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Changing motherboard, use my current OEM?

Last response: in Windows 7
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August 11, 2013 10:36:20 AM

Hi guys,

About 2 years ago i bought myself a custom built PC and am now looking to upgrade several parts. I am purchasing a new motherboard so i will lose Windows. I have the Windows OEM pack that was used to first install it onto the PC, will i be able to still use this OEM to install onto my new motherboard & Cpu etc as people say it can be used several times as long as its onto the same PC. However as its a different motherboard will it not count as the same PC?

Otherwise i will have to purchase a new OEM of Windows 7.

Thanks,
a c 82 V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
August 11, 2013 10:44:20 AM

depends on how significant an upgrade you are doing, you can try it, although you may need to contact microsoft support if it doesn't let you. Just explain your situation and they may re-initiate your product key, but I wouldn't hold my breath. It's worth a shot.
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a b V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
August 11, 2013 10:49:02 AM

Simon Bull said:
Hi guys,

About 2 years ago i bought myself a custom built PC and am now looking to upgrade several parts. I am purchasing a new motherboard so i will lose Windows. I have the Windows OEM pack that was used to first install it onto the PC, will i be able to still use this OEM to install onto my new motherboard & Cpu etc as people say it can be used several times as long as its onto the same PC. However as its a different motherboard will it not count as the same PC?

Otherwise i will have to purchase a new OEM of Windows 7.

Thanks,


The "new" pc part specifically targets the motherboard. You cannot use it again, you will have to buy a version, or pay for a new license activation number from Microsoft. That is why the OEM verison is cheap, you can only every install it on 1 system. You can get a new activation number from Microsoft under certain conditions. They will go along with it if you can prove to them that your old motherboard went bad, and you had to replace it with an alike or at least very similar board.
However, upgrading the motherboard essentially means you are building a new platform for a new system. If you think you may be upgrading again and may need to install Win 7 again, you should buy a retail version. You can install it as many times on as many systems as you like, 1 at a time of course.
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a b V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
August 11, 2013 11:09:31 AM

^Not always.

Also, I never recommend buying the retail version of windows - 99% of the time you just call microsoft and say that you have a homebuilt computer and are requesting to activate it again, and they let you do it just fine. I've never even had to prove that the old motherboard went bad, and in many cases, it didn't, it was just a routine upgrade.
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a b V Motherboard
a b $ Windows 7
August 11, 2013 11:26:39 AM

DarkSable said:
^Not always.

Also, I never recommend buying the retail version of windows - 99% of the time you just call microsoft and say that you have a homebuilt computer and are requesting to activate it again, and they let you do it just fine. I've never even had to prove that the old motherboard went bad, and in many cases, it didn't, it was just a routine upgrade.


If you can bend your way around a little and get a new activation for a new platform you are building for an OEM license string, and you can feel good about it, then go for it.
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