Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

New build need advice on the parts!

Last response: in Systems
Share
August 15, 2013 7:01:31 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: This weekend

Budget Range: (1000-1200) Before Rebates; After Shipping

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Really only gaming.

Are you buying a monitor: Yes


Parts to Upgrade: (e.g.: CPU, mobo, RAM) **Include Power Supply Make & Model If Re-using**

Do you need to buy OS: Yes
Please note that if you're using an OEM license of Windows, you will need a new one when buying a new motherboard.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg usually but i am open.

Location: Rockford, MN United States

Parts Preferences: by brand or type Intel based

Overclocking: No

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe in the future

Your Monitor Resolution: Preferably 1920x1080, or 1920x1200

Additional Comments: Good for upgrading in the future and lasts a while.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: Only have a laptop at the moment.


My current plan of attack: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/UberNoobs/saved/2biA

I currently have a keyboard and mouse as well as I have already purchased the case and hard drive on there so do not worry about those thank you :)  I would like any advice and opinions anyone has thank you!

More about : build advice parts

August 15, 2013 7:11:59 PM

Ur rig seems have quite a lot of fat:

1. since ur CPU couldn't OC, just buy a 130-ish mobo if u wanna do SLI in the futur

2. 250GB HDD is quite scarce today, for 10 more dollars ucould get a 1TB HDD to store games

3. It's strange that u spend 120 bucks on just a fancy case but 30 on a not-so-good PSU, and wanna do SLI in the futur ?!

How about this?

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ssqh
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ssqh/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ssqh/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($294.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($77.37 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VS238H-P 23.0" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1157.27
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-15 22:08 EDT-0400)
m
0
l
August 15, 2013 8:29:58 PM

Maxime506 said:
Ur rig seems have quite a lot of fat:

1. since ur CPU couldn't OC, just buy a 130-ish mobo if u wanna do SLI in the futur

2. 250GB HDD is quite scarce today, for 10 more dollars ucould get a 1TB HDD to store games

3. It's strange that u spend 120 bucks on just a fancy case but 30 on a not-so-good PSU, and wanna do SLI in the futur ?!

How about this?

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ssqh
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ssqh/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1ssqh/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($294.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($77.37 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card ($249.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VS238H-P 23.0" Monitor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1157.27
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-15 22:08 EDT-0400)


Thank you for your input brought up some valid points i will definitely consider what you have put!:)  anyone else?
m
0
l
Related resources

Best solution

August 15, 2013 8:48:23 PM

Like ALMOST ALL noobs you're depending on the knowledge of others to skate through the tough spots. LEARN by reading, doing your OWN research... that means each component part starting with the PSU. You can fry $1200 in parts by overworking a $30 unit.... You MAY also learn the most expensive CPU isn't really the right one for you... same with the board, etc. Ok, so you're in a hurry... can't fault you for that. At one time or another almost all of us were in that situation but we learned through sometimes expensive mistakes. So.. take the advice given here.... then start reading so you can decide for your self... later you may start answering advice queries. Educate yourself first. Learn where to spend to get the biggest bang for your buck... always with an eye on upgrades... price/performance ratio... starting with the PSU. Get a certified unit that is properly sized for your needs now with an eye to the future. It'll last longer and lower your contribution to the power companies already fat wallets. (I didn't read your build specifics). If you don't need 1200W, don't buy it. The reviewers use them as a means of eliminating any possibility of skewing the results... that, and they're provided for free.. unless you anticipate a triple/quad SLI/Crossfire rig in the near future, which you can't do on 1,200.... and ALWAYS buy quality.

The mere fact that you are interested in building your own rig illustrates that you are already aware that most off-the shelf units (big box stores) aren't what you want. I can also understand that you don't want to pay for a niche market build that can go WAY over the top on price. So, start reading. NOW.

