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Performance Drop From Win7 to Win8 - help required!

Tags:
  • Gaming
  • Clean Install
  • Benchmark
  • Performance
  • Windows 8
  • Graphics
  • Asus
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 8
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September 5, 2013 12:55:32 AM

Hello,
I have recently clean installed Windows 8. Before that I had Windows 7 64 bit (upgraded from Winxp).
I have made no hardware changes. And zero software changes aside from the obvious windows 8:

Here are my specs:
Asus Sabertooth Z77
2X8GB G.Skill Ripjaw-X DDR3 1600Mhz
Crucial Solid Series 256GB CT256M4SSD2 SSD
Intel Core i5-3570K


I had my regular 3dmark11 steam-demo version, here are the results of all benchmarks on both systems:
Before: Windows 7: I overclocked my CPU to 4.2 ghz, 4.4 and 4.5 and got: 9280, 9350 and 9400 respectively.

After: Windows 8: With 4.5 Overclock: I got 9180.
THIS BENCHMARK RESULT IS SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER THAN MY LOWEST OVERCLOCK SETTINGS (4.2) BACK IN MY WINDOWS 7!

I haven't installed any new software. Nvidia drivers including experience is up to date. I have had Logitech gaming software and PrecisionX on both systems.
Back in Win7 I had MS Security Essentials disabled from the startup, and now with Win8 I disabled Real Time Protections of Windows Defender.

What can cause this drop? It's frustrating, I searched everywhere. This is the first time I am using Windows 8. Everyone else are telling me that Win8 have better performance than windows 7 (if only slightly) since 8 is lighter.

Please help guys, it is a gaming pc and highest performance possible is very important for me. Once I find the source of the performance-drop, we can test things. Maybe tweak win8 a bit, or defender, or something.

More about : performance drop win7 win8 required

Best solution

a b * Windows 8
a c 215 $ Windows 7
September 5, 2013 1:10:29 AM

Install some games and get actual framerates first. If it's still playable under Windows 8 (and there is no reason why it shouldn't be if your drivers are up to date), then I wouldn't worry about these 3dmark results. If you are having framerate issues under 8 with more than one game, post back.

Also, knowing your video card model would be handy.
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September 5, 2013 2:34:11 AM

Oops.. Is there a good way to get all your specs - detailed - so I can just copy-paste from a list into the forums, instead of writing each by hand? (like when people put all their rig for their signature?)
My GPU is: Asus NVidia GeForce 670 GTX DC2T.

I tried Batrman AC's Benchmark, and compared to my last results: the result was also lower than it was on my last install.

The performance drop is very significant for me, since this new win8 is a total clean install, not a day old. With minimum softwares and zero apps. barely any games etc. No reason to get lower framerates and benchmarking scores. Especially since after close research, everyone testified for improvement and/or similar performance when moving to Win8, non claimed performance is lower.

I don't even know if I am going to stay on 4.5 as I haven't tested it for long, I might go down to 4.2, making the drop even bigger.

If there are good tweaks for Win8 or ways to make Defender or other stuff take less performance, please tell me.
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September 5, 2013 3:52:08 AM

Another note: I installed two extra drivers, chipset and firmware:
Intel Chipset Driver V9.3.0.1021 for Windows XP 32bit & XP 64bit & Win7 32bit & Win7 64bit & Win8 32bit & Win8 64bit.(WHQL)

Intel Management Engine Firmware upgrade program
For better Windows® 8 compatibility, this tool will update the Intel® Management Engine(ME) firmware to 8.1.

Not sure if either can negatively affect performance, I don't know how to remove/uninstall them.

Please help. If you are a gamer you will understand my condition.
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September 5, 2013 10:55:20 AM

Can anyone help, suggest anything?

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a b * Windows 8
a c 215 $ Windows 7
September 5, 2013 4:35:50 PM

I am a gamer, but I don't get worked up about switching operating systems and losing 20 FPS in a game when I had 120 FPS to begin with.

What I meant in my original post is play the games you normally do and see if you get playable frame rates, rather than running the built in benchmark tools. Understanding that everyone's definition of 'playable' will be different, see if they are playable to you. If they are, stop freaking out over the benchmark results and just play.

I used to be exactly like you. Wanting to squeeze every ounce of performance out of my rig, endlessly fiddling and tweaking to achieve that goal. Then I realized what an utter waste of time and money it was.

To answer your questions above though, the chipset driver and the management engine firmware update tool should not affect gaming performance. If you're really serious about tweaking Windows 8, you can try using Black Viper's Windows 8 service configurations here:

http://www.blackviper.com/service-configurations/black-...

