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Memory issues after installing Samsung SSD

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August 12, 2013 9:51:40 AM

I just installed a new SSD, SAMSUNG 830 Series 2.5-Inch 128GB SATA III. I reinstalled Win 8 64-bit on the new drive. Nothing else changed with my system. Since the install, I'm having memory issues that I was not having previously. I can have Firefox up, and 1 or 2 instances of a game that I play, and start getting messages that I'm almost out of memory. I've been running the same setup (without the SSD) for about 5 months with no issues like this, running many more programs.

Does anyone have information on what may be causing this and why, and if there is a solution to it (other than more memory).

OS: Win 8 64-bit
MB: ASUS P8Z77-V LE PLUS LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz
GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 660 2GB 192-bit GDDR5 Memory: Corsair XMS3 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1600 MHz
a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 10:07:52 AM

Here are some questions / things for you to try:

- Did you do a clean install (reformat) of Windows 8 or did you clone it from a previous installation?

- Flash your BIOS to latest update if it's not already done. You could also reset BIOS to default settings.

- Check the Samsung website for possible firmware updates for your drive.

- Make sure you're using up-to-date drivers, especially for chipset and disk controller.

- In your BIOS, make sure SATA mode is set to AHCI, it will give you much better performance for SSD. Note that it might give you a BSOD on reboot if you have to change that, so here's a procedure to install the AHCI drivers without having to reinstall Windows (it's for Windows 7 but this should also apply to Windows 8):

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976

- One last question, since you get out of memory messages, are you sure Windows 8 detected your memory correctly since reinstalling? When you right-click on Computer and select Properties, how much memory available does it shows? Did you also check the Task Manager for the amount of memory in use?

Finally, I don't know if it's a new drive you just bought, but this is an old model. If it's not too late you could return it and exchange it for a Samsung 840 or the new Samsung 840 Evo.
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a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 10:46:45 AM

An Out of Memoy error is probably NOT related to the SSD andcertinly no need to swap it for the Samsung 840 (Non-Pro). And as far as the 840 Pro you would not see much, if any, performance increase (OUtside of syntethic Benchmarks).

Most likely this is a result of your re-install of Windows 8.
As MC_K7 indicated you can check it in task Manager.
Verify that all of your ram is visable.
Also check your Pagefile (Virtual Memory).
Myself, I have 8 gigs of ram in two system and Have set the Min and Max for page file to the same value - 1024 mbs which is MUCH lower than windows normally will set it to. One system is a laptop (Win 8) the other a desktop (Win 7) and I have NEVER recieved an out of memory error.

I have 3 Samsung 830's and 2 Samsung 840 Pros Plus a bunch of other SSDs.
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a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 11:02:06 AM

I didn't say the Samsung 830 is a bad drive or anything. But if you have to buy a new one today, why go with a drive that is 2 years old when you can get the new 840 "Evo" for roughly the same price? Anyways, as you said I'd be surprised his out of memory problems are caused by the SSD.
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August 12, 2013 11:29:40 AM

MC_K7 said:
Here are some questions / things for you to try:

- Did you do a clean install (reformat) of Windows 8 or did you clone it from a previous installation?

- Flash your BIOS to latest update if it's not already done. You could also reset BIOS to default settings.

- Check the Samsung website for possible firmware updates for your drive.

- Make sure you're using up-to-date drivers, especially for chipset and disk controller.

- In your BIOS, make sure SATA mode is set to AHCI, it will give you much better performance for SSD. Note that it might give you a BSOD on reboot if you have to change that, so here's a procedure to install the AHCI drivers without having to reinstall Windows (it's for Windows 7 but this should also apply to Windows 8):

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976

- One last question, since you get out of memory messages, are you sure Windows 8 detected your memory correctly since reinstalling? When you right-click on Computer and select Properties, how much memory available does it shows? Did you also check the Task Manager for the amount of memory in use?

