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Thermal Paste Application Problems

Tags:
  • Gaming
  • Overheat
  • Thermal Compound
  • CPUs
  • Heat
  • Build
  • Short Circuit
Last response: in CPUs
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August 23, 2013 4:12:52 PM

So I have recently purchased all the parts needed for my first gaming PC. I decided I could build it myself, and I have!

Now there is one problem/worry that I have. I bought the Cooler Master Hyper 212 plus to go with my i5-4670k. Being my first computer build I used the entire tube of thermal paste.

After googling around and finding out that was probably a big mistake, I removed the paste with rubbing alcohol and que-tips. I then took it to a local repair shop and asked if they could help me apply a small amount and reseat the heat sink.

Long story short, I watched in horror as he proceeded to glob a lot of white paste that he said was silicon based so I could apply as much as I wanted. Me being very new at all of this, I didn't want to contradict him or even ask him a lot of questions as he was criticizing my choice of Mobo.

So the question is, should I run with the paste that is on there, and monitor the heat? or should I clean it off, use the stock i5 cooler for a few days till I can get some nice thermal paste and take the time to make it look really neat and hopefully do a better job.

Sorry for the long explanation, but I have a decent amount of money tied up in this machine, for me, and would rather give too much info than too little.

Thanks

More about : thermal paste application problems

a b 4 Gaming
a c 110 à CPUs
August 23, 2013 4:32:23 PM

Oh. Yeah, that's... the really crappy stuff. You don't want to use that, and if you paid him to 'help' you, you got ripped off. I'm sorry.

I highly suggest you clean it off, try to get the surfaces of both contacts as mirrored as possible, and then get a little bit of decent thermal paste (it will be grey, and should definitely not be silicone based) and apply it using a preferred method as detailed online. (A lot of us like to use credit cards - I'm ghetto. I use a finger wrapped in a plastic bag to evenly apply a very thin coat of it to the CPU. Remember, it's actually an insulator - it's not there to make a layer, it's there to fill cracks and air bubbles, which are even worse heat conductors.)
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a b 4 Gaming
a c 185 à CPUs
August 23, 2013 4:39:25 PM

Hi,
The guy in the shop is completely wrong. When thermal compound is too thick it actually acts as an insulator.

You use about the size of a pea, then use a credit card to spread it quickly but evenly.

*The PROPER amount of paste is just enough to cover the surface with no gaps, but no more.

Here's a video. This guy spreads the paste using the CPU heatsink itself and claims it works a little better. Suit yourself. http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_3...
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August 23, 2013 4:45:30 PM

DarkSable said:
Oh. Yeah, that's... the really crappy stuff. You don't want to use that, and if you paid him to 'help' you, you got ripped off. I'm sorry.


Do you have any suggestions for a good thermal paste I can buy online? Or even local stores? I have heard the Artic Silver is a real go to, but to be honest, being my first build, applying something that that might short my board if done incorrectly scares me. Are there any really good alternatives to conductive thermal compounds?

And if I do need to by something online, will I be ok to run my computer normaly without damaging anything?




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Best solution

a b 4 Gaming
a c 185 à CPUs
August 23, 2013 4:50:56 PM

JackFalon said:
DarkSable said:
Oh. Yeah, that's... the really crappy stuff. You don't want to use that, and if you paid him to 'help' you, you got ripped off. I'm sorry.


Do you have any suggestions for a good thermal paste I can buy online? Or even local stores? I have heard the Artic Silver is a real go to, but to be honest, being my first build, applying something that that might short my board if done incorrectly scares me. Are there any really good alternatives to conductive thermal compounds?

And if I do need to by something online, will I be ok to run my computer normaly without damaging anything?






Hi,
Many of the pastes are non-conductive. Example:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/as5.htm

Yes, you should be fine to run your PC. I doubt it's overheating, though the CPU likely isn't as cool as it could be with better, and properly applied paste.

Modern CPU's will crash the computer before they will damage themselves. It's a protection feature. Imagine of the pump in a liquid cooler failed.
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August 23, 2013 4:55:55 PM

[/quotemsg]

Hi,
Many of the pastes are non-conductive. Example:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/as5.htm

Yes, you should be fine to run your PC. I doubt it's overheating, though the CPU likely isn't as cool as it could be with better, and properly applied paste.

Modern CPU's will crash the computer before they will damage themselves. It's a protection feature. Imagine of the pump in a liquid cooler failed.[/quotemsg]

Ok awesome thanks! Ill look around and buy some new stuff to do a good job with.

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a b 4 Gaming
a c 110 à CPUs
August 23, 2013 5:20:29 PM

I personally like MX-4 for consistency, but that's just me. Any non-conductive paste will be fine.
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