There are times most of us here (I am by NO MEANS in the same league as the top responders, but, I am aware that many of them may not answer because it's the same-old-same-old) wish that new posters would have to read something like this before posting. I mean, who really READS a EULA agreement? The more you educate yourself the happier you will be in the long run... and the less likely you will be to whack yourself in the forehead with an "OH, DAMN!! I wish I'd known that sooner." And that's basically what a lot of these guys are trying to teach others like you. I am not coming down on your case. We were all there at some point. I "got in" when memory was DDR(1) transitioning to DDR2, dual cores were the new wave, and if you had money to blow there were a few quads around. IDE was predominant while SATA 1.5 was the new thing... some had SATAII and there was this thing called a Floppy. AGP was still going strong and PCIex16 was just about cutting edge. BluRay? what's that? How about RDRAM... USB(1) was new... getting the picture? Yes, it IS a new day today... and a lot less demanding in the way of... making that decision on a graphics card. SSD's were barely around and, if you'll check out the history.. no one was really sure if they'd work or not or how long they'd last. Count your blessings.. educate.

I hope this help PAST this build and into your future.
Share
August 15, 2013 9:32:37 PM

A VERY good read for you. [new build] $7000 rig I need some advice about parts It's on here a few lines below - or go find it. I sometimes read new builds for entertainment... not for giving advice. I find this one particularly hilarious and sad because he demeans the advisors who are only attempting to help and educate him. Says he wants their help but he resists almost every ounce of help they offer.... like rubbing their noses in the dirt because he has money and claims he is smarter than they. Dude can't even spell. He pissed almost everyone off, to boot.

Suggestion.. go to maximumpc.com and check out their builds - they do them frequently. Love their sense of humour and advice. I think I even learned something from it... RAM speed/latency = true speed, if correct, will tell you something. Thanks for listening.
m
0
l
August 15, 2013 9:46:53 PM

Lestr50 said:
Like ALMOST ALL noobs you're depending on the knowledge of others to skate through the tough spots. LEARN by reading, doing your OWN research... that means each component part starting with the PSU. You can fry $1200 in parts by overworking a $30 unit.... You MAY also learn the most expensive CPU isn't really the right one for you... same with the board, etc. Ok, so you're in a hurry... can't fault you for that. At one time or another almost all of us were in that situation but we learned through sometimes expensive mistakes. So.. take the advice given here.... then start reading so you can decide for your self... later you may start answering advice queries. Educate yourself first. Learn where to spend to get the biggest bang for your buck... always with an eye on upgrades... price/performance ratio... starting with the PSU. Get a certified unit that is properly sized for your needs now with an eye to the future. It'll last longer and lower your contribution to the power companies already fat wallets. (I didn't read your build specifics). If you don't need 1200W, don't buy it. The reviewers use them as a means of eliminating any possibility of skewing the results... that, and they're provided for free.. unless you anticipate a triple/quad SLI/Crossfire rig in the near future, which you can't do on 1,200.... and ALWAYS buy quality.

The mere fact that you are interested in building your own rig illustrates that you are already aware that most off-the shelf units (big box stores) aren't what you want. I can also understand that you don't want to pay for a niche market build that can go WAY over the top on price. So, start reading. NOW.

There are times most of us here (I am by NO MEANS in the same league as the top responders, but, I am aware that many of them may not answer because it's the same-old-same-old) wish that new posters would have to read something like this before posting. I mean, who really READS a EULA agreement? The more you educate yourself the happier you will be in the long run... and the less likely you will be to whack yourself in the forehead with an "OH, DAMN!! I wish I'd known that sooner." And that's basically what a lot of these guys are trying to teach others like you. I am not coming down on your case. We were all there at some point. I "got in" when memory was DDR(1) transitioning to DDR2, dual cores were the new wave, and if you had money to blow there were a few quads around. IDE was predominant while SATA 1.5 was the new thing... some had SATAII and there was this thing called a Floppy. AGP was still going strong and PCIex16 was just about cutting edge. BluRay? what's that? How about RDRAM... USB(1) was new... getting the picture? Yes, it IS a new day today... and a lot less demanding in the way of... making that decision on a graphics card. SSD's were barely around and, if you'll check out the history.. no one was really sure if they'd work or not or how long they'd last. Count your blessings.. educate.

I hope this help PAST this build and into your future.


Thank you for giving your time to reply to my post, i will definitely keep reading and learning and be putting final touches as i see them to be improved and i really thank you for your input, i believe i can take it from here :)  but if anyone still wants to reply go for it !
m
0
l
!