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BSOD after adding new hardware

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Last response: in Windows 7
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August 9, 2013 4:07:55 PM

Hi all,

I've just done a massive upgrade to my computer specs - new cpu, psu, graphics, and more ram - and after spending a few hours installing everything, I start the PC up, and after reaching the Windows loading page, it goes to the Blue Screen.

I've removed everything and tried to find the source of the problem - and I think I've isolated it to the Hard drive which I didn't change.

I'm not sure what the problem is, as the Hard drive was fine with the previous set up, however now it starts the BSOD and I'm quite confused.

Is there something which I'm doing wrong?

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks.

PS, previous system:
CPU: AMD Phenom II X2
Motherboard: Asus M4N68T
Memory: 4GB Corsair DDR3
Graphics: ATI Radeon HD 5770 1GB
and PSU 700W EZCool Tornado

and new system:
CPU: Intel i5 4670k
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z87-D3HP
Memory: 8GB Corsair
Graphics: Gigatebyte GTX 760 2GB
PSU: Corsair 600W

More about : bsod adding hardware

a b $ Windows 7
August 9, 2013 4:15:09 PM

You can't swap that much equipment without reinstalling Windows, or at least major headaches. Your choice now is how to salvage your data, if you want to. Swapping back to the old configuration may yield you a working machine for the purpose of saving anything important to you, if you don't have another computer you can do this with.

After any data recovery, install a fresh instance of Windows on the new hardware.
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August 9, 2013 11:55:35 PM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
You can't swap that much equipment without reinstalling Windows, or at least major headaches. Your choice now is how to salvage your data, if you want to. Swapping back to the old configuration may yield you a working machine for the purpose of saving anything important to you, if you don't have another computer you can do this with.

After any data recovery, install a fresh instance of Windows on the new hardware.


Can I ask how I would go about saving the data important to me? As I have alot installed on that harddrive.. would I lose everything with the clean install of windows?
And how would I go about doing the clean reinstall of windows?
Thanks for your help!

Update: would it be possible to put my old configurations back in, and then install the drivers which would be used in the new configuration?
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a b $ Windows 7
August 10, 2013 12:05:23 AM

Ideally, for a clean reinstallation, you wipe the drive during the installation process, meaning, there is nothing on it before installation.

To back up your data, you usually use a storage medium other than the primary hard drive installed in the computer you are backing up. This can be USB memory stick(s), an external hard drive, a secondary internal hard drive, cloud based storage, etc.

Copy what is important to you, pictures, music, data files, documents, downloaded applications, drivers (if you have them) to the other area that would not be touched if you chose to wipe clean the drive to which you're installing Windows.

If that is not possible, your best bet is to create a folder on your primary drive to hold your backup, and copy everything to that, and during installation, you have to be very careful that you leave the existing partition and format the same, and don't tinker with it when you reinstall.

After you reinstall Windows, you will need to reinstall your programs, so understand, any programs you do not have, you will have to reacquire somehow. If you have registered programs that need CD-Keys, make sure you either have those, or you will need to try and retrieve them from your current Windows installation before wiping it, or you may find yourself out of luck with those programs (this includes your copy of Windows.)

If you need special drivers to get onto the internet after you reinstall Windows, it's a darn good idea to have those, usually on a USB memory stick or external hard drive, before you reinstall Windows. You don't want to be in the position of needing to get online to retrieve your means of getting online. :-) That's the most important driver, usually, as no matter how ugly Windows may look, or how slow it performs before drivers get reinstalled, you can usually get everything you need online to get the rest of the system sorted.

Ideally, to access the data on your now, seemingly inaccessible hard drive, would be to take it from the non-booting computer system and install or attach it to a working computer system. If you don't have access to another system you can use for this purpose, then you would want to consider my suggestion of putting the old components back the way they were before you experienced the problems you're having now, just long enough to back up your data.

Once you have copies of your data, you can proceed to the reinstallation.
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