Finally, I don't know if it's a new drive you just bought, but this is an old model. If it's not too late you could return it and exchange it for a Samsung 840 or the new Samsung 840 Evo.


RetiredChief said:
An Out of Memoy error is probably NOT related to the SSD andcertinly no need to swap it for the Samsung 840 (Non-Pro). And as far as the 840 Pro you would not see much, if any, performance increase (OUtside of syntethic Benchmarks).

Most likely this is a result of your re-install of Windows 8.
As MC_K7 indicated you can check it in task Manager.
Verify that all of your ram is visable.
Also check your Pagefile (Virtual Memory).
Myself, I have 8 gigs of ram in two system and Have set the Min and Max for page file to the same value - 1024 mbs which is MUCH lower than windows normally will set it to. One system is a laptop (Win 8) the other a desktop (Win 7) and I have NEVER recieved an out of memory error.

I have 3 Samsung 830's and 2 Samsung 840 Pros Plus a bunch of other SSDs.


*I did a clean install of Win 8 on the new SSD; cloning to SSD from HDD is typically not advised.

*I have not flashed BIOS, but will try that. I did however, reset it to default a couple of days ago and am still receiving the error.

*I updated firmware on the SSD on install.

*I have updated all drivers except disk controller (not exactly sure how to do that one, I'll figure out how to and update as well).

*I ensured SATA mode was set to AHCI in BIOS on install of SSD.

*I have verified that Windows recognized the memory properly, that was one of the first things I did when receiving the error.

*I chose this model of SSD after researching for reliability, most reviews indicated the 830 is more reliable and has a better track record than the 840.

I was switching from a HDD that was failing, I had some pages pulled up that gave information on optimizing for a SSD and of course lost them when system crashed and it wasn't saving any data. I'll have to find them and review again to see if I caught everything for optimization.

Retired, I'll check the Pagefile, to see where it is currently.

Thank you both for your recommendations, I make some updates and check back in later with the results!
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a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 11:40:26 AM

Then I really don't know where your out of memory problems come from.

Disk controller driver usually come with the same package that installs drivers for all your chipset. So if you installed latest chipset drivers, you most probably have latest disk controller drivers too.

At first I thought it could be some weird hardware problem. Anyways it's always a good idea to have latest BIOS version so I would definitely do it.

But now I'm starting to think it could be a software problem. When this happens, did you monitor Task Manager and try to see if a process in particular was eating all the RAM? You can also download better versions of Task Manager programs on the web that might give you more details. It could be totally real that you're really running out of memory even if you have a large quantity of RAM installed, all it takes is one faulty program that gets caught in an endless loop and start eating all the memory until there's nothing left.

On a side note, I would avoid following too much websites with SSD optimization methods, some of their recommended tricks can do more harm than good. Windows 7 and Windows 8 usually detect SSD perfectly and optimize them accordingly (for instance, activate TRIM automatically, etc...) so there's not much tweaking left to be done after.
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a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 12:32:34 PM

Here are the only SSD tweeks I always do
1) Disable Hibernation. Use to cause problems - no somuch any more, but Find No real need for it and it saves amount of space approx equal to ram.
2) Manage page file - With 8 or more gigs of ram I always set both the min and Max to 1024 mbs (Saves abut 11 gigs w/8 gig ram). This keeps it from dynamically varing the size. And who needs 12 gig page file. With it set to only one gig I keep on ssd.
3) I disable restore points. I rely on Backup image that windows 7 & 8 create using BU system image. However limiting its size is OK as each restore point requires 300 mbs - just 20 restore points = 6 Gigs space.

O, and I move "my Doc" off of the C drive (HDD or SSD) as I like My files and data seperate from the OS + Programs.
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a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 1:39:55 PM

Yes I forgot about the hibernation tweak, I did it a few times. Although hibernation is almost always turned off by default on most Windows, for some reasons the system still reserves space equivalent to your amount of RAM for hibernation even if it's turned off. There's a command line that kills the hibernation file and free up the space.

