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High End Gaming/Work/Virtual PC

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August 28, 2013 2:41:49 PM

Hi,

I would like some help with a new build config, please see my answers below:

Approximate Purchase Date: Next four months

Budget Range: 3K. I'll buy parts across the next four months or so, or in one lump sum.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming & Running several virtual machines. Will be doing several test labs, so needs to be HyperV compatible. But I also want to snipe some people in BF3.

Parts Not Required: Already own the monitor

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: N/A

Country: UK

Parts Preferences: I prefer Intel CPU along with Nvidia GPU's

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe - I would like to future proof this machine...Either via SLI or one powerful GPU.

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: It won't be water cooled, and due to my using of Virtual Machines (VMWare) I will need a couple of SSD's for the VHD's.

But I would also like a couple of 1-2 TB HDD's for storage/backup.

Below is what i was looking at:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($563.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: Asus Rampage IV Extreme EATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($415.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory ($354.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Corsair Neutron Series GTX 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($219.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Corsair Neutron Series GTX 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($219.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($108.99 @ Dell Small Business)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($108.99 @ Dell Small Business)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card ($509.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master HAF X ATX Full Tower Case ($179.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($186.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $2899.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-08-28 17:41 EDT-0400)

More about : high end gaming work virtual

August 28, 2013 3:04:15 PM

Looks alright, but I would make some modifications.

The Hyper 212 should be replaced with an h110, check compatibility for 280mm radiator@ CM Haf X

The Motherboard is the biggest problem on this build. A 415 dollar 2011 board is nothing more than a pure waste of money. That board costs that much because it has 4 pcie lanes, something required if you want to run 4 780s. Seeing as you don't, you want an ASUS P9X79 LE. That will save you 200 dollars without losing any performance.

Ram seems ok, though I would go for 1600C9 RAM as it is cheaper and 2133 doesn't offers world performance over 1600.

If you want Corsair's SSD's I understand, but know that they are not nearly as good as Samsung's 840 Pro. No drive on the market competes with Samsung's inhouse components. Beyond that, raid is a pain to deal with trim incompatibility and I would stay away from it. However, trim should work in raid with Z87 boards (but you have x79), and how that is done is not too clear to me, something related to one of intel's rst drivers. Whats more is raid offers no real world speed gains, is actually the same or slower at loading programs, game screens, and windows. The only benefit raid offers comes when moving files around your desktop. I would definitely recommend a 512GB Samsung 840 pro SSD or 480 Corsair gtx alternative. They will have larger life spans because they contain more mlc blocks, and have better performance at 20%,50%,75%, and 100% capacity due to a larger cache of hidden space. Usually like 6% I think of the drives specified space has been hidden for SSD operations and the larger the cache the better the performance. 6% of 512 or 480 is bigger than 6% of 240. Food for thought

218$ for 2TB of storage is outrageous. I would strongly urge you toward Seagate Desktop HDD.15 ST4000DM000 5900 RPM 64MB Cache 4TB Nas for 180 drive or the Seagate 2TB Barracuda

Video card looks incredibly overpriced but well worth it if you need the VRAM. Seeing as your resolution is only 1920x1080, I suggest an ASUS/MSI/EVGA 770 with 2GB of VRAM unless you are very interested in modding skyrim to death.

Case is preference but if you haven't given Cooler Masters Storm Trooper a look, please do

PSU looks perfect,

-Prax
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August 28, 2013 3:36:14 PM

Praxeology said:
Looks alright, but I would make some modifications.

The Hyper 212 should be replaced with an h110, check compatibility for 280mm radiator@ CM Haf X

The Motherboard is the biggest problem on this build. A 415 dollar 2011 board is nothing more than a pure waste of money. That board costs that much because it has 4 pcie lanes, something required if you want to run 4 780s. Seeing as you don't, you want an ASUS P9X79 LE. That will save you 200 dollars without losing any performance.

Ram seems ok, though I would go for 1600C9 RAM as it is cheaper and 2133 doesn't offers world performance over 1600.

