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Ethernet beyound specifications

Last response: in Networking
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September 4, 2013 1:02:04 AM

Hello network specialists,

I'm quite a newbie in working out of specification. My purpose is to establish a connection for about 200-230m via copper. Since I'm need to send only some view KByte per sec and the setup which will be for a permanent installation allowing me to use Cat 7 installation cable I was thinking in stuck to a copper solution while reducing the link speed to 10MBit full-duplex.

I did some tests, using different long distance cables like Cat 6 AWG 24 Patch Cable and Cat 7 AWG 23 installation cable. What I realized is, that's not only a matter of cable quality but the quality of hardware (NIC's & switches) as well.

For example, establishing a direct connection ( 2 x 100m Cat 6 AWG 24 Patch Cable + 1 BTW Cat 6 coupler ) between two Intel network server adapter works quite well, while as soon as I connect at both ends HP switches (procurve 2910al or 1810-8G v2) the connection is collapsing.
So my questions are:
- are there some differences known in signal conditioning (I guess that's the reason why my connection in collapsing) between different manufacturers?
- which components would you recommend, if I would take this risk (I need to have a switch at both ends)?
- which software would you recommend to test a permanent connection?
- did anybody some experiences with devices like "veracity" is providing

Thank you very much in advance
cheers
greg
September 4, 2013 1:13:40 AM

Ikarus79 said:
Hello network specialists,

I'm quite a newbie in working out of specification. My purpose is to establish a connection for about 200-230m via copper. Since I'm need to send only some view KByte per sec and the setup which will be for a permanent installation allowing me to use Cat 7 installation cable I was thinking in stuck to a copper solution while reducing the link speed to 10MBit full-duplex.

I did some tests, using different long distance cables like Cat 6 AWG 24 Patch Cable and Cat 7 AWG 23 installation cable. What I realized is, that's not only a matter of cable quality but the quality of hardware (NIC's & switches) as well.

For example, establishing a direct connection ( 2 x 100m Cat 6 AWG 24 Patch Cable + 1 BTW Cat 6 coupler ) between two Intel network server adapter works quite well, while as soon as I connect at both ends HP switches (procurve 2910al or 1810-8G v2) the connection is collapsing.
So my questions are:
- are there some differences known in signal conditioning (I guess that's the reason why my connection in collapsing) between different manufacturers?
- which components would you recommend, if I would take this risk (I need to have a switch at both ends)?
- which software would you recommend to test a permanent connection?
- did anybody some experiences with devices like "veracity" is providing

Thank you very much in advance
cheers
greg


Drop a switch in the middle where you have the coupler.
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September 4, 2013 1:20:17 AM

Pinhedd said:

Drop a switch in the middle where you have the coupler.


I would like, but I can't. The final solution has to be 200m at a stretch.
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September 4, 2013 1:37:50 AM

Ikarus79 said:
Pinhedd said:

Drop a switch in the middle where you have the coupler.


I would like, but I can't. The final solution has to be 200m at a stretch.


That's fine, you can use a POE switch in the middle and on the endpoints if power is an issue in the middle. However, all Ethernet signalling standards define 100m stretches as nominal. Anything higher may attenuate the signal too heavily. You may be able to exceed it by a small margin, but not an additional 100% to 130%. You need something in the middle to boost the signal strength, and that's what switches are good for.
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Best solution

September 4, 2013 3:01:45 AM

If you are running new cabling anyway why not just do it right and run fiber. It is not that much more costly and you likely could even run at 10g if you could afford the switches to connect to it.

The length restriction is built into how ethernet works and how the timing works. It is related to how long the signal takes to propagate in the cable. This would be like trying to increase the speed of light in optical cables.

You other solution is to not use ethernet. There are technology called long reach ethernet. I think it is actually using a form of DSL on the cabling. It is not something that is used because it is still cheaper to have fiber run and use optical interfaces in your switches. This used to be many thousands of dollars but is much cheaper now. To go really cheap you should be able to buy premade/terminated dual fiber patch cords. You could then run them in some cheap plactic tubing or if they are protected enough like in a ceiling you could try to run it bare.
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September 4, 2013 4:41:15 AM

Thank you Pinhedd & bill001g for your suggestions.

roughly estimated, fiber usually means 8 -10 times the price of copper. It's not only the fiber that is makes it more expensive, but usually you need special fiber dedicated hardware, like NIC's with corresponding plugs and special dedicated switches + SPF modules, ect.
Beside this solution I was thinking of using a CMTS for example as well, but the costs for such a hardware are still enormous.
An other idea was to go back to coax since my bandwidth is <5kB/s , but the components are pretty rare :( 
Also wireless could be a solution, but my environment doesn't allow me to do that.

I guess a POE Switch will do it as well.
Guys, does someone knows a ethernet-inline-POE-repeater-manufacturer aside, that one I mentioned in my fist post?

Thank you very much for your suggestion once again
cheers greg
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September 4, 2013 10:08:40 AM

Ikarus79 said:
Thank you Pinhedd & bill001g for your suggestions.

roughly estimated, fiber usually means 8 -10 times the price of copper. It's not only the fiber that is makes it more expensive, but usually you need special fiber dedicated hardware, like NIC's with corresponding plugs and special dedicated switches + SPF modules, ect.
Beside this solution I was thinking of using a CMTS for example as well, but the costs for such a hardware are still enormous.
An other idea was to go back to coax since my bandwidth is <5kB/s , but the components are pretty rare :( 
Also wireless could be a solution, but my environment doesn't allow me to do that.

I guess a POE Switch will do it as well.
Guys, does someone knows a ethernet-inline-POE-repeater-manufacturer aside, that one I mentioned in my fist post?

Thank you very much for your suggestion once again
cheers greg


D-Link has a ton of POE switches. You may be able to find some POE repeaters (just a switch with two ports) as well
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