There was a Tom's Hardware article recently that destroyed pretty much all other known tweaks, they tested several different SSD models, all of the popular tweaks you can find around the web, and they benchmarked the results and compared results before and after, and there was no difference in performance whatsoever. Some tweaks even had negative impact on performance. They also said that people fearing too many writes to a SSD it was also a myth. SSDs are good for hundred thousands of hours at least. So you'll probably replace it with new technology or better SSDs before its end of life anyways. Or even with very intense write, they said that you could write 50GB of data to a SSD everyday for 10 years. But nobody is likely to do that, and even so, the drive would still last for 10 years at least.

I don't like messing around with the page file, some specialized or non-standard software might not like that so it might make the system less stable, so I recommend leaving the page file managed by the system. Also, I prefer to keep my restore points they might come in handy, and I don't mind if it causes more writes to my SSD.

But yeah, if you use a secondary HDD, I also change the target for default system folders like My Documents, Desktop, Music, Videos, Images, etc... And make them point directly to the HDD.
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a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 1:52:28 PM

1) The tweaks I do, I do not do for performance nor to decrease the writes.
I do as they provide little benefit (at least for me) and I hate wasting the space. - LOL.
On page file, where people get into trouble is that they set it to Zero, Which would be OK, EXCEPT as you noted there are some programs that balk if they find no page file even if they DON'T need it. Reason I set it to a small value - and I do this even for a HDD system with no SSD.

On restore points, No problem with NOT disabling it, But do recommend that the size of the Folder be managed. I think windows sets upto 10% of the drive for this folder. Probably a good size would be to limit it to say 1.5 Gigs which would allow for the latest 5 Restore points to be saved.

The old saying comes to mine " A penny saved is a penny earned" Just change penny to gigabyte.
It's bad enough that they now recommend you leave at least 20 % unused.
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a b } Memory
August 12, 2013 3:02:39 PM

RetiredChief said:
The old saying comes to mine " A penny saved is a penny earned" Just change penny to gigabyte. It's bad enough that they now recommend you leave at least 20 % unused.


LOL, yeah that's true. I'm even more paranoid and go for 30% unused.
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August 14, 2013 10:32:06 AM

So after making the suggested changes, I have been monitoring my system with multiple programs open, and so far have not received any messages about being out of memory. Not sure what exactly fixed it, but something did! Again, thank you both for your assistance with this weird issue.

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February 8, 2014 7:57:48 AM

Can someone like me to this test of tweaks?

MC_K7 said:
Yes I forgot about the hibernation tweak, I did it a few times. Although hibernation is almost always turned off by default on most Windows, for some reasons the system still reserves space equivalent to your amount of RAM for hibernation even if it's turned off. There's a command line that kills the hibernation file and free up the space.

There was a Tom's Hardware article recently that destroyed pretty much all other known tweaks, they tested several different SSD models, all of the popular tweaks you can find around the web, and they benchmarked the results and compared results before and after, and there was no difference in performance whatsoever. Some tweaks even had negative impact on performance. They also said that people fearing too many writes to a SSD it was also a myth. SSDs are good for hundred thousands of hours at least. So you'll probably replace it with new technology or better SSDs before its end of life anyways. Or even with very intense write, they said that you could write 50GB of data to a SSD everyday for 10 years. But nobody is likely to do that, and even so, the drive would still last for 10 years at least.

I don't like messing around with the page file, some specialized or non-standard software might not like that so it might make the system less stable, so I recommend leaving the page file managed by the system. Also, I prefer to keep my restore points they might come in handy, and I don't mind if it causes more writes to my SSD.

But yeah, if you use a secondary HDD, I also change the target for default system folders like My Documents, Desktop, Music, Videos, Images, etc... And make them point directly to the HDD.


Can someone like me to this test of tweaks?


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!