If you want Corsair's SSD's I understand, but know that they are not nearly as good as Samsung's 840 Pro. No drive on the market competes with Samsung's inhouse components. Beyond that, raid is a pain to deal with trim incompatibility and I would stay away from it. However, trim should work in raid with Z87 boards (but you have x79), and how that is done is not too clear to me, something related to one of intel's rst drivers. Whats more is raid offers no real world speed gains, is actually the same or slower at loading programs, game screens, and windows. The only benefit raid offers comes when moving files around your desktop. I would definitely recommend a 512GB Samsung 840 pro SSD or 480 Corsair gtx alternative. They will have larger life spans because they contain more mlc blocks, and have better performance at 20%,50%,75%, and 100% capacity due to a larger cache of hidden space. Usually like 6% I think of the drives specified space has been hidden for SSD operations and the larger the cache the better the performance. 6% of 512 or 480 is bigger than 6% of 240. Food for thought

218$ for 2TB of storage is outrageous. I would strongly urge you toward Seagate Desktop HDD.15 ST4000DM000 5900 RPM 64MB Cache 4TB Nas for 180 drive or the Seagate 2TB Barracuda

Video card looks incredibly overpriced but well worth it if you need the VRAM. Seeing as your resolution is only 1920x1080, I suggest an ASUS/MSI/EVGA 770 with 2GB of VRAM unless you are very interested in modding skyrim to death.

Case is preference but if you haven't given Cooler Masters Storm Trooper a look, please do

PSU looks perfect,

-Prax


Thanks for the reply, i will look in to the H110, and as for the Motherboard, that does infact look like a better choice.

I was thinking of Samsung SSD's, and read a little in to their in house components, however if the Samsung offers better life on SSD's, I would rather have that...But I am in no mind bias towards any brand when it comes to SSD's. And I don't plan on running any form of RAID on my system, It will be a case of - 1 SSD for OS/APPs/Settings, and another SSD purely for the virtual machines.

I will then have two hard disks, each one to be partitioned in to two drives with one partition been the size of the SSD's and rest to be used as storage. That way I have two separate hard disks for both of the SSD's and then ample space for storing, movies/music/applications/disc backups on one and then the other for random crap. And I will probably want to add more SSD's at some future point too.

Though the HDD disk at 4TB looks a lot better, and I will purchase two of them...

As for the GPU, I would like to go max resolution, but am currently limited by my current GPU which is HEAVILY out dated. Probably worth a few thousand as a relic...

Looking at that other case, it's looking pretty good as well...Choices, choices...
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August 28, 2013 4:00:03 PM

Praxeology said:
Looks alright, but I would make some modifications.

The Hyper 212 should be replaced with an h110, check compatibility for 280mm radiator@ CM Haf X

The Motherboard is the biggest problem on this build. A 415 dollar 2011 board is nothing more than a pure waste of money. That board costs that much because it has 4 pcie lanes, something required if you want to run 4 780s. Seeing as you don't, you want an ASUS P9X79 LE. That will save you 200 dollars without losing any performance.


I am in complete, total agreement on the motherboard. However, for the cooler I may suggest either the Swiftech Edge (not the H220) or the NZXT X60. The X60 uses the same Asetek radiator that the H100 does but has better fans (which Corsair - although they make a lot of great products, are notorious for going cheap on the fans) and a better heat sink.

Corsair SSDs are not that great, and I don't get the use of putting them in RAID mode - that's just asking for failure. And on this kind of machine there should be no room for failure.
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August 28, 2013 8:00:56 PM

breadbun said:
Praxeology said:
Looks alright, but I would make some modifications.

The Hyper 212 should be replaced with an h110, check compatibility for 280mm radiator@ CM Haf X

The Motherboard is the biggest problem on this build. A 415 dollar 2011 board is nothing more than a pure waste of money. That board costs that much because it has 4 pcie lanes, something required if you want to run 4 780s. Seeing as you don't, you want an ASUS P9X79 LE. That will save you 200 dollars without losing any performance.

Ram seems ok, though I would go for 1600C9 RAM as it is cheaper and 2133 doesn't offers world performance over 1600.

