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Ubuntu & Win 7 in seperate HDD+NTFS data HDD

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August 23, 2013 10:45:39 AM

My system has 1 SSD (win7 NTFS) & 2 HDD (160+1TB for data NTFS).Now I am planning to add Ubuntu 13.04 in the system.

In Ubuntu 12 I tried to dual boot in same HDD(160Gb) with XP.SSD was not there.It was successful But when I removed ubuntu, I lost the MBR.Could not recover it and lost 750 Gb data.

From above experience I decided no more linux+win on same drive ever.So I planned for another small hdd for linux (no ssd). Over internet somebody wrote that even with win 7 and Ubuntu in separate HDD he lost MBR while installing update from ubuntu.Seeing this what I am doing now is Disconnect data cable of SSD and 2 HDD and booting to ubuntu from a usb hdd(ext4). After using ubuntu when required to boot win 7 I reconnect 3 disk drive again after removing USB ubuntu HDD.

Now I need to:
1> Download data with ubuntu and store it on NTFS HDDs.
2> Avoid frequent data cord fiddling when switching OS.
3> both of 1 & 2 without having 0.1% chance of loosing MBR or screwing up NTFS data.

Is there any way out? I invite all to share your valuable insight.Thanks in advance.
a b G Storage
August 23, 2013 10:59:26 AM

You needn't lose data even if the MBR is corrupted; you can always boot into a live session from the Ubuntu disk to get into the hard drive and recover data from it. Ubuntu has driver support for NTFS out of the box, which is best used as a separate partition. I once tried setting up the /HOME directory as an NTFS partition for dual use but ran into difficulties because NTFS doesn't support linux permissions.

As to the question of switching, there are power switches you can install like these

http://compare.ebay.com/like/251236991394?var=lv&ltyp=A...

-- just make sure the PC is powered off when you switch the active drive!
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August 24, 2013 8:27:51 AM

SchizTech said:
You needn't lose data even if the MBR is corrupted; you can always boot into a live session from the Ubuntu disk to get into the hard drive and recover data from it. Ubuntu has driver support for NTFS out of the box, which is best used as a separate partition. I once tried setting up the /HOME directory as an NTFS partition for dual use but ran into difficulties because NTFS doesn't support linux permissions.

As to the question of switching, there are power switches you can install like these

http://compare.ebay.com/like/251236991394?var=lv&ltyp=A...

-- just make sure the PC is powered off when you switch the active drive!


Thanks for the great link.It will be very useful. Will you please elaborate " Ubuntu has driver support for NTFS out of the box, which is best used as a separate partition."-- I am new to ubuntu and linux file system is still not very clear to me.Also shaky to mount those NTFS HDDs in ubuntu.
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Best solution

a b G Storage
August 24, 2013 12:45:54 PM

NTFS is the Windows filesystem. Ubuntu can read and write to NTFS drives, but I had problems when I made the Ubuntu HOME directory (where your user info is stored - docs, pics, music as well as some system settings) as a separate partition in NTFS - hence leave it a separate backup drive in Ubuntu (if you don't do anything fancy with the Ubuntu setup like I tried to that won't be an issue)
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