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is this good for bf4 or planetside2 on high or ultra

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August 16, 2013 1:17:55 PM

i would want to play on high or ultra

dont want to spend more that 1400 but will go up to 1500 USD

updated here are new choices i will be playing on my 40inch hdtv until i find a good monitor

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
(choice a)
CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($71.35 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($90.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ NCIX US) x
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($259.99 @ Newegg) x
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($259.99 @ Newegg) x
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg) x
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg) x
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ Outlet PC) x
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC) x
Total: $1398.23
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-15 13:06 EDT-0400)



choice b
CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($71.35 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($333.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($333.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 500R Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1451.21
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-15 12:08 EDT-0400
August 16, 2013 1:25:07 PM

the second one is much better

760 sli blows it up










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August 16, 2013 1:25:20 PM

It will for sure, but this will probably do better: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/kirilmatt/saved/2bcc
Since BF4 is being worked on by AMD, AMD components will for sure work better, and since BF3 runs very well on AMD FX, BF4 will probably too. If you get this you get the 7990, which is much more powerful, and you get 8 free games which, if you wait, will include BF4 for free, along with saint row 4 and other AAA games! Hope this helps!
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August 16, 2013 1:26:44 PM

always go for the single gpu over the SLi/xfire build.

You don't say what your monitor is, and if BF4 is built for multi-core optimization like Crysis3, then limiting yourself to an i5 might come back to bite you (we won't know till it's out)... otherwise both builds look alright, though i wouldn't trust an OCZ powersupply. stick with the seasonic family (antec/corsair/XFX)
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August 16, 2013 1:32:18 PM

ingtar33 said:
always go for the single gpu over the SLi/xfire build.

You don't say what your monitor is, and if BF4 is built for multi-core optimization like Crysis3, then limiting yourself to an i5 might come back to bite you (we won't know till it's out)... otherwise both builds look alright, though i wouldn't trust an OCZ powersupply. stick with the seasonic family (antec/corsair/XFX)


I agree with everything, however I think the 7990 at $700 is too good to pass up with 8 free games. Not only that but AMD has mostly fixed crossfire for 1080p and they aren't done. I really think its a steal.
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August 16, 2013 1:38:48 PM

kirilmatthew said:
ingtar33 said:
always go for the single gpu over the SLi/xfire build.

You don't say what your monitor is, and if BF4 is built for multi-core optimization like Crysis3, then limiting yourself to an i5 might come back to bite you (we won't know till it's out)... otherwise both builds look alright, though i wouldn't trust an OCZ powersupply. stick with the seasonic family (antec/corsair/XFX)


I agree with everything, however I think the 7990 at $700 is too good to pass up with 8 free games. Not only that but AMD has mostly fixed crossfire for 1080p and they aren't done. I really think its a steal.


i won't suggest anyone get a 7990 till there are some good 3rd party heatsink options... as THG pointed out in a review, the stock heatsink isn't good enough to keep it from temp throttling in an open benching case, let alone an actual computer case.
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August 16, 2013 1:40:59 PM

ingtar33 said:
kirilmatthew said:
ingtar33 said:
always go for the single gpu over the SLi/xfire build.

You don't say what your monitor is, and if BF4 is built for multi-core optimization like Crysis3, then limiting yourself to an i5 might come back to bite you (we won't know till it's out)... otherwise both builds look alright, though i wouldn't trust an OCZ powersupply. stick with the seasonic family (antec/corsair/XFX)


I agree with everything, however I think the 7990 at $700 is too good to pass up with 8 free games. Not only that but AMD has mostly fixed crossfire for 1080p and they aren't done. I really think its a steal.


i won't suggest anyone get a 7990 till there are some good 3rd party heatsink options... as THG pointed out in a review, the stock heatsink isn't good enough to keep it from temp throttling in an open benching case, let alone an actual computer case.


Everything I has seen indicated they are fine, except when crossfiring 2 7990s.
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August 16, 2013 1:55:20 PM

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-7990-cros...

Quote:
Kelt Reeves of Falcon Northwest sent out the third (and most detailed) feedback message, stating that Falcon hasn't qualified single- or dual-card Radeon HD 7990 configurations because they failed on the bench. His response warrants a quote:

"For single-card, the issue had to do with the cards warping after heating up, causing their cooling fans to rub on the shroud and creating an awful racket. We don’t know if that issue was limited to our samples, and that probably could’ve been fixed with a retention bracket we asked AMD for. That issue became moot, though, because four-way CrossFire is really the only configuration our clientele want a 7990 for. In a dual-GPU setup, two 7970s are slightly faster and exhaust properly, so they are a better option."

A single Radeon HD 7990 has a distinct set of issues. Some can be solved; others cannot. The frame pacing issues pointed out in my launch story may very well be eradicated in the future. But the fact that AMD’s most expensive graphics card jettisons waste heat through its shroud won’t change. And that means you shouldn’t even attempt to cram it into a small form factor enclosure. Assuming a full ATX case, why not snag a pair of 7970s, if that’s the route you want to go? Vanilla (950 MHz) boards are going for as little as $370 each. I can’t think of any situation a single 7990 makes more sense....

When it launched, a generous eight-game bundle had me on the fence about the 7990’s prospects. But after spending time evaluating its thermals and acoustics (to say nothing about its crashes and performance hiccups in CrossFire, which could become a story unto itself), I can’t think of one reason to recommend 7990 to a friend. And, at the end of the day, that’s what this job is all about.
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August 16, 2013 1:58:35 PM

ingtar33 said:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-7990-cros...

Quote:
Kelt Reeves of Falcon Northwest sent out the third (and most detailed) feedback message, stating that Falcon hasn't qualified single- or dual-card Radeon HD 7990 configurations because they failed on the bench. His response warrants a quote:

"For single-card, the issue had to do with the cards warping after heating up, causing their cooling fans to rub on the shroud and creating an awful racket. We don’t know if that issue was limited to our samples, and that probably could’ve been fixed with a retention bracket we asked AMD for. That issue became moot, though, because four-way CrossFire is really the only configuration our clientele want a 7990 for. In a dual-GPU setup, two 7970s are slightly faster and exhaust properly, so they are a better option."

A single Radeon HD 7990 has a distinct set of issues. Some can be solved; others cannot. The frame pacing issues pointed out in my launch story may very well be eradicated in the future. But the fact that AMD’s most expensive graphics card jettisons waste heat through its shroud won’t change. And that means you shouldn’t even attempt to cram it into a small form factor enclosure. Assuming a full ATX case, why not snag a pair of 7970s, if that’s the route you want to go? Vanilla (950 MHz) boards are going for as little as $370 each. I can’t think of any situation a single 7990 makes more sense....

When it launched, a generous eight-game bundle had me on the fence about the 7990’s prospects. But after spending time evaluating its thermals and acoustics (to say nothing about its crashes and performance hiccups in CrossFire, which could become a story unto itself), I can’t think of one reason to recommend 7990 to a friend. And, at the end of the day, that’s what this job is all about.

This is one reviewer, here's another, saying its "cool and quiet on load" : http://m.techradar.com/reviews/pc-mac/pc-components/gra...
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