If you want Corsair's SSD's I understand, but know that they are not nearly as good as Samsung's 840 Pro. No drive on the market competes with Samsung's inhouse components. Beyond that, raid is a pain to deal with trim incompatibility and I would stay away from it. However, trim should work in raid with Z87 boards (but you have x79), and how that is done is not too clear to me, something related to one of intel's rst drivers. Whats more is raid offers no real world speed gains, is actually the same or slower at loading programs, game screens, and windows. The only benefit raid offers comes when moving files around your desktop. I would definitely recommend a 512GB Samsung 840 pro SSD or 480 Corsair gtx alternative. They will have larger life spans because they contain more mlc blocks, and have better performance at 20%,50%,75%, and 100% capacity due to a larger cache of hidden space. Usually like 6% I think of the drives specified space has been hidden for SSD operations and the larger the cache the better the performance. 6% of 512 or 480 is bigger than 6% of 240. Food for thought

218$ for 2TB of storage is outrageous. I would strongly urge you toward Seagate Desktop HDD.15 ST4000DM000 5900 RPM 64MB Cache 4TB Nas for 180 drive or the Seagate 2TB Barracuda

Video card looks incredibly overpriced but well worth it if you need the VRAM. Seeing as your resolution is only 1920x1080, I suggest an ASUS/MSI/EVGA 770 with 2GB of VRAM unless you are very interested in modding skyrim to death.

Case is preference but if you haven't given Cooler Masters Storm Trooper a look, please do

PSU looks perfect,

-Prax


Thanks for the reply, i will look in to the H110, and as for the Motherboard, that does infact look like a better choice.

I was thinking of Samsung SSD's, and read a little in to their in house components, however if the Samsung offers better life on SSD's, I would rather have that...But I am in no mind bias towards any brand when it comes to SSD's. And I don't plan on running any form of RAID on my system, It will be a case of - 1 SSD for OS/APPs/Settings, and another SSD purely for the virtual machines.

I will then have two hard disks, each one to be partitioned in to two drives with one partition been the size of the SSD's and rest to be used as storage. That way I have two separate hard disks for both of the SSD's and then ample space for storing, movies/music/applications/disc backups on one and then the other for random crap. And I will probably want to add more SSD's at some future point too.

Though the HDD disk at 4TB looks a lot better, and I will purchase two of them...

As for the GPU, I would like to go max resolution, but am currently limited by my current GPU which is HEAVILY out dated. Probably worth a few thousand as a relic...

Looking at that other case, it's looking pretty good as well...Choices, choices...


That all makes good sense. I am glad to see that Seagate's products are being considered, because they are quite good and optimized for speed; their 5900 RPM model 4TB Nas model I recommended will run 100+R/W and at that price it can't be beat. It seems most people just go with western digital on the forums without looking into it. Regardless, either can definitely serve your purposes.

By "I'd like to max resolution," do you mean you would like to get a $1200, 1600p monitor but haven't because of your older GPU? If that is the case, then you have need for the extra 2GB of VRAM, so that 4GB model looks terrific, and EVGA's customer support is second to none.

For the SSD, when I tell someone to buy product x instead of product y I assure you that it has nothing to do with brand bias, but performance. Corsair, Plextor, and most SSD brands do not manufacture the flash memory, cache memory, or controller in their products. They instead choose what components (from the OEMs they buy them from) to package their SSD with, to produce an end-product that has specific pros and cons, and tops it off with some firmware tweaks. This creates an SSD market where everyone has access to everyone elses internal components. A sandforce controller with toshiba memory from company x is going to have very similar performance & pros / cons as company y who went with the same components. This WAS the market until Samsung, the world largest memory manufacturer, entered the marketplace. They developed their own controller, NAND flash memory, and cache memory of which no one else in the market has access to. This gives Samsung a competitive advantage, assuming its controller, NAND, and cache memory perform better than the competition, and it just so happens that that is indeed the case. What's more is that the other company's can't really stop Samsung, because they don't have access to their in-house components that are wiping the floor with the compeition. This is why I recommend the 840 Pro, because to put simply, it has the highest performance, with Samsung reliability, and the reason it can't be beat is above.

To address the poster above me about the h110s less than amazing fans, I agree with him. The stock fans on the h110 are not as good as Corsair's aftermarket alternatives. But the h110 outperforms the competition, and if the fans are inadequately quiet for an individual, they can easily buy some noctua aftermarket fans for 30 bucks which is what plenty have done. However the reason why the h110 is not using good quality Corsair fans is because they have not been produced yet. On the original h100, Corsair's aftermarket fans didn't exist which is why Corsair used their stock fans (which again, got the job done better than the competition). This is why they are currently the top dog on sales in the closed-loop liquid cooling market. They then developed their AF/SP (air-flow and static pressure respectively used for case fans and radiators) aftermarket fans and continued to dominate the closed-water loop market till today. They released the h100i which had the newly developed fans and they obviously performed better. They currently only have 140MM AF fans, not SP, which is why the h110 comes with their stock fans (which again STILL outperforms the competition) instead of their SP alternatives. It logical to assume they are working on 140MM SP fans which they will release to the market for sale, and relaunch an h110i which uses them.

