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why it is called TCP/IP not UDP/IP

Tags:
  • IP
  • UDP
  • Networking
  • TCP/IP
Last response: in Networking
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August 30, 2013 5:35:00 AM

Hi all
the network model TCP/IP,

why it is not called UDP/IP

regards,

More about : called tcp udp

August 30, 2013 5:38:33 AM

ah that actually made me laugh. the best answer i can give you is this, go to wikipedia, and look up "internet protocol" (without quotes)
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August 30, 2013 5:42:58 AM

It tried that but there is no clear answer
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August 30, 2013 5:55:12 AM

oudmaster said:
It tried that but there is no clear answer


there most definitely is an answer, you just did not have the patience to read it. so i'll give you the ultra-short version, the "internet protocol" is is a suite, and it offers different comm methods depending on the app's design && / || requirements. tcp is one method. udp is another.
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August 30, 2013 6:05:58 AM

so does that mean UDP/IP is another network model ???
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Best solution

August 30, 2013 6:23:50 AM

oudmaster said:
so does that mean UDP/IP is another network model ???


i am beginning to wonder whether you are asking about just the name. as in "why is linux not called gnu/linux"?

in case you're not, the easy answer is this:

tcp and udp are two different protocols in the same suite. when you are creating a connection (a "socket") you specify which protocol you want to use for *that specific connection* (meaning the same application can use tcp in one case and udp in another) and, tcp - udp are two of the options. tcp is normally used when reliability is more important than speed, while udp is normally used for speed over reliability or when you want to apply your own management logic instead of using that provided by tcp. this is an oversimplification of course, but if you want more info, there's plenty of it around.

as an easy example, a multiplayer networked game, or a video application would favor use of udp to transfer data at the best possible speed and either tolerating transmission errors or implementing error detection and correction at the application level, while a remote data access app would tend to favor tcp and have guaranteed safe delivery of the data. once again, they are oversimplifications, it's just to give you an idea.

so i suppose that the answer to your last question is no, they are the same networking model but offering different features.
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August 30, 2013 6:42:10 AM

thanks a lot
now it is clear

actully I was confused because of the name only,
I was thinking if TCP and UDP are different protocols, and there is TCP/IP, then there must be a UDP/IP.
otherwise they will combine the name as Internet Protocol Suite


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August 30, 2013 6:51:17 AM

oudmaster said:
thanks a lot
now it is clear

actully I was confused because of the name only,
I was thinking if TCP and UDP are different protocols, and there is TCP/IP, then there must be a UDP/IP.
otherwise they will combine the name as Internet Protocol Suite




ok. i suppose it's just a shorthand really, we always called it "tcp" or "tcp/ip" as it's shorter and more convenient than saying "internet protocol", although in my experience people occasionally did call it internet protocol, which as an aside also does not verbally commit you to actually using tcp.
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