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Z87 vs Z77

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August 10, 2013 3:16:33 PM

Not sure what the difference is between these two types of Mobos...will be using an i5-3570k and a nvidia gtx 670/680. Should i go with the Z87 or Z77 mobo?

More about : z87 z77

August 10, 2013 3:21:49 PM

u_gonna_squeal_b4_we_cookya said:
You can't use that CPU in a Z87 for one. They use different sockets. The Z77 uses an 1155 socket and the Z87 uses an 1150.


Ok so i should go with the Z77 then? Is it better to go with the 4th gen intel or 3rd gen?
August 10, 2013 3:31:10 PM

u_gonna_squeal_b4_we_cookya said:
Depends on what 4th gen. CPU you want to get. If you use the Z87 board and a Haswell CPU such as the i5 4670K then there is the possibility of upgrading it in the near future. If you use the Z77 and 3570k, then you cannot upgrade it. Both CPUs are 22nm and perform quite similarly. There really isn't much improvement over the 3570k other than the integrated GPU. Overall, looking at just the CPU power, the difference is only around 10%. It is better to go with the 4th gen, but not that much better. If you could find a 3rd gen. CPU on sale for quite a bit less, I'd go with that.

Great thank you for the help.
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October 18, 2013 6:30:42 PM

4th generation CPU can get more heated. I wanted to buy a haswell but then decided to go on with ivy bridge. Ivy bridge is in the brink of extinction right now but i am sure i can find few left in the market.

They have added the voltage regulator into the processor. thats something totally stupid to do. it will surely increase the heat of the processor and may be even cause some damage. The motherboard looks like a piece of empty board right now. I heard they are planning to take the FIVR (fully integrated voltage regulator) back to the mainboard on the next generation.

The only question i have is , where they kept the Voltage regulator on the older 3rd generation. Was it on the mainboard or on the north bridge?
October 18, 2013 6:31:44 PM

4th generation CPU can get more heated. I wanted to buy a haswell but then decided to go on with ivy bridge. Ivy bridge is in the brink of extinction right now but i am sure i can find few left in the market.

They have added the voltage regulator into the processor. thats something totally stupid to do. it will surely increase the heat of the processor and may be even cause some damage. The motherboard looks like a piece of empty board right now. I heard they are planning to take the FIVR (fully integrated voltage regulator) back to the mainboard on the next generation.

The only question i have is , where they kept the Voltage regulator on the older 3rd generation. Was it on the mainboard or on the north bridge?
October 18, 2013 10:35:22 PM

ahmedshihab said:
4th generation CPU can get more heated. I wanted to buy a haswell but then decided to go on with ivy bridge. Ivy bridge is in the brink of extinction right now but i am sure i can find few left in the market.

They have added the voltage regulator into the processor. thats something totally stupid to do. it will surely increase the heat of the processor and may be even cause some damage. The motherboard looks like a piece of empty board right now. I heard they are planning to take the FIVR (fully integrated voltage regulator) back to the mainboard on the next generation.

The only question i have is , where they kept the Voltage regulator on the older 3rd generation. Was it on the mainboard or on the north bridge?


The voltage regulator is a part of the motherboard on Ivy Bridge. Also, Haswell, Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge (2nd gen) all have the northbridge on the CPU die. And I am assuming all future CPUs will as well. AMD started doing the same at around the same time. Putting the VR on the die with Haswell was just another step closer to a SoC for Intel's desktop CPU lineup. Soon there will be no separate CPU and motherboard. I believe, and there are rumors saying, that within the next decade, CPUs will ship similarly to how GPUs ship today: embedded on a PCB that contains voltage regulation components, DIMM slots, PCIe slots, USB ports and SATA ports. There will be no socket or removable CPU anymore.
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