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Is newegg doing the right thing in this video on a PC build?

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September 1, 2013 12:59:24 PM

This video by Newegg describes the installation a new build surrounding the case that I got for mine. In it we can see her installing the Memory, CPU and Cooler while the motherboard is sitting on top of the box it came in. Is that a good idea or will a wooden table do as well? I've heard of anti-static mats but they are prohibitively expensive. Is newegg crazy or is all of this "anti-static mat" business a lot of hype? I do have an anti-static wristband but am not sure where to attach that when working on the motherboard (outside the case, of course).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddPhprluds0
a c 235 V Motherboard
September 1, 2013 1:06:33 PM

The box, a wooden table, a wood floor, glass table...all would work. Just avoid doing it on carpet.
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September 1, 2013 1:09:56 PM

Install your PSU first. Make sure it is turned off. Plug it in. You may now attach your wristband to the case.
Any flat sturdy surface will do as a work bench.
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a b V Motherboard
September 1, 2013 1:12:44 PM

i build mine on top of the static bag that the board comes in...with foam underneath..........on a "plastic" table.
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a c 235 V Motherboard
September 1, 2013 1:17:26 PM

Bottom line - you do not need an anti-static mat to do this. Hell...I've put in new parts on the front seat of a car, or the back of a pickup truck.
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Best solution

a b V Motherboard
September 1, 2013 1:20:14 PM

USAFRet said:
Bottom line - you do not need an anti-static mat to do this. Hell...I've put in new parts on the front seat of a car, or the back of a pickup truck.


I built one on a roller coaster.
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September 1, 2013 2:48:37 PM

swifty_morgan said:
USAFRet said:
Bottom line - you do not need an anti-static mat to do this. Hell...I've put in new parts on the front seat of a car, or the back of a pickup truck.


I built one on a roller coaster.


Give me a break! That is too damn corny for words. I'm not trying to juggle my girlfriend, a meatroll and a motherboard with one hand while steering a rollercoaster with another. The table (wooden), the box or a glass table sound like better surfaces and working conditions. I have a smallish wooden cabinet I use to store my externals and DVD-r's. I'll use that. It's just big enough for the mobo.

Scrap the glass table. I aint trying to bark my kneecaps on that!!

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a c 95 V Motherboard
September 1, 2013 3:00:31 PM

knightmike said:
Install your PSU first. Make sure it is turned off. Plug it in. You may now attach your wristband to the case.
Any flat sturdy surface will do as a work bench.


NO NOT EVER

do not work in a computer case that is connected to mains power . You do not need to ground the case , and plugging it in like this carries a risk of electrocution and death .


All you need to do is eliminate electrical potential between you , the components you handle , and the case . A wrist strap does this , but then so does briefly touching the case immediately b4 you pick up a component to place in it .

I assemble my motherboards on the bag they came in , and that is usually on a the foam that it was packed in to cushion it a little
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September 1, 2013 3:19:54 PM

Outlander_04 said:
knightmike said:
Install your PSU first. Make sure it is turned off. Plug it in. You may now attach your wristband to the case.
Any flat sturdy surface will do as a work bench.


NO NOT EVER

do not work in a computer case that is connected to mains power . You do not need to ground the case , and plugging it in like this carries a risk of electrocution and death .


All you need to do is eliminate electrical potential between you , the components you handle , and the case . A wrist strap does this , but then so does briefly touching the case immediately b4 you pick up a component to place in it .

I assemble my motherboards on the bag they came in , and that is usually on a the foam that it was packed in to cushion it a little


I like this solution the best. The only remaining question I have is where to attach the wrist strap. I'll be working in a smallish area but the cabinet I'm using to place the mobo on will be close to the case. Should I attached the clip of the wristband to the case as I'm working on the motherboard?

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September 1, 2013 4:12:40 PM

Outlander_04 said:
knightmike said:
Install your PSU first. Make sure it is turned off. Plug it in. You may now attach your wristband to the case.
Any flat sturdy surface will do as a work bench.


NO NOT EVER

do not work in a computer case that is connected to mains power . You do not need to ground the case , and plugging it in like this carries a risk of electrocution and death .


Wow. Just wow. Plugging it in with the power switch in the off position is effectively the same thing as it not being plugged in except for one important difference. The ground is still grounded which is exactly what you want. Your suggestion is far worse. Will placing the case on an insulator and touching it eliminate the potential between you and the case? Yes. Will it eliminate the potential between you and the parts? Absolutely not. But then again...I was only an electrician for 10 years.
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a c 95 V Motherboard
September 1, 2013 4:39:22 PM

knightmike said:
Outlander_04 said:
knightmike said:
Install your PSU first. Make sure it is turned off. Plug it in. You may now attach your wristband to the case.
Any flat sturdy surface will do as a work bench.


NO NOT EVER

do not work in a computer case that is connected to mains power . You do not need to ground the case , and plugging it in like this carries a risk of electrocution and death .


Wow. Just wow. Plugging it in with the power switch in the off position is effectively the same thing as it not being plugged in except for one important difference. The ground is still grounded which is exactly what you want. Your suggestion is far worse. Will placing the case on an insulator and touching it eliminate the potential between you and the case? Yes. Will it eliminate the potential between you and the parts? Absolutely not. But then again...I was only an electrician for 10 years.


