed and there are many that do not have a high decibel number. If your looking for and willing to change the fans then you can get a low decibel fan that has a high static air pressure and get great cooling performance from he closed loop.


Any idea what 140 fans are good enough for a closed loop water cooling that can replace the stock fan from the nzxt kraken x40 or corsair h90? because they have PWM abilities and run almost 3000 rpm. i couldn't find proper noctua fans with pwm and high static air pressure. by the way i very appriciate your help
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October 30, 2013 8:43:55 PM

That is an excellent fan and has good static air pressure.
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October 31, 2013 3:27:55 PM

inzone said:
That is an excellent fan and has good static air pressure.


I really appreciate your help. You are very helpful. My last question :)  What dou you think about those two closed loop water coolers. Which one to choose :)  Both are excellent, but you are an expert. You have a better opinion.
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October 31, 2013 4:44:03 PM

Nzxt Kraken x40 or Corsair Cooling Hydro Series H90. These two ?

I would go with the Nzxt Kraken x40 , it is a 4 pin pwm setup and can have two fans mounted for extra cooling power if needed and when at idle the bios can power it lower to lower the noise level.
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November 1, 2013 3:48:03 PM

inzone said:
Nzxt Kraken x40 or Corsair Cooling Hydro Series H90. These two ?

I would go with the Nzxt Kraken x40 , it is a 4 pin pwm setup and can have two fans mounted for extra cooling power if needed and when at idle the bios can power it lower to lower the noise level.


You are really a Boss in the cpu problematic :)  it is awesome to know you.I will go for the nzxt kraken x40 and for the noctua coolers.thank you very much. I woul like to talk you kore further,but you have much more serious work to do.So once again thank you :) 
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November 1, 2013 5:56:42 PM

Glad to help.
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November 13, 2013 3:22:05 AM

inzone said:
Glad to help.


OK, i replaced my noctua nh d-14 to nzxt kraken x40. It worked like a charm. Then as we mentioned i replaced the fan to noctuas A-15. The Control Center of NZXT Kraken is OK, but somehow, it is not cooling better, as I was expecting. When the stock fan was working I was at 29-30 degrees, now with the noctua with better airflow etc i am at 35-38 degrees. Why it is happening? :o 
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November 13, 2013 9:48:01 AM

You will have to compare the specs of the two fans to see if there is a difference in performance. aslo try connecting the fan to the cpu socket if you haven't done that and let the bios control it.
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November 13, 2013 1:20:04 PM

inzone said:
You will have to compare the specs of the two fans to see if there is a difference in performance. aslo try connecting the fan to the cpu socket if you haven't done that and let the bios control it.


Aha, so you suggest me to, disconnect from the socket what is within the nzxt kraken x40 and connect it mainly to the cpu socket? But there is the power supply for the pump of the kraken x40.

At mean time i took an advantage of that i have two fans so placed the NZXT fan behind the radiator and in front of the radiator the noctua A-15.

The NZXT fan is connected to the nzxt socket provided within the cooling system and the noctua is connected to the mobo OPT CPU FAN socket. Because as i mentioned the main is taken by the 3-pin power supply of the nzxt pump.
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November 13, 2013 1:34:11 PM

So with the two fans on the radiator you are getting higher temps then with the Nochtua D14 ? Only because I can't see what you have set up I have to ask if you have the two fans blowing in the same direction? The front fan blowing into the radiator and the back fan blowing away from the radiator.
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November 13, 2013 3:32:39 PM

inzone said:
So with the two fans on the radiator you are getting higher temps then with the Nochtua D14 ? Only because I can't see what you have set up I have to ask if you have the two fans blowing in the same direction? The front fan blowing into the radiator and the back fan blowing away from the radiator.


Yes the set up is that what you have written.The same directions, and right now the hw monitor is showing me the temps:
- package: 36
- core1 until 4: 33-36
- cpu: 32
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November 13, 2013 3:45:45 PM

HW monitor is not very good at measuring temps. Try Real temp, I use it and found that my temps were read much more accurate. HW monitor was awful.
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November 19, 2013 12:59:55 PM

inzone said:
HW monitor is not very good at measuring temps. Try Real temp, I use it and found that my temps were read much more accurate. HW monitor was awful.


Ok i am a little-bit confused. I was running intel burn test, with very high stress level, and getting these temperatures, with water cooling NZXT Kraken x40 I have got a stock fan behind the radiator with max RPM about 3000 and an Noctua A-15 infront of it with max 1500 RPM. I think it is too high for a water cooling system. Should i RMA, because i did every thing in correct steps.

Picture about my system
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November 19, 2013 1:24:38 PM

Yes those temps are fine and the reason they are ok is because you were doing a burn in test which will stress the CPU at 100%. This is the highest temps that you will ever see and there is nothing else that you can do outside of a full stress test that will cause the temps to match what you have in that screen shot.
BF4 might cause you to see low 70's maybe and your still over 25c away from TJmax which is thermal shutdown.
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November 25, 2013 12:26:23 PM

inzone said:
Yes those temps are fine and the reason they are ok is because you were doing a burn in test which will stress the CPU at 100%. This is the highest temps that you will ever see and there is nothing else that you can do outside of a full stress test that will cause the temps to match what you have in that screen shot.
BF4 might cause you to see low 70's maybe and your still over 25c away from TJmax which is thermal shutdown.


Ok i understand it. I have overclocked my system with Asus AI Suite 3, to 4.4GHz. And made prime95 test. It was ok when i was running my watercooling at max about 2000RPM.
here are my temps

As i read these two threads thread 1 and thread 2 I checked that those temps are not as good as should be. My voltages are too high, am i right? Or something else is wrong? Should i buy better thermalpaste.

And the second question, why is that in my task manager the core frequency is almost every time 800MHz.
In games like Hellgate London, it's still stacks at 800Mhz, and it causes me to crash a lot of times. Any suggestion how to fix this?
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