To conclude, I would urge the OP toward that Cooler Master Storm Trooper case over the HAF, Samsung's 840 Pro (Pro only, not Samsung's 840), and of course the h110 (make sure your case fits 2 140mm fans at the top, or get an h100i 2 120mm fans if it cannot.

- Prax
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August 28, 2013 11:08:18 PM

Praxeology said:

To address the poster above me about the h110s less than amazing fans, I agree with him. The stock fans on the h110 are not as good as Corsair's aftermarket alternatives. But the h110 outperforms the competition, and if the fans are inadequately quiet for an individual, they can easily buy some noctua aftermarket fans for 30 bucks which is what plenty have done. However the reason why the h110 is not using good quality Corsair fans is because they have not been produced yet. On the original h100, Corsair's aftermarket fans didn't exist which is why Corsair used their stock fans (which again, got the job done better than the competition). This is why they are currently the top dog on sales in the closed-loop liquid cooling market. They then developed their AF/SP (air-flow and static pressure respectively used for case fans and radiators) aftermarket fans and continued to dominate the closed-water loop market till today. They released the h100i which had the newly developed fans and they obviously performed better. They currently only have 140MM AF fans, not SP, which is why the h110 comes with their stock fans (which again STILL outperforms the competition) instead of their SP alternatives. It logical to assume they are working on 140MM SP fans which they will release to the market for sale, and relaunch an h110i which uses them.

To conclude, I would urge the OP toward that Cooler Master Storm Trooper case over the HAF, Samsung's 840 Pro (Pro only, not Samsung's 840), and of course the h110 (make sure your case fits 2 140mm fans at the top, or get an h100i 2 120mm fans if it cannot.

- Prax


The reason why I suggested the Swiftech Edge (not the H220) over the Corsair is because most closed block loops are based around two fan radiators. The Edge can have up to three. And unlike the H100, the Edge can be converted to a full custom loop to include the CPUs and GPUs.
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Best solution

August 29, 2013 3:41:08 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Praxeology said:

To address the poster above me about the h110s less than amazing fans, I agree with him. The stock fans on the h110 are not as good as Corsair's aftermarket alternatives. But the h110 outperforms the competition, and if the fans are inadequately quiet for an individual, they can easily buy some noctua aftermarket fans for 30 bucks which is what plenty have done. However the reason why the h110 is not using good quality Corsair fans is because they have not been produced yet. On the original h100, Corsair's aftermarket fans didn't exist which is why Corsair used their stock fans (which again, got the job done better than the competition). This is why they are currently the top dog on sales in the closed-loop liquid cooling market. They then developed their AF/SP (air-flow and static pressure respectively used for case fans and radiators) aftermarket fans and continued to dominate the closed-water loop market till today. They released the h100i which had the newly developed fans and they obviously performed better. They currently only have 140MM AF fans, not SP, which is why the h110 comes with their stock fans (which again STILL outperforms the competition) instead of their SP alternatives. It logical to assume they are working on 140MM SP fans which they will release to the market for sale, and relaunch an h110i which uses them.

To conclude, I would urge the OP toward that Cooler Master Storm Trooper case over the HAF, Samsung's 840 Pro (Pro only, not Samsung's 840), and of course the h110 (make sure your case fits 2 140mm fans at the top, or get an h100i 2 120mm fans if it cannot.

- Prax


The reason why I suggested the Swiftech Edge (not the H220) over the Corsair is because most closed block loops are based around two fan radiators. The Edge can have up to three. And unlike the H100, the Edge can be converted to a full custom loop to include the CPUs and GPUs.


That sounds interesting but must be much more expensive making the product noncompetitive. I was only talking about more tradition closed water loop radiators in the $100 range. I can't find the Swiftech H2O-X20 on newegg, tigerdirect, or amazon (Though there is 1 used for sale for 150$) or even australia's PCCaseGear, and it seems to be the only 3 fanned closed loop system. I remember reading the articles on that cooler and just moved right along. If I wanted to watercool my gpu I would go with a full custom water loop, but I see no reason in ever watercooling gpu outside of a quadfire setup. And if I quadfire I would use 2 dual-gpu cards making a custom loop a nonfactor. Interesting product though,

Prax
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