Im glad you were an electrician . Im sure that means you know that sometimes sockets dont get connected correctly , and Im sure you know that in some countries the neutral wire is also connected to earth . This usually safer , but in the method you describe could be fatal if someone has inadvertently wired the wall plug wrong .

Since it also increases the chance of damaging your components with ESD , BECAUSE YOU HAVE PROVIDED A PATH TO EARTH FOR ANY STATIC BUILD UP , your technique is a lose /lose situation .

Eliminate the potential between yourself , the case and the components . Nothing else is required

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September 1, 2013 8:32:24 PM

ESD is exactly why you should ground yourself and the case. While earth voltage varies depending on where you are, it's still your best chance to equalize the potential between you and the parts. The parts are grounded at the factory. You and the case may very well be a capacitor that will shock a part.
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a b V Motherboard
September 2, 2013 1:28:45 AM

i always put the ps in last. keeps the work area clean to work in. the wires always get in the way.

if you use a wrist strap ( i never have ) you can wrap it around your ankle to keep your hands free. don't work on carpet and wear sneakers/shoes/boots.
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a c 95 V Motherboard
September 2, 2013 5:08:27 AM

knightmike said:
ESD is exactly why you should ground yourself and the case. While earth voltage varies depending on where you are, it's still your best chance to equalize the potential between you and the parts. The parts are grounded at the factory. You and the case may very well be a capacitor that will shock a part.


I thought this might amuse you , and inform other less experienced builders who value staying alive
http://www.buildyourown.org.uk/pc-information/safety-pr...

The bit I liked most was this :
"When working on your PC or any mains-powered equipment, always disconnect it completely from the mains wall socket."
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September 2, 2013 5:22:38 AM

We can go on and on forever. I know what I'm talking about. Everything I said remains true. Believe what you want. I'm done.
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a c 95 V Motherboard
September 2, 2013 1:34:45 PM

knightmike said:
We can go on and on forever. I know what I'm talking about. Everything I said remains true. Believe what you want. I'm done.


Good .

The advice you gave is potentially deadly to a person building a computer . No one should work on a pc while it is plugged in unless they have a death wish .

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September 2, 2013 4:47:57 PM

Outlander_04 said:
knightmike said:
We can go on and on forever. I know what I'm talking about. Everything I said remains true. Believe what you want. I'm done.


Good .

The advice you gave is potentially deadly to a person building a computer . No one should work on a pc while it is plugged in unless they have a death wish .



I can't even begin to understand why ANYONE would think of keeping a PC or any electronic device plugged in and work on its components. Even when I put Ram or a new hard drive in, I've always unplugged it. It's Electricity 101!! Often for some things like VCRs I've let sit for 24 hours before touching. I'm not trying to get any kind of electrical shock.

It's wonder the 10 years electrician has lived this long.

The rollercoaster idea was amusing, this suggestion to keep the thing plugged in is dangerous.

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a b V Motherboard
September 3, 2013 12:44:27 AM

PA Systems said:
Outlander_04 said:
11466445,0,209527 said:
We can go on and on forever. I know what I'm talking about. Everything I said remains true. Believe what you want. I'm done.
said:


Good .

The advice you gave is potentially deadly to a person building a computer . No one should work on a pc while it is plugged in unless they have a death wish .

said:


I can't even begin to understand why ANYONE would think of keeping a PC or any electronic device plugged in and work on its components. Even when I put Ram or a new hard drive in, I've always unplugged it. It's Electricity 101!!

agree, and it isn't the first time I read this....................... utterly stupid.
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September 3, 2013 4:27:03 AM

This arguement is all well and good for establishing certain principles but I'd still like to know if I should attach the wrist strap to the PC case (unpowered, of course) while working on the motherboard on that cabinet?
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September 3, 2013 5:50:03 AM

You might want to look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antistatic_wrist_strap

Attaching the wrist strap to a case that isn't grounded isn't going to ground you. Electricity 101. Since everybody here is dead set against installing the PSU, making sure the power switch on the PSU is in the OFF position and plugging it in, I can only assume they are grounding themselves to building rebar, a cold-water pipe, or a ground rod. Either that or they're not grounding themselves at all. Which is fine. You can just say the part was DOA when you return it.
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a c 95 V Motherboard
September 3, 2013 1:20:56 PM

knightmike said:
You might want to look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antistatic_wrist_strap

Attaching the wrist strap to a case that isn't grounded isn't going to ground you. Electricity 101. Since everybody here is dead set against installing the PSU, making sure the power switch on the PSU is in the OFF position and plugging it in, I can only assume they are grounding themselves to building rebar, a cold-water pipe, or a ground rod. Either that or they're not grounding themselves at all. Which is fine. You can just say the part was DOA when you return it.


Why do people who say they wont post again always post again?

Anyway you still have misunderstood the issue of static electricity . It wont matter at all if you and the case both have very high potentials . So long as you have the same potential .
Wearing cotton clothing , working on a wooden table top and touching the case immediately before you handle a part is all that is needed . A wrist strap works for forgetful people , and yes you should take one of those two precautions before handling components even after they are in the case



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September 3, 2013 3:56:25 PM

I never said I wouldn't post again. I said I was done arguing with you because you refuse to face facts. So I'll just use sarcasm.

Oh I get it. So if I have 3 volts and the case has 5 volts, touching it will equalize our potential. So now we both have 4 volts. Now it's safe to touch that piece of sensitive electronic equipment that has 0 volts. No ESD risk there. No, sir.
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