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Best custom water pump for an FX-8350?

Hey guys.

I just recently stably overclocked my 8350 to 4.6 Ghz at a voltage of ~1.39V. To overclock to the next ratio I would have to add a few more decimals of voltage than usual, and just that is creating substantially more heat. From 60°C to 65. To me that's a bit far from my safe zone. I would like to stay under 62°, but my Corsair H80 just isn't cutting it. I don't want to upgrade merely to an H100, so I'm gonna test the waters with a custom water loop. Money isn't too much of an issue, seeing as most pumps are around the same price range. If not, I can save up. I just want to know what the best pump for an 8350 would be. I've tried to do some researching and it turns out that a few pumps are subjective to the type of CPU is being used. For instance, one running best on an overclocked 2500k wouldn't run so great on a 4770k or 3990k. I don't even want to imagine the differences on an AMD.

If you guys had any first hand experience and tips, that would be awesome as well.

Specs:
Rosewill Thor V2
Topower 1000W
Sabertooth 990FX Rev2.0/Gen3
Gigabyte/PNY 660ti SLI
2x4 G.Skill Ripjaw X / 2x4 G.Skill Sniper

Thanks for yall's time.
12 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about custom water pump 8350
  1. Ellensar said:
    Hey guys.

    I just recently stably overclocked my 8350 to 4.6 Ghz at a voltage of ~1.39V. To overclock to the next ratio I would have to add a few more decimals of voltage than usual, and just that is creating substantially more heat. From 60°C to 65. To me that's a bit far from my safe zone. I would like to stay under 62°, but my Corsair H80 just isn't cutting it. I don't want to upgrade merely to an H100, so I'm gonna test the waters with a custom water loop. Money isn't too much of an issue, seeing as most pumps are around the same price range. If not, I can save up. I just want to know what the best pump for an 8350 would be. I've tried to do some researching and it turns out that a few pumps are subjective to the type of CPU is being used. For instance, one running best on an overclocked 2500k wouldn't run so great on a 4770k or 3990k. I don't even want to imagine the differences on an AMD.

    If you guys had any first hand experience and tips, that would be awesome as well.

    Specs:
    Rosewill Thor V2
    Topower 1000W
    Sabertooth 990FX Rev2.0/Gen3
    Gigabyte/PNY 660ti SLI
    2x4 G.Skill Ripjaw X / 2x4 G.Skill Sniper

    Thanks for yall's time.


    why would you pay so much for water cooling , if you can beat the AMD using i5 CPU and midrange Air Cooler in performance ? which will cost you less than costume water cooling ? just asking ?
  2. SNA3 said:
    Ellensar said:
    Hey guys.

    I just recently stably overclocked my 8350 to 4.6 Ghz at a voltage of ~1.39V. To overclock to the next ratio I would have to add a few more decimals of voltage than usual, and just that is creating substantially more heat. From 60°C to 65. To me that's a bit far from my safe zone. I would like to stay under 62°, but my Corsair H80 just isn't cutting it. I don't want to upgrade merely to an H100, so I'm gonna test the waters with a custom water loop. Money isn't too much of an issue, seeing as most pumps are around the same price range. If not, I can save up. I just want to know what the best pump for an 8350 would be. I've tried to do some researching and it turns out that a few pumps are subjective to the type of CPU is being used. For instance, one running best on an overclocked 2500k wouldn't run so great on a 4770k or 3990k. I don't even want to imagine the differences on an AMD.

    If you guys had any first hand experience and tips, that would be awesome as well.

    Specs:
    Rosewill Thor V2
    Topower 1000W
    Sabertooth 990FX Rev2.0/Gen3
    Gigabyte/PNY 660ti SLI
    2x4 G.Skill Ripjaw X / 2x4 G.Skill Sniper

    Thanks for yall's time.


    why would you pay so much for water cooling , if you can beat the AMD using i5 CPU and midrange Air Cooler in performance ? which will cost you less than costume water cooling ? just asking ?


    When I first built this rig, I was doing it because, "Hey, if I can build a computer when I was 10 (with the help of my dad) and have fun doing it, I sure as hell can do it 11 years later." And that's just what I did. Because of it, I'm going to minor in programming, and getting the best out of my computer has become my ultimate hobby. Seeing as my dad is a computer engineer for the FBI, I don't spend as much time with him as I used to.

    Sorry for the sob story. Don't know where that came form. tl;dr It's my hobby
  3. The CPU has no impact on what pump you should get, that would be the water-block and even then not really.

    Basically, you have two options when it comes to what pump too get. A Laing D5 or DDC variant.
    The D5 has higher flow rates, considered a good all rounder and is a common choice.
    A DDC has a higher head pressure, so if you have a particularly restrictive block/s then its a good option. Smaller than a D5, but does have heat issues as it isn't self cooling like a D5.
    IMO, your best off with a D5.