Remember to make a note of everything you changed though. It's very easy to make changes to services, forget what you changed, and then realize something else on your system doesn't work properly. You will save yourself HOURS of toubleshooting time and effort if something does break.
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September 6, 2013 3:17:54 AM

The_Prophecy said:
I am a gamer, but I don't get worked up about switching operating systems and losing 20 FPS in a game when I had 120 FPS to begin with.

What I meant in my original post is play the games you normally do and see if you get playable frame rates, rather than running the built in benchmark tools. Understanding that everyone's definition of 'playable' will be different, see if they are playable to you. If they are, stop freaking out over the benchmark results and just play.

I used to be exactly like you. Wanting to squeeze every ounce of performance out of my rig, endlessly fiddling and tweaking to achieve that goal. Then I realized what an utter waste of time and money it was.

To answer your questions above though, the chipset driver and the management engine firmware update tool should not affect gaming performance. If you're really serious about tweaking Windows 8, you can try using Black Viper's Windows 8 service configurations here:

http://www.blackviper.com/service-configurations/black-...

Remember to make a note of everything you changed though. It's very easy to make changes to services, forget what you changed, and then realize something else on your system doesn't work properly. You will save yourself HOURS of toubleshooting time and effort if something does break.


I understand, I just don't why there's a drop to begin with, especially if everything is cleanly installed.
I have made some tweaks supposedly to optimize SSD performance, endurance and capacity, from this guide:
http://www.thessdreview.com/ssd-guides/optimization-gui...
including: disabling Windows SuperFetch and Prefetch, Disabling Windows Search Service, Disabling Pagefile (reducing it to 0), disabling hibernation, some boot tweaks, disabling drive indexing (right click on the drive > properties and uncheck the lowest box), setting system to Performance in power options.
I have kept 4% of system protection on however. and Haven't messed with the CPU features like he advised.
What do you think? anything here can be un-safe or dangerous/ performance hitting in the long term?

Another huge issue I have is with Logitech G510 + Logitech G500 mouse and keyboard and the Gaming Software: Windows always takes more time to recognize the hardware first -emitting a *bing* sound - then after a long while (10-15 secs), although everything else is up and running half a minute ago, I hear another *bing* - sound that suggest another new hardware has been detected - and only THEN does the keyboard-lcd screen turns activated, profile softwares start running, and other ups like PercisionX load themselves into the G510 LCD.

Why is this happening? Is Windows 8 having trouble recognizing new software and memorizing them? Sometimes he *loses* them, and the lcd screen goes blank as if the keyboard has been forgotten... (It is also not listed as USB3 for some reason).

When Windows loses the keyboard, I can still use it, but the software becomes 100% un-runnable, and the system slows to a crawling speed, to a degree I type a letter and it takes 3 seconds to appear...
This is a huge compitablity issue, I cannot find a way to solve.

Moderator edit: A previous message was quoted multiple times. Removed duplicates to save space.
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a b * Windows 8
a c 215 $ Windows 7
September 6, 2013 2:42:39 PM

The Logitech G510 and G500 are not USB 3.0 capable devices, and will not show up as such under any circumstances.

Plugging a keyboard or mouse into a USB 3 port is a waste anyway, as keyboards and mice don't even come close to saturating the bandwidth available on even a USB 2.0 port. Plug your G510 and 500 into a USB 2.0 port and you should stop having detection issues. If the USB 3 controller drivers are being loaded after Windows 8 boots (or if there is a bug in the controller's firmware), you could get delays with the OS being able to recognize the devices attached to them.

Move your G510 and G500 to a USB 2.0 port instead and see what happens when you reboot.

With regards to the SSDReviews guide, the link appears to be dead. From what you mentioned you did above though, I can say that most of those are good ideas, unless you need to use the features they support or enable. I tend to discourage users from disabling Superfetch, as it does have tangible benefits to bootup time and loading applications. Disabling the paging file is also not a great idea, as it is needed for creating memory dumps if the system blue screens. Since you have already said that you have an active overclock, your chances of encountering one are increased. That said, it's also a bad idea to store the paging file on any kind of solid state storage. If you have a standard hard drive available in your system, enable the paging file and put it there instead (you can definitely keep it small if you want to).

Disabling drive indexing and the Windows Search Service are a good idea, but keep in mind that if you ever go looking for a random file and cannot recall it's location, running searches for that file will take significantly longer to complete.

Finally, I am curious as to what you meant by "some boot tweaks". Can you elaborate on that a bit more?
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September 7, 2013 3:33:58 AM

The_Prophecy said:
The Logitech G510 and G500 are not USB 3.0 capable devices, and will not show up as such under any circumstances.

Plugging a keyboard or mouse into a USB 3 port is a waste anyway, as keyboards and mice don't even come close to saturating the bandwidth available on even a USB 2.0 port. Plug your G510 and 500 into a USB 2.0 port and you should stop having detection issues. If the USB 3 controller drivers are being loaded after Windows 8 boots (or if there is a bug in the controller's firmware), you could get delays with the OS being able to recognize the devices attached to them.

