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How to change dedicated memory on Graphics Card

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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August 13, 2013 9:21:45 PM

I just recently built my first PC. Everything ran well for the first few weeks then the games started to become extremely glitchy. Support from the website told me the dedicated memory of my graphics card (EVGA GTX 770 Classified) was 64mb, which the game required 250+mb...

I thought the card had 4GB of memory... ?!

Will someone please help me. Sorry if something is obviously wrong here, again this is my first computer build and am now dealing with PC's after having used mac for over 6 years...so i'm fairly new to all this.
August 13, 2013 9:45:38 PM

The support website is completely wrong. You do indeed have 4GB of dedicated graphics memory. There seems to be some kind of huge misconception here; How did they determine you had this problem?


edit:: I forgot to answer your title question. The answer is you don't/can't change dedicated memory on your GPU. It's an absurd question.

The only way I can think of now having 64mb of graphics memory is if you somehow switched back to your CPU/integrated graphics, and are not using the GPU at all. Did you disconnect/change the cable? I'm assuming not.. and I'm also assuming your GPU is working or else you would likely not be able to get any output on it. It's possible that it's in the process of failing but that's far from the best guess right now.
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August 13, 2013 10:15:39 PM

rylt said:
The support website is completely wrong. You do indeed have 4GB of dedicated graphics memory. There seems to be some kind of huge misconception here; How did they determine you had this problem?


edit:: I forgot to answer your title question. The answer is you don't/can't change dedicated memory on your GPU. It's an absurd question.

The only way I can think of now having 64mb of graphics memory is if you somehow switched back to your CPU/integrated graphics, and are not using the GPU at all. Did you disconnect/change the cable? I'm assuming not.. and I'm also assuming your GPU is working or else you would likely not be able to get any output on it. It's possible that it's in the process of failing but that's far from the best guess right now.


Yeahhhh I am pretty confused myself. I am pretty sure i've read that my motherboard does have some built in Graphics something another... (Gigabyte Z87X-UD5H) hows could I find this? in the BIOS? Ive never really done any work in there before.. ( I had a buddy help me build and set up the compute ) but I've been doing a lot of my own research trying to learn about all this.

I sent them a text file of a DXdiag ? what is that?
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August 13, 2013 10:42:12 PM

Built in graphics are on the CPU, but come out through the motherboard. The difference is that you can buy some processors that have it enabled and some that don't. If you are using the on-board graphics, the cord connecting to your screen would connect to your computer at the motherboard. Otherwise, the cord goes to your graphics card, and you are using your GTX 770. That's all there is to it.


Bios comes into play when your computer starts up but can't figure out what signal is correct.. the usual problem would be you turn your pc on but the screen stays black. not really related to this issue, unless you have both cords plugged in & it's choosing the wrong one automatically.. but that would be a strange set up.

a quick way to see if anything is up hardware wise is to re-run your windows performance index & look for obviously low scores. DXdiag is the best way to tell, but I don't know how to read them. Dxdiag is the best tool you have for these kinds of problems. If it ends up being a hardware problem, you'll probably want to end up sending one of those files to the EVGA guys.
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Best solution

a b U Graphics card
August 13, 2013 10:48:25 PM

There is a DVI connector on your motherboard and two on your video card.

Double check to make sure your monitor is plugged into your video card.
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August 13, 2013 10:55:32 PM

I don't really see any easy solutions, but If I were you I would start with that. My thoughts so far are:

1) Checking the cable & making sure your Graphics card is what's being used.
2) Checking windows performance index (it's a lightweight kind of benchmark) to see if performance is as expected.
3) going to the nvidia website and checking that my drivers are up-to-date

if it's not any of these, then the next step would be to post your system specs.. but I'm hesitant to ask because it doesn't seem like you're quite used to all this; so here's another thought. The only time I have had a working GPU do something like that is if it was

a) over heating. you can try installing speedfan and seeing what it tells you about your computer temperatures.
b) failing due to power supply problems. posting your computer specs may help solve that one
c) failing due to hardware failure, which would mean going to the EVGA website & starting a chat with support there.

I wish I had more answers but it's a pretty vague question at this point. The best way to the right track is probably reading up. If it were me I would look for similar threads & find people who had posted similar problems. Then you could re-post with a better question or perhaps find a quick answer ;.
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