    Water-cooling companies offers their variants on those two designs, performance wise they are all roughly the same but will offer varying features.
  4. manofchalk said:
    The CPU has no impact on what pump you should get, that would be the water-block and even then not really.

    Basically, you have two options when it comes to what pump too get. A Laing D5 or DDC variant.
    The D5 has higher flow rates, considered a good all rounder and is a common choice.
    A DDC has a higher head pressure, so if you have a particularly restrictive block/s then its a good option. Smaller than a D5, but does have heat issues as it isn't self cooling like a D5.
    IMO, your best off with a D5.

    Water-cooling companies offers their variants on those two designs, performance wise they are all roughly the same but will offer varying features.


    Good info here!

    @OP Have you read the watercooling sticky?
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/277130-29-read-first-watercooling-sticky
  5. Thanks manofchalk and amuffin. I read through the watercooling sticky and am glad as hell I did. Though, I find it fascinating that you could also use pumps meant for aquariums, and I don't see why not. I learnt what a sticky was, too. :)

    After doing twice as much research on WCing than OCing, I've come to the conclusion of getting an XSPC kit, mainly due to the fact that the pump, block, and radiator are all some of the best in the charts. Also with the dual pump, it should help me cool my GTX 980 later in 2014. :p

    Everytime I came up with a question, a little more research would solve problem.

    But along the lines of later WCing my GPU, how would I fare with an Evga Hydro Copper as compared to a custom water block?
  6. Back in the olden days of hand-made water-cooling, aquarium pumps was all they had.

    Excessive pumping power actually doesn't help you beyond a point, it can actually have a negative effact as the extra pump would be dumping more heat into the loop than the faster flow rate over a single pump would cool down. If your sticking with a CPU block and single GPU, then you only need one pump. Even with multiple GPU's you can always parallel them to decrease flow restriction.
    However there is the idea of dual pumps for redundancy purposes, which makes sense.

    To my knowledge, the EVGA HydroCoppers are custom made Swiftech blocks. Performance wise you probably wont see a difference between them and having your own card and block. Probably cheaper to do it yourself though, and this way you also get an air heatsink you can strap back on if the loop were to ever fail for some reason.
  7. Best answer
    A variable speed D5 pump is my recommendation, it's a strong pump and allows you to test varying speeds and coolant flow strengths, so you can optimize your setup for the maximum cooling performance you can attain with your cooling hardware choices.

    Since you are considering stepping away from a CLC cooler like the H80, not only will a new pump be in the list but a new CPU water block as well I recommend the XSPC Raystorm, as it is an excellent performing water block.

    Quote:
    But along the lines of later WCing my GPU, how would I fare with an Evga Hydro Copper as compared to a custom water block?


    The hydro-copper costs more but is already factory overclocked and warrantied as such, so it will save you the time and effort of installing the GPU water block, and be overclock warranted out of the box.

    The only negative besides the price is Swiftechs new chrome plating of the inside of the water block itself, it's not a performance negative, but you can run into some reactions with certain coolant additives, so you would want to directly research that in the EVGA forums.

    So the next big question from you should be the radiator cooling area to dissipate the overclocking of your CPU so this recommendation will shock everyone here except manofchalk.

    Cooling performance wise this is one serious performing radiator, the MO-RA3 can be side mounted to your existing case it comes with the hardware for that mounting.

    Or it can be wall mounted, or with the accessory feet stand alone, it comes in various fan configuration setups, personally I prefer the 4 x 180mm as it is much quieter than 9 x 120mm.

    The highest cooling performing 180mm fans are these Silverstone 180mm x 32mm.

    My 2 cents! Ryan
  8. The MO-RA3 is a bloody beast of a radiator. I know for sure that I'm not gonna mount that on my side panel. I'd feel it would be near impossible to install, especially since I can't find any videos or guides of anyone doing so, let alone one in English. But I am definitely going to buy this and have it stand next to my tower. A problem I may have to overcome is if I ever transport this monster to my new pad in a few months. But what are friends for?

    Getting an MCP655 rather than an unneeded dual pump will give me the chance to get a Monsoon Series 2, which should add a bit of flash.

    The Raystorm was definitely on my list and have no question of it, along with those fans, seeing as they're uber quiet at higher rpm. Though, how would I go by hooking these up? Plugging them all together and using an extension to connect them to the PSU? I don't mind doing so, I just dislike the mess of cables.
  9. Damn, that is glorious.

    Before I sign out, I want to thank the both of you, manofchalk and 4Ryan6. I would be stuck at square 1 minus 1 if it weren't for you guys. In the past day and a half, I have learned more about watercooling than in all the days prior. As soon as I come back from my trip from Australia, this'll be the first thing on my to-do list. This is all much appreciated. Thank you.
  10. U R Welcome! I hope you have a safe and enjoyable trip down under! :)
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