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do i need to take any special care while touching mobo with bare hands ?

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August 26, 2013 10:33:27 AM


some people say we should touch only the plastic things (like ram , pci slots ) in mobo with bare hands ?

and do i need to worry about static electricity issues while handling the computer components , when i am standing on a non woody ground floor ?
August 26, 2013 10:46:38 AM

well I wouldn't eat cheetos and build a computer at the same time... just wash your hands an dry them before hand.
As for static, just touch a bunch of metal things (case) before touching components.. that's always worked for me.
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a b V Motherboard
August 26, 2013 10:49:46 AM

Well don't rub your hands all over it. Just touch it by the edge and make sure to ground yourself first.
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Best solution

a b V Motherboard
August 26, 2013 12:16:55 PM

I have done 6 builds/0 DOA. It's mostly chance, but I do have some easy suggestions.

First is to go ahead and unbox your parts that have static bags. They can be handled in the bag as long as you don't do any physical damage (Dropping, smashing, etc). In general you want to hold the parts by the edges (look for places where there are no components to accidentally touch, especially anything that looks like a microchip. Microchips are the most sensitive ESD parts. For now I would just grab the edges and lift it out of the box, and place it firmly on the motherboard box or another similar surface.

Go on as usual and prepare your case before even worrying about your motherboard. Add the standoffs and make it ready to just drop it in. Once it looks good you will (at this point) start to check your self.

three things to do)

1) make sure you're not in excessively loose clothing, and that socks are off. socks on floor = static, and loose clothing rubbing on it self is the same. Just a precaution, don't go crazy you don't have to build the PC while naked or anything.

2) make sure you are ready to do what you need to do. Lay out your processor box, memory, etc at hand, so you don't have to get up and get detracted. Again it's just a precaution to make things go smoothly as possible. Don't fret if it doesn't exactly go as planned.

3) at this point you want to make sure you've at least discharged any extra charge you have. Part of ESD is that the charge is so small that you can't notice it, so it's not a guarantee, but the general process is to find something large that is grounded (I usually use a kitchen sink/metal contact) and hold onto that for a minute or two. then go ahead and touch your case as well (hands on metal) to even out any charge between you two. At that point it should be pretty minimal, and it's time to remove your mobo from the bag.


A lot of people like to build & test the motherboard on top of the motherboard box/esd bag. It can be useful for troubleshooting, but I like to add the few parts I need to & then get it in the case asap. I would add the CPU, cooler, Ram and then go ahead & touch the case again (Grounding your self) before picking up the mobo (by the edges, touch as little of the metal on it as your can. silicon base is fine to touch) and placing it into your case.

Then I'd just screw it down gently & make sure i'm not over tightening it at all (can cause shorts, just screw it lightly until it's snug, then give it another 1/8 turn, should be just snug not tight), add the GPU & power cables, etc, and at then add power when it's finally completely ready.



In short, there is just a little special care you need to take. Just be sure you do something to discharge static and ground your self, then to just be aware of any contact that would undo that precaution. It's not very hard to be careful. If you feel too nervous to handle that than you can always get a static strap at your local electronics store (radioshack?) and ground your self to the case.

It is absolutely true that you should handle parts by the plastic. :o 
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August 26, 2013 6:50:43 PM

rylt said:
I have done 6 builds/0 DOA. It's mostly chance, but I do have some easy suggestions.

First is to go ahead and unbox your parts that have static bags. They can be handled in the bag as long as you don't do any physical damage (Dropping, smashing, etc). In general you want to hold the parts by the edges (look for places where there are no components to accidentally touch, especially anything that looks like a microchip. Microchips are the most sensitive ESD parts. For now I would just grab the edges and lift it out of the box, and place it firmly on the motherboard box or another similar surface.

Go on as usual and prepare your case before even worrying about your motherboard. Add the standoffs and make it ready to just drop it in. Once it looks good you will (at this point) start to check your self.

three things to do)

1) make sure you're not in excessively loose clothing, and that socks are off. socks on floor = static, and loose clothing rubbing on it self is the same. Just a precaution, don't go crazy you don't have to build the PC while naked or anything.

2) make sure you are ready to do what you need to do. Lay out your processor box, memory, etc at hand, so you don't have to get up and get detracted. Again it's just a precaution to make things go smoothly as possible. Don't fret if it doesn't exactly go as planned.

3) at this point you want to make sure you've at least discharged any extra charge you have. Part of ESD is that the charge is so small that you can't notice it, so it's not a guarantee, but the general process is to find something large that is grounded (I usually use a kitchen sink/metal contact) and hold onto that for a minute or two. then go ahead and touch your case as well (hands on metal) to even out any charge between you two. At that point it should be pretty minimal, and it's time to remove your mobo from the bag.


A lot of people like to build & test the motherboard on top of the motherboard box/esd bag. It can be useful for troubleshooting, but I like to add the few parts I need to & then get it in the case asap. I would add the CPU, cooler, Ram and then go ahead & touch the case again (Grounding your self) before picking up the mobo (by the edges, touch as little of the metal on it as your can. silicon base is fine to touch) and placing it into your case.

Then I'd just screw it down gently & make sure i'm not over tightening it at all (can cause shorts, just screw it lightly until it's snug, then give it another 1/8 turn, should be just snug not tight), add the GPU & power cables, etc, and at then add power when it's finally completely ready.



In short, there is just a little special care you need to take. Just be sure you do something to discharge static and ground your self, then to just be aware of any contact that would undo that precaution. It's not very hard to be careful. If you feel too nervous to handle that than you can always get a static strap at your local electronics store (radioshack?) and ground your self to the case.

It is absolutely true that you should handle parts by the plastic. :o 


great help .. but why do i need to ground myself by touching metals , when i am actually grounded by standing on a marble floor in bare foot (when my pc is gonna be in wooden table )?
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a b V Motherboard
August 27, 2013 8:55:05 PM

You don't need to touch them constantly. It's just that metals are more conductive, and make it easier to quickly discharge any small charge. Just laying your hand on your case for a few seconds should be good, but I sometimes take a little more precaution when starting out. (i.e. finding something large, conductive, and connected to ground to touch my self & my case to. The reason is that I'm usually on carpet & my case is usually coming out of a plastic bag & Styrofoam container.

It just makes sense to me but it's just a precaution. In my last build I wasn't in the mood to do much more than handle the mobo carefully/ touch the case and it all went fine.
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