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600W power supply for a GTX 770?

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August 21, 2013 1:41:15 PM

I am planing to upgrade my computer with a GTX 770 and an i7 3770, but I'm not sure if I need a new power supply or not.

Here are my computer's specs:
-Links provided for easy reference-

=600W OCZ ModXStream Pro Power Supply
=i3 2100 3.1Ghz
------upgrading to i7 3770
---------also adding on a Cooler Master Hyper 212+
=GTX 560 SC
------upgrading to GTX 770 w/ACX cooler
=ASUS P8Z77-V LK Mobo
=G.SKILL Ripjaws Series DDR 1333MHz RAM 8GB (2x4GB)
=500GB Western Digital SATA II Hard Drive *No link because it was just lying around collecting dust and I decided to use it, so I have no idea what model it is.*
------Upgrading to 1TB SATA III Hard Drive
=Disk Drive
=Rosewill Challenger Case
=Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

I know that according to the minimum requirements for my parts I should be ok, but I am still not so sure that I don't need a new power supply. I don't plan to do any overclocking outside of having GPU Boost 2.0 enabled and Turbo Boost on for the CPU.

Any help would be greatly appreciated,
August 21, 2013 1:48:56 PM

The recommendation is 600w at a minimum for that GPU. I always like to tell people to go 100-200w higher than recommended so they have room for expansion and capacitor degradation over time.

A great link to see recommended PSU's for particular GPU's is listed below:

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/NVIDIA-GeForce-C...

My recommendation is to check out the PSU I own currently if your looking for a new one, the Corsair HX750.
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August 21, 2013 1:54:12 PM

If you plan on buying a bronze certified PSU I recommend a 750 or greater. Bronze cert. means the PSU is 80% efficient at load. So with a maximum output of 750w, 20% lost = 150w. 750 - 150 = 600w. This is the recommended wattage for a gtx 770. Now, you need to make sure the PSU has enough power on the single 12v rail. Nvidia recommends 42 amps. If you buy a silver or gold cert. PSU the percentage lost drops to 15 ad 10 respectively.


Not to mention, that OCZ PSU only has 25 amps on the 12v rail, which disqualifies it. Check out something with a stronger 12v rail, preferably a seasonic or corsair.
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August 21, 2013 2:03:30 PM

danielbsipe said:
If you plan on buying a bronze certified PSU I recommend a 750 or greater. Bronze cert. means the PSU is 80% efficient at load. So with a maximum output of 750w, 20% lost = 150w. 750 - 150 = 600w. This is the recommended wattage for a gtx 770. Now, you need to make sure the PSU has enough power on the single 12v rail. Nvidia recommends 42 amps. If you buy a silver or gold cert. PSU the percentage lost drops to 15 ad 10 respectively.


Not to mention, that OCZ PSU only has 25 amps on the 12v rail, which disqualifies it. Check out something with a stronger 12v rail, preferably a seasonic or corsair.


It actually has two 12v rails with 25 amps on each, giving a total of 50 amps. My current graphics card requires 30 amps (i think...)
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Best solution

August 21, 2013 2:07:49 PM

Truthfully, you could probably get away with the 600W PSU. However, if you have the extra cash it would be better to go ahead and get yourself perhaps an 850W. One like this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... would probably last you many many years. If you can envision yourself running SLI, it may be a good idea to move up to 1000W or better as it doesn't cost THAT much more money and then you don't have to worry about doing another upgrade down the line. I personally run 2x GTX Titan and a 3770K on a Seasonic 1000W Platinum PSU and that's been just fantastic so far.

Long story short, you could probably run the rig on 600W, but I would put a PSU at an extremely high priority to upgrade as any risk to the rest of your system isn't worth the $200 it would cost to just upgrade it. You would be running that 600W at a very high load 24/7 and who knows what other components it might take with it if/when it dies.

Hope this helps!
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August 21, 2013 2:16:52 PM

danielbsipe said:
If you plan on buying a bronze certified PSU I recommend a 750 or greater. Bronze cert. means the PSU is 80% efficient at load. So with a maximum output of 750w, 20% lost = 150w. 750 - 150 = 600w. This is the recommended wattage for a gtx 770. Now, you need to make sure the PSU has enough power on the single 12v rail. Nvidia recommends 42 amps. If you buy a silver or gold cert. PSU the percentage lost drops to 15 ad 10 respectively.


Not to mention, that OCZ PSU only has 25 amps on the 12v rail, which disqualifies it. Check out something with a stronger 12v rail, preferably a seasonic or corsair.


