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What PSU would i need for this gaming PC?

So im building a new gaming PC, not top of the range but hopefully good enough to play battlefeild 3 on ultra at 60-70+ FPS

Question is what power supply do i need?

SPECS:
8GB (2x4gb) Corsair DDR3 Vengeance

Intel core I5-3570k

Gigabyte GA-Z77-D3H

Zalman Z9

2GB Asus GTX 680

What power supply is needed?

Are all of the parts compatible

Is my motherboard good enough?
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about psu gaming
  1. How about you give us a budget and we'll take it from there.

    Will you be OC'ing?
  2. X79 said:
    How about you give us a budget and we'll take it from there.

    Will you be OC'ing?



    Its around £700, excluding VAT (which is always a bonus)

    I would like to OC it in the future and the 'K' is good for that if im correct?
  3. I'd say ~ 620w. Get a quality PSU from Antec, Seasonic, XFX, Corsair or PC Power and Cooling, Silverstone. At least 80+ bronze quality.
    Full list of good and bad psus here http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx
  4. butremor said:
    I'd say ~ 620w. Get a quality PSU from Antec, Seasonic, XFX, Corsair or PC Power and Cooling, Silverstone. At least 80+ bronze quality.
    Full list of good and bad psus here http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx


    would it cripple the PC if i get a 650w/700w PSU? because its always good to go a little over right?
  5. I already included "little over" in that 620w but if that makes you feel safer you can go 650w. 700w is just too much and money spent irrationally.
  6. Check this then:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: AMD FX-8350 4.0GHz 8-Core Processor (£140.99 @ Aria PC)
    Motherboard: MSI 970A-G46 ATX AM3+ Motherboard (£61.59 @ Dabs)
    Memory: Corsair XMS3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£49.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£64.88 @ Amazon UK)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card (£190.97 @ Dabs)
    Case: BitFenix Shinobi ATX Mid Tower Case (£49.90 @ Amazon UK)
    Power Supply: Corsair Builder 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£67.97 @ Dabs)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer (£12.86 @ Amazon UK)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) (£69.96 @ CCL Computers)
    Total: £709.11
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-27 22:23 BST+0100)


    A larger than needed PSU can be damaging, or just less efficient. If for instance

    a PSU is best at 20% load and has received an 80+ certification of one degree or

    another to guarantee that it delivers power good enough at this level, it won't help

    your cause if you get a gigantic PSU. Such as 1300W, if you only use very little. Because

    then you'll be using below this 20%, where there's no guarantee it will work and thus

    it's better to pick more appropriate PSUs. This build is SLI capable and is quite good.
  7. X79 said:
    Check this then:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: AMD FX-8350 4.0GHz 8-Core Processor (£140.99 @ Aria PC)
    Motherboard: MSI 970A-G46 ATX AM3+ Motherboard (£61.59 @ Dabs)
    Memory: Corsair XMS3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£49.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£64.88 @ Amazon UK)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 760 2GB Video Card (£190.97 @ Dabs)
    Case: BitFenix Shinobi ATX Mid Tower Case (£49.90 @ Amazon UK)
    Power Supply: Corsair Builder 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£67.97 @ Dabs)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer (£12.86 @ Amazon UK)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) (£69.96 @ CCL Computers)
    Total: £709.11
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-27 22:23 BST+0100)


    A larger than needed PSU can be damaging, or just less efficient. If for instance

    a PSU is best at 20% load and has received an 80+ certification of one degree or

    another to guarantee that it delivers power good enough at this level, it won't help

    your cause if you get a gigantic PSU. Such as 1300W, if you only use very little. Because

    then you'll be using below this 20%, where there's no guarantee it will work and thus

    it's better to pick more appropriate PSUs. This build is SLI capable and is quite good.



    Dude, awesome build thank you so much! :D

    Just one little thing could the AMD processor be changed to an intel one? a couple of my mates have had problems with AMD, not fully understood what but its steered me away from them a little bit
  8. Best answer
    Well I'd argue it's the same as with other brands. Some people swear by WD

    HDDs and some stay far away from Seagate HDDs. There's nothing wrong with AMD

    per-se. You still get a lot of juice and usually more overclocking. They're cheaper too,

    hence they often fit into budget builds as well. Nonetheless:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£169.99 @ Aria PC)
    Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G43 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£71.99 @ Amazon UK)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£54.98 @ Amazon UK)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£64.88 @ Amazon UK)
    Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£174.95 @ Scan.co.uk)
    Case: BitFenix Shinobi ATX Mid Tower Case (£49.90 @ Amazon UK)
    Power Supply: OCZ ZS 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply (£51.59 @ Dabs)
    Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224DB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer (£12.86 @ Amazon UK)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) (£69.96 @ CCL Computers)
    Total: £721.10
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-27 22:54 BST+0100)

    To not blow the budget completely, I couldn't put in an SLI ready motherboard.

    Instead it's only CF ready and consequently I put in a Radeon card... Which is also

    made by AMD, so you might not be happy about that. It's said they don't run as well

    as Nvidia cards, when it comes to their multi-GPU configurations (CF), but recent driver

    releases suggest they've gotten better. The good thing about this GPU, is that you get

    some free games too. The PSU also had to be lowered due to the budget. Have to say I prefer

    the other build. Eitherway it's some pretty good performance you're in for. I'll be the first to

    say that the CPU isn't the newest in Intels lineup. It's one generation behind. But it's the

    one which is best for overclocking, compared to the most recent generation. It's still a solid

    CPU and the performance difference is nigh 10% or so. The 4th generation CPU (as opposed

    to this 3rd gen one) was also more expensive and wasn't easy to accommodate in the build.

    I also got the impression you wouldn't be OC'ing right away. Hence I didn't add an aftermarket

    CPU cooler of any kind; thus you'll go with stock. I figured you could just buy it later, when

    you actually intended to OC, seeing as OC'ing doesn't necessarily give a performance

    boost; neither in speed nor in games. OC'ing generally makes things more expensive:

    motherboard chipsets, adequate PSUs, K-edition SKUs and extra cooling equipment.
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