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Is it worth getting a SATA 3GB/s SSD for a boot drive when I currently have a SATA-III 6Gb/s HDD?

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August 23, 2013 4:01:17 PM

Hi,

I was just wondering whether it is worth buying a small SSD primarily for the OS and all my other stuff on my hard drive.

I currently have a Seagate 1.5TB 3.5" SATA-III 6Gb/s Barracuda Hard Drive - 5900RPM 64MB Cache and am looking at the Crucial 64GB V4 SATA 3GB/s SSD.

I am unsure if this SSD is faster than my HDD, so could someone please advise me if it will be beneficial for me to get this SSD.

Thanks
a b G Storage
August 23, 2013 4:06:59 PM

Any SSD is going to be much faster than your HDD (even a SATA II one, by far). Your HDD may be SATA III, but it doesn't get anywhere near SATA III max transfer speeds, or even SATA II actually. This is just a limitation of HDD's, the physical access of data just isn't as fast as the transfer standard. SSD's on the other hand can easily saturate the SATA standards. I would recommend an SSD for anyone who wants much fast boots or loads, though with a 64GB, you won't fit too much after your OS is loaded, with SSD's they get slower the closer to full you get, so always have at least 10% of your space free, i'd try to find a 120GB at least.
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August 23, 2013 4:11:12 PM

Jaxem said:
Any SSD is going to be much faster than your HDD (even a SATA II one, by far). Your HDD may be SATA III, but it doesn't get anywhere near SATA III max transfer speeds, or even SATA II actually. This is just a limitation of HDD's, the physical access of data just isn't as fast as the transfer standard. SSD's on the other hand can easily saturate the SATA standards. I would recommend an SSD for anyone who wants much fast boots or loads, though with a 64GB, you won't fit too much after your OS is loaded, with SSD's they get slower the closer to full you get, so always have at least 10% of your space free, i'd try to find a 120GB at least.


I agree with Jaxem, almost any SSD is going to be faster than your standard HDD, especially yours since it is only 5900 RPMs. When it comes to SATA II and SATA III and SSDs, there are only a few that come close to saturating the bandwidth of SATA III. But with SATA II, some can actually hit that limit, even though it everyday tasks, you probably wont notice it. I hope this helps!
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a c 523 G Storage
August 23, 2013 4:13:33 PM

SATA 2 (3Gb/s) SSDs are "old-tech". You should get a SATA 3 (6Gb/s) SSD even if your motherboard only has SATA 3Gb/s ports.

SATA 6Gb/s SSDs will have newer firmware, better reliability/compatibility, and better drive longevity than SATA 3Gb/s SSDs.

Here's a SATA 6Gb/s SSD that is $2 more than the Crucial v4: http://www.amazon.com/ADATA-Premier-2-5-Inch-Internal-A...
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August 23, 2013 4:19:12 PM

Good point Dereck47, I wasn't thinking along those lines when I posted. He is right, getting a SATA III SSD would benefit you in the long run, better performance from the overall superior firmware, and when/if you do build a new rig, it can just transfer over and get even more performance out of the 6GB/s line.
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August 23, 2013 4:21:34 PM

Dereck47 said:
SATA 2 (3Gb/s) SSDs are "old-tech". You should get a SATA 3 (6Gb/s) SSD even if your motherboard only has SATA 3Gb/s ports.

SATA 6Gb/s SSDs will have newer firmware, better reliability/compatibility, and better drive longevity than SATA 3Gb/s SSDs.

Here's a SATA 6Gb/s SSD that is $2 more than the Crucial v4: http://www.amazon.com/ADATA-Premier-2-5-Inch-Internal-A...


Thanks for all your responses.

Do you know if it is possible to have the main OS on the SSD but have the users folder on the HDD.

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August 23, 2013 4:27:02 PM

I believe that they will have to been on the SSD due to them being created during OS install, if there is a way around it, I do not know, sorry.
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a b G Storage
August 23, 2013 4:28:01 PM

Tom Burns said:
Dereck47 said:
SATA 2 (3Gb/s) SSDs are "old-tech". You should get a SATA 3 (6Gb/s) SSD even if your motherboard only has SATA 3Gb/s ports.

SATA 6Gb/s SSDs will have newer firmware, better reliability/compatibility, and better drive longevity than SATA 3Gb/s SSDs.

Here's a SATA 6Gb/s SSD that is $2 more than the Crucial v4: http://www.amazon.com/ADATA-Premier-2-5-Inch-Internal-A...


Thanks for all your responses.

Do you know if it is possible to have the main OS on the SSD but have the users folder on the HDD.



The other posters are right about the SATA III drives being better. It's very possible to do what you're asking, you can either accomplish it through folder redirection of all the folders in the user directory (less complicated and less likely to cause problems), or through a windows hack that completely relocates the user directory. The relocation method is as simple as right clicking something like 'downloads' or 'my pictures' going to properties, the location tab, and choosing a new location for that folder. It will still act and work the same, just put it all somewhere different.
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a c 87 G Storage
August 23, 2013 4:30:16 PM

Why is SSD faster?

SSD's can access SMALL FILES much faster. When you hear about an SSD getting 550MB/second Reads for example, that's with a large file only. Smaller files are slower.

A hard drive is even slower. It might do a maximum of say 140MB/second (large files) but only 2MB/second for small files whereas the SSD might be 50x faster.