I believe it doesn't work that way,any 750w psu will deliver 750w,only difference is that if the efficiency is 80 percent those 750w will be 80 percent of the actual power drawn from the wall-so the psu will draw around 940w from the wall and deliver 750w.
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a b ) Power supply
August 21, 2013 2:18:06 PM

daniel:
efficiency doesn´t mean that 80% efficient 500w power supply will only deliver you 400w
it will still deliver 500w but will need to pull more from the wall to do it...
(of course the really cheap and bad ones will not deliver what the manufacturer is advertising in most cases)...

also 12v rail if separated ( cheaper power supplies have still only single 12v rail even if they claim it is separated because the independent regulation is more expensive to manufacture)
you cannot simply count 25 + 25 gives you a total of 50 amps... it doesn´t work like this...
you need to look at the maximum combined output wattage which is the power supply capable to deliver on 12v rail to count the amps...
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August 21, 2013 2:32:23 PM

dark_globe said:
daniel:
efficiency doesn´t mean that 80% efficient 500w power supply will only deliver you 400w
it will still deliver 500w but will need to pull more from the wall to do it...
(of course the really cheap and bad ones will not deliver what the manufacturer is advertising in most cases)...

also 12v rail if separated ( cheaper power supplies have still only single 12v rail even if they claim it is separated because the independent regulation is more expensive to manufacture)
you cannot simply count 25 + 25 gives you a total of 50 amps... it doesn´t work like this...
you need to look at the maximum combined output wattage which is the power supply capable to deliver on 12v rail to count the amps...


Okay, I never knew that. It's good to learn, thanks again.
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August 21, 2013 3:20:03 PM

dark_globe said:
you don´t want to replace your current power supply with another mediocre unit ,
also 750w is overkill for your system...
get this one :
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
it is cheaper and more reliable than corsair CX...


That would be ideal for my system now, but I don't think I will have enough wattage for the GTX 770 I want to put in.
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May 18, 2014 11:40:00 AM

so much misleading information here that it sickens me.

I run an MSI GTX 770 Lighting card with a 500 watt bronze certified EVGA PSU. i also have an APC unit between the wall and the computer. aside from my computer, i also have a pair of Asus 2560x1440 monitors, a network switch, a cordless phone charging station, a logitech mouse charging station, and a few other little things....

and i have never pulled more than 450 watts from the wall. lets assume all 450 watts being pulled from the wall is going to the computer, only 360 watts of that what the PSU is actually putting out (80% efficiency). that still leaves 140 watts of headroom.

right now i'm just browsing the web and listening to music and only pulling 171 watts from the wall while also charging my laptop through the same APC unit.

those recommendations are there for people who buy really crappy power supplies. like those $20 "600 watt" no name brands with only 20 amps on the 12V rail. a proper 500watt power supply will power a PC with a GTX 770 with ease.

and i happen to know a ton about power management. i run a cluster of Dell PowerEdge R710 servers. and before that it was a cluster of PowerEdge 6800 servers, who together consumed enough power to run all the electronics on a Boeing 747-8
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May 23, 2014 7:45:34 AM

terroralpha said:
so much misleading information here that it sickens me.

I run an MSI GTX 770 Lighting card with a 500 watt bronze certified EVGA PSU. i also have an APC unit between the wall and the computer. aside from my computer, i also have a pair of Asus 2560x1440 monitors, a network switch, a cordless phone charging station, a logitech mouse charging station, and a few other little things....

and i have never pulled more than 450 watts from the wall. lets assume all 450 watts being pulled from the wall is going to the computer, only 360 watts of that what the PSU is actually putting out (80% efficiency). that still leaves 140 watts of headroom.

right now i'm just browsing the web and listening to music and only pulling 171 watts from the wall while also charging my laptop through the same APC unit.

those recommendations are there for people who buy really crappy power supplies. like those $20 "600 watt" no name brands with only 20 amps on the 12V rail. a proper 500watt power supply will power a PC with a GTX 770 with ease.

and i happen to know a ton about power management. i run a cluster of Dell PowerEdge R710 servers. and before that it was a cluster of PowerEdge 6800 servers, who together consumed enough power to run all the electronics on a Boeing 747-8



what overclocking the system, who that affect the power consumption ?

if people suggested me cooler master 550W +80 gold as it's more than enough, so what about OCing, does that consume more power over the rated power for the system ?
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