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Power Supply Short Circuit

Last response: in Components
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August 15, 2013 11:04:51 AM

Idk if this is the right section... but anyway.

I bought a Corsair TX650 PSU and received it yesterday. I set it up, and turned on my pc, and it wasn'tworking. I'm new to PC building so I figure that was the issue. But when I tried to take it out the sata cable got stuck in my dvd drive and the head of it got ripped off. I figured if I put electrical tape it wouldn't effect it. But now I am thinking it may have short circuited it. I tried to run it with the paper clip method, and it will turn on for 5 seconds then shut off. I don't know what to do and it'd suck if I broke it. Please help!

@Oczdude8, I didn't individually connect them at first. Someone on a different forum told me I needed to so I tried that. I am saying, maybe I short circuited it when I didn't do it individually?
a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 11:10:43 AM

if you use electrical tape, make sure to wrap each one of the 5 wires separately and it should work (Im assuming the head was completely ripped off and you have exposed wires). Its not that easy to short circuit a psu and burn it, they have protection against it, especially a corsair one.

check this out :http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/pc_builders_b...
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a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 11:11:54 AM

You should not use the damaged SATA connector, remove it from the system and try to be firm but gentle with cables. Inspect the optical drive connector to insure that it too was not damaged, then use a different SATA connector to connect the optical drive. That entire SATA power cable would be compromised unless you properly reconnect the incoming and outgoing wires to power the other connectors on that string.
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August 15, 2013 11:16:28 AM

RealBeast said:
You should not use the damaged SATA connector, remove it from the system and try to be firm but gentle with cables. Inspect the optical drive connector to insure that it too was not damaged, then use a different SATA connector to connect the optical drive. That entire SATA power cable would be compromised unless you properly reconnect the incoming and outgoing wires to power the other connectors on that string.


I didn't use it again, it just messed up the whole PSU it seems.
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August 15, 2013 11:16:44 AM

oczdude8 said:
if you use electrical tape, make sure to wrap each one of the 5 wires separately and it should work (Im assuming the head was completely ripped off and you have exposed wires). Its not that easy to short circuit a psu and burn it, they have protection against it, especially a corsair one.

check this out :http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/pc_builders_b...


@Oczdude8, I didn't individually connect them at first. Someone on a different forum told me I needed to so I tried that. I am saying, maybe I short circuited it when I didn't do it individually?
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a c 80 ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 11:20:31 AM

If you tied all the wires together, You could have shorted the power supply for sure.

Lucky for you, power supplies shut off or fold over when they get shorted.

Removing the tape and re-wrapping all the wires one at a time(you can tape them all together again after once they are covered.) should allow the power supply to work again. If not, you may have other issues.
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a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 11:22:55 AM

Wowzoor said:
oczdude8 said:
if you use electrical tape, make sure to wrap each one of the 5 wires separately and it should work (Im assuming the head was completely ripped off and you have exposed wires). Its not that easy to short circuit a psu and burn it, they have protection against it, especially a corsair one.

check this out :http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/pc_builders_b...


@Oczdude8, I didn't individually connect them at first. Someone on a different forum told me I needed to so I tried that. I am saying, maybe I short circuited it when I didn't do it individually?


of course you will short circuit it, you connected the 12v line to ground. Your psu may be damaged. Have you corrected this issue? have you individually wrapped each cable with tape so there is no possibility of contact? try unplugging every cable from your motherboard and other peripherial and only connect psu to like a hard drive or fan and do the paperclip method to see if he psu powers on.
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August 15, 2013 11:23:02 AM

nukemaster said:
If you tied all the wires together, You could have shorted the power supply for sure.

Lucky for you, power supplies shut off or fold over when they get shorted.

Removing the tape and re-wrapping all the wires one at a time(you can tape them all together again after once they are covered.) should allow the power supply to work again. If not, you may have other issues.


The electrical tape I put on? I did do that, separated all the wires and didn't do anything.
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a c 80 ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 11:26:46 AM

I would paperclip the power supply again with only a few fans and maybe a hard drive connected to it.

Some power supplies may not want to start without any load(or start and become unstable then shut down).
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August 15, 2013 11:27:42 AM

oczdude8 said:
Wowzoor said:
oczdude8 said:
if you use electrical tape, make sure to wrap each one of the 5 wires separately and it should work (Im assuming the head was completely ripped off and you have exposed wires). Its not that easy to short circuit a psu and burn it, they have protection against it, especially a corsair one.

check this out :http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/pc_builders_b...


@Oczdude8, I didn't individually connect them at first. Someone on a different forum told me I needed to so I tried that. I am saying, maybe I short circuited it when I didn't do it individually?


of course you will short circuit it, you connected the 12v line to ground. Your psu may be damaged. Have you corrected this issue? have you individually wrapped each cable with tape so there is no possibility of contact? try unplugging every cable from your motherboard and other peripherial and only connect psu to like a hard drive or fan and do the paperclip method to see if he psu powers on.


I individually taped them all and there is still the issue. I don't have a spare hard drive or fan so I really can't. :/ 

I could try and connect it to my GPU I have, if it won't break it.
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a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 11:34:46 AM

your system has no hard drives or fans in it? it doesn't have to be something "spare". just unplug everything except for a hard drive.
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August 15, 2013 11:36:24 AM

oczdude8 said:
your system has no hard drives or fans in it? it doesn't have to be something "spare". just unplug everything except for a hard drive.


I couldn't be responding to you then.
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a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 11:38:56 AM

Some PSUs cannot stay on without a minimum amount of loading on some of their rails. You would need a multimeter and check voltages on each rail before the PSU shuts down to determine whether or not any rail might be dead. With no loads attached, it is possible that one of the rails creeps up due to stray/leakage inductance and eventually trips over-voltage protections.

You could also see if adding a bit of load with fans and expendable old HDDs will take the PSU out of its possibly problematic no-load zone.

Shorting to ground should be fine since any remotely well designed PSU will at the very least have primary-side over-current protection that should prevent any damage to output components. If you shorted across supply rails (say +12V to +3.3V) then whether or not you might have messed something up depends on how those rails were built. I doubt the 3.3V rail contains components that would instantaneously fail after a short trip to 12V (assuming the PSU even gets a chance to ramp voltage that high before over-voltage protections start shorting rails to ground to protect their loads) but it isn't impossible.

Long story short: good PSUs are rugged devices. You shouldn't be able to kill them with a simple short.
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August 15, 2013 11:43:42 AM

Would I be able to connect my GPU to test it? Or is it too risky?

I just went for it and now it's working fine. 650w power supply and gtx 650 ti. Thx :D 
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a b ) Power supply
August 15, 2013 1:28:52 PM

Wowzoor said:
Would I be able to connect my GPU to test it? Or is it too risky?

Personally, when I accidentally short a PSU in my PCs, I simply make sure I fix the cause of the short, plug everything back in and boot it back up. The last time this happened to me was a loose molex connector bumping into a screw. I re-tied spare connectors away from the screw and turned the PC back on.

I would not recommend plugging the 12V AUX connector alone since the GPU may need power from the PCIe slot for proper power sequencing during boot. Your motherboard should have the second beefiest (and likely only other) all-rails over-voltage protection in your system after the PSU's own and that would make it the safest option after simulated loads.

Personally, I would not lose sleep about shorting a PSU unless it was a known-flaky unit. If any of your components got damaged, it would likely be from the short itself: some components react poorly to supply voltage dropping below output voltages when shorts occur on the input side - linear regulators in particular are notoriously vulnerable to that.
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