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Factory installed RAM speed more than what processor supports

Last response: in Systems
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August 28, 2013 6:24:07 PM

I was looking at a notebook's specs:

http://www.tesco.com/direct/dell-inspiron-n5040-laptop-...

It says that the pre-installed 4GB RAM is PC3-10666 (1333 MHz) and the processor is Intel Core i3-380M. The processor's specs says:

Memory Types: DDR3-800/1066

That means the processor supports maximum 1066 MHz, so why the notebook is pre-installed with 1333 MHz RAM?
August 28, 2013 6:46:27 PM

The motherboard automatically downclocks the ram, that combo is more stable than a match.
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August 28, 2013 6:47:46 PM

it is a luck since the memory they put in will work at max speed the cpu could and it wont bottleneck your system .
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August 28, 2013 7:01:17 PM

ur6beersaway said:
...that combo is more stable than a match.


This is interesting. Please tell how that combo is more stable than a match? Isn't high frequency RAM being downclocked a waste of money? The difference in price may be small but when Dell is manufacturing so many systems, it multiplies.
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August 28, 2013 7:08:33 PM

That's simply the CPU's spec speed at default, most any Intel CPU can run DRAM far faster than spec, look at the 2500K or 2570K, spec is 1333 and they'll run 1866 sticks out of the box, it's no big deal - actually could consider they did you a favor, but trust me, you paid for the DRAM ;)  enjoy it and have fun
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August 28, 2013 7:31:01 PM

Tradesman1 said:
That's simply the CPU's spec speed at default, most any Intel CPU can run DRAM far faster than spec, look at the 2500K or 2570K, spec is 1333 and they'll run 1866 sticks out of the box, it's no big deal - actually could consider they did you a favor, but trust me, you paid for the DRAM ;)  enjoy it and have fun


Thanks! Learned something new. So just confirming: Most Intel processors can run RAMs at higher frequency than what Intel says in its specs? - Without overclocking? (I don't know exactly what overlocking is) I'm not talking about compatibility, but talking about actual increase in system's performance?

What's the meaning of word "default" in "That's simply the CPU's spec speed at default" ?
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August 28, 2013 7:38:44 PM

Yes, usually one tier speed better, really depends on the chip you wind up with.
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August 28, 2013 8:02:24 PM

With Intel 1866 has long been the so-called break point where a CPU may be required for running, but with turbo boost, the MC has been strengthen (because technically the CPU get's OCed from base when it get used (interesting since Intel says OCing not allowed. sort of like the unlocked CPUs and OCing not allowed ;)  ) but IB (1333 base) can gen do 2 steps to 1866 and often 3 to 2133, SB generally 1866, Haswell 1600 base more often than not 2133 and up on stock
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August 28, 2013 8:31:32 PM

Intel list spec or default DRAM freq that the CPU is rated for at it's stock clock, when the CPU runs faster than the spec clock it can generally handle faster DRAM (it can anyway as Intel under - specs CPUs)
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August 28, 2013 8:41:34 PM

Thank you guys! My question has been excellently answered. :) 

I think Intel must be under-spec-ing because higher frequency RAM means more heat?
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August 28, 2013 9:00:31 PM

Very little, DRAM seldom runs hot unless it is OCed beyond it's spec, the heat will come from the CPU itself when OCing and raising voltages is needed - even high freq DRAM that calls for a voltage of 1.65 generates little heat - this isn't so true with AMD and their weak MCs (memory controllers) with Intel to go from 1600 to 2666 might require a rise of the MC voltage of 0.06 or a little more on AMD going from 1333 to 1866 can take a fulle 0.10 or even 0.20 or more
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August 28, 2013 9:13:05 PM

Tradesman1 said:
Very little, DRAM seldom runs hot unless it is OCed beyond it's spec, the heat will come from the CPU itself when OCing and raising voltages is needed - even high freq DRAM that calls for a voltage of 1.65 generates little heat - this isn't so true with AMD and their weak MCs (memory controllers) with Intel to go from 1600 to 2666 might require a rise of the MC voltage of 0.06 or a little more on AMD going from 1333 to 1866 can take a fulle 0.10 or even 0.20 or more


Wow! You give such nice answers even for side questions. Thank you so much :) 
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