When you boot up your PC or load a program the SSD is snappier because it's loading various files, many of which are often small.

"SATA3" drive:
Just because it's a "SATA3" drive doesn't mean it's super fast. The 600MB/second (roughly) max speed is a limitation of the SATA CONTROLLER, not the drive itself.

*For a basic Windows installation and programs (no games) get a 120GB SSD such as the Samsung 840 EVO (coming soon). I have my games on my hard drive.
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a c 750 G Storage
August 23, 2013 4:52:20 PM

Tom Burns said:


Thanks for all your responses.

Do you know if it is possible to have the main OS on the SSD but have the users folder on the HDD.



The actual "User" folders, as in C\Users\TomBurns\... is a PITA
The Libraries - Documents/Music/Movies/Downloads/etc....easy as pie.
Applications - you can install wherever you want.

I will advise you, though...a 64GB SSD is right on the edge of being too small. It will work, but you may be spending more time managing the free space than you really should.
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a c 87 G Storage
August 24, 2013 1:13:43 PM

Don't get a 64GB.

A 64GB drive will cost roughly $70. You can find 120GB drives for $100, such as the Samsung 840 (non-Pro).

Other tips:
1) apply overprovisioning (Samsung Magician software for Samsung SSD's). That will make about 15 to 20% non-accessible but prevent massive slowdowns later (Google if you wish. Also another reason to avoid a 64GB drive).

2) Windows Installation might use 30GB or so (depends on RAM amount as well), however it will continue to increase in size due to:
a) Microsoft Updates
b) Restore Points
c) Programs added
d) Browser usage
e) Games Saves (even if installed on another drive, the SAVE GAMES etc are usually in Documents folder).

So don't think you have plenty of space even on a 120GB SSD and start installing games etc. I crept up from 35GB to 105GB over one year, though my dad is at 40GB (I have 16GB RAM and my Hiberfil uses 13GB, though I set my Min/Max of the Pagefile to 2GB).

50GB to 80GB is probably typical for most users after one year, and no games installed on the SSD itself.
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December 20, 2013 4:21:50 AM

I have an ASUS M4A785TD-V EVO motherboard (here is a link with the specs: http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M4A785TDV_EVO/#specifi...).

- So am I correct in understanding that even though I only have SATA I interfaces on my motherboard, I should still get a SATA III SSD?

- Will the connection/pin configurations match?

- Will my PC speeds see an increase over my current platter-type HD? (Right now it's kind of slow, although I have 12GB RAM and a 2.6GHz Quad Core).

- Here is what I want to get: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... - a guy has one that is 1.5 years old with the warranty (which I assume at this point is still good for another few years), and is selling it for $95. IS THAT WORTH IT???

Thank you!!!!

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a b G Storage
December 20, 2013 7:33:41 PM

That is a good deal for the Intel who have a good reputation and you will get many more years of reliable operation from it. You have a SATA 2 motheboard and will achieve good speeds with that SSD. I have a SATA 3 SSD on a SATA 2 motherboard and my Win7 WEI is 7.8, and it seems just as fast as my other SSD's on SATA 3 motherboards. Buy it - it will seem like you just upgraded your whole computer since everything will load faster.
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a b G Storage
December 20, 2013 7:50:50 PM

I recently bought the same SSD you are looking at used from the online auction site for $105 and they were recently being sold new for $114 after rebate for one day only. I've bought five used SSD's and have not had any problems with them. One Intel was at 98%( and still is), two other Intels were at 100%, and the Samsung and Micron are still going strong. If you buy them used you don't have to worry about DOA issues since they've been proven to work. The Intel you are considering is probably rated at writing 10 gb a day for 5 years, so unless you are an extremely heavy user you can expect at least 5 years of service from it and likely more. I've had a new Samsung for about a year and I'm just up to 1.3 TB so far. Your friend can check the life expectancy using the Intel SSD software so you know what you can expect. Again, I would recommend buying it since with no moving parts you can expect it to last for a number of years, and your OS and programs will load significantly faster (no more waiting). I've been waiting for years for computers to be this responsive.
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a b G Storage
December 20, 2013 7:55:25 PM

I have an Intel 320 (SATA 2) on a SATA 2 motherboard (Nvidia chipset) and get a 7.1 WEI. I have a Micron C400 (SATA 3) on a SATA 2 motherboard (Intel chipset) and get a 7.8 WEI.
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December 21, 2013 3:08:14 AM

Go with an SSD it is a million times faster smaller quiter lighter more modern. The thing with SSD is it is generally a little more pricy but it is Definetly worth the extra few dollars. My recommendation would be a corsair neutron series 120gb all though it's a Sata 3 it is great has wonderful speed and comes in a range of colours
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a c 87 G Storage
December 26, 2013 2:58:41 AM

AttiswilDoesPC said:
Go with an SSD it is a million times faster smaller quiter lighter more modern. The thing with SSD is it is generally a little more pricy but it is Definetly worth the extra few dollars. My recommendation would be a corsair neutron series 120gb all though it's a Sata 3 it is great has wonderful speed and comes in a range of colours


It's been FOUR MONTHS since the OP replied. No point in further comments really.

*Does anybody else have the ability to click "Pick As the Solution" on threads they've never started? (I never tried)
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