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ASUS Lemon Laptop caused loss of Windows License

Last response: in Windows 7
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September 2, 2013 3:57:56 PM

I had an Asus G73-JH laptop with Windows 7, bought from Best Buy a few years back. I purchased all the fancy protection packages (call it naïvette) to hopefully future-proof the expensive gaming laptop.

A few years down the road (now a year ago), the laptop kept experiencing random BSOD's and freezings. Long story short, after having the laptop sent in way too many times than their "No Lemon Policy" allowed, I finally was setup with a credit towards the purchase of a new laptop. After purchasing the equivalent of what I had before (a G75-VW), I went on my happy way. The new laptop came pre-installed with a copy of Windows 8, which I did my best to give a try. I couldn't stand it, so I popped in my old hard drive, deleted the old drivers (went from an ATI radeon to an NVIDIA GTX gpu), and everything seemed to be running perfectly.

Now comes the Windows Activation Technologies popup! YAY!

I 100% understand that my copy of Windows 7 was OEM and therefore 'locked-in' to the previous laptop's motherboard, and this current laptop's motherboard is too dissimilar to be passable for the WAT settings.

My question is not how to 'hack' or 'crack' my copy of Windows. My question is, without reformatting my computer and doing a re-install, is there any way to either contact Asus or Microsoft and ask for help in stopping this popup? Is this popup anything more than a warning? (I do have the watermark on my desktop saying it is no longer a Genuine copy). If I keep clicking 'cancel' when it asks me to solve the issue, will it eventually give me limited access to windows or some such thing (like the trials of Microsoft Office do after they expire?).

I've never had a 'fake' version of Windows or anything, so I'm a little on-edge about this whole situation. As far as I'm concerned, I'm running a 100% genuine copy of windows because I purchased it within a lemon computer, and the time that it took for them to get me a new one was too great, so the computer became out-of-date and I had to purchase a newer version.

Thanks~

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September 2, 2013 4:08:35 PM
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In short No. to elaborate, NOooooooo.

there are a few problems with what you are doing. first is it's against Microsoft's Terms and becomes software piracy. Secondly even if it was a retail version of the OS I would Highly recommend to reinstall windows.

You have shutdown windows with one set of hardware, transplanted it into a new body (new laptop) and just asked it to deal with it. its never going to be happy and will experience problems.

You have windows 8 licenses on the new laptop. If this is Windows 8 Pro then you have included downgrade rights to go to windows 7 Pro of Vista Pro
if it's not pro then I'd advise purchase the upgrade from win 8 to win 8 pro. then exercise your legal downgrade right. when and if the time comes to go back to win 8 then the license is still there for use.

In short using your old hard drive in the new laptop you are NOT using a legal copy of windows.
September 2, 2013 4:13:10 PM

HugoStiglitz said:
In short No. to elaborate, NOooooooo.

there are a few problems with what you are doing. first is it's against Microsoft's Terms and becomes software piracy. Secondly even if it was a retail version of the OS I would Highly recommend to reinstall windows.

You have shutdown windows with one set of hardware, transplanted it into a new body (new laptop) and just asked it to deal with it. its never going to be happy and will experience problems.

You have windows 8 licenses on the new laptop. If this is Windows 8 Pro then you have included downgrade rights to go to windows 7 Pro of Vista Pro
if it's not pro then I'd advise purchase the upgrade from win 8 to win 8 pro. then exercise your legal downgrade right. when and if the time comes to go back to win 8 then the license is still there for use.

In short using your old hard drive in the new laptop you are NOT using a legal copy of windows.


Thanks for the elaborate answer. I won't pick a solution just yet as I wish to see what others have to say (Though I expect mostly the same information.)

I understand, from the legal and technical aspects exactly what you're saying. Though as a consumer I do feel cheated that, because I was given a hardware lemon and Geek Squad decided to ditz around with it for so long that I could no longer purchase the exact same laptop, that I'm now on my own.

The main reason for sticking with using my old hard drive in the new laptop is because, while files themselves (pictures, documents, etc) are easily transferable, programs are not. I have programs in here that I no longer have the registration keys for (Acronis TrueImage Home being one of them. The box disappeared and I can't find it) and I'd rather not go out and spend money on purchasing new keys for programs I already own.

But yeah, I honestly wasn't expecting to get anywhere. I figured I'd throw the question out there just to see if maybe I was overlooking something.
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