Move your G510 and G500 to a USB 2.0 port instead and see what happens when you reboot.

With regards to the SSDReviews guide, the link appears to be dead. From what you mentioned you did above though, I can say that most of those are good ideas, unless you need to use the features they support or enable. I tend to discourage users from disabling Superfetch, as it does have tangible benefits to bootup time and loading applications. Disabling the paging file is also not a great idea, as it is needed for creating memory dumps if the system blue screens. Since you have already said that you have an active overclock, your chances of encountering one are increased. That said, it's also a bad idea to store the paging file on any kind of solid state storage. If you have a standard hard drive available in your system, enable the paging file and put it there instead (you can definitely keep it small if you want to).

Disabling drive indexing and the Windows Search Service are a good idea, but keep in mind that if you ever go looking for a random file and cannot recall it's location, running searches for that file will take significantly longer to complete.

Finally, I am curious as to what you meant by "some boot tweaks". Can you elaborate on that a bit more?


The_Prophecy said:
The Logitech G510 and G500 are not USB 3.0 capable devices, and will not show up as such under any circumstances.

Plugging a keyboard or mouse into a USB 3 port is a waste anyway, as keyboards and mice don't even come close to saturating the bandwidth available on even a USB 2.0 port. Plug your G510 and 500 into a USB 2.0 port and you should stop having detection issues. If the USB 3 controller drivers are being loaded after Windows 8 boots (or if there is a bug in the controller's firmware), you could get delays with the OS being able to recognize the devices attached to them.

Move your G510 and G500 to a USB 2.0 port instead and see what happens when you reboot.

With regards to the SSDReviews guide, the link appears to be dead. From what you mentioned you did above though, I can say that most of those are good ideas, unless you need to use the features they support or enable. I tend to discourage users from disabling Superfetch, as it does have tangible benefits to bootup time and loading applications. Disabling the paging file is also not a great idea, as it is needed for creating memory dumps if the system blue screens. Since you have already said that you have an active overclock, your chances of encountering one are increased. That said, it's also a bad idea to store the paging file on any kind of solid state storage. If you have a standard hard drive available in your system, enable the paging file and put it there instead (you can definitely keep it small if you want to).

Disabling drive indexing and the Windows Search Service are a good idea, but keep in mind that if you ever go looking for a random file and cannot recall it's location, running searches for that file will take significantly longer to complete.

Finally, I am curious as to what you meant by "some boot tweaks". Can you elaborate on that a bit more?


http://www.thessdreview.com/ssd-guides/optimization-gui...
Here, I re-posted the link for you to read. It should work.

I tried connecting both mouse and keyboard to USB 2.0 ports, the issue persists. I think it has something to do with Logitech Gaming Software and/or 2 strange "devices" that are tied to the mouse and keyboard: HID-Keyboard Device and HID-Compliant Mouse - which when removed from Device Manger, also remove: Logitech Gaming Virtual Mouse and Logitech Gaming Virtual Keyboard. So I assume that the source of the issue is those two extra appearing devices - the virtual mouse and keyboard, that disconnect on start-up, then after 10-15 seconds reconnect- when the Logitech software starts running and it is visible as the Keyboard-LCD start loading up. I also took a quick look on start-up, and I saw that that 2 devices appear out of no-where, in the "devices" lists. every boot.
I Never had that issue with Windows 7 - and I had it for a while, using the exact same software. I tried installing the latest, and older Logitech gaming software, didn't help. I think that only uninstalling the software helps, but of course I want to utilize it.

About the tweaks, I should mention that I have ONLY an SSD drive (Crucial M4 256 gb), no Hard-drive connected, and no multiple ssd's. I keep seeing that everyone are recommending disabling superfetch and prefetch (Which includes stopping the SuperFetch service and then going to RegEdit, finding the root where they are found, and modifying Prefetch and SuperFetch to 0, instead of 3). you really think it is bad for your system? or for some loadup/boot? and do you mean I should turn on Prefetch as well? (from regedit).

I can turn Pagefile back on, I really don't mind, but should I use the recommended ? (5 gb +/-) or less? But again, my entire system is running on a single SSD....

The Drive indexing - I disabled by searching "computer" then clicking on my computer, rightclicking on the drive, and un-checking the "allow files on the drive to have content indexed...." - I then clicked "on the drive, folders, and sub folders..." - it gave me a few "unable to perform" errors on some system files, I pressed skip all, and there finally a long loading - until it was finished. I hope I made it right?!...

Boot tweaks: are going to MSconfig, and removing BootGUI - But I eventually, brought it back on, since it didn't change much, and I prefer having feedback. Also going to "start-up and recovery" and un-checking "time to display list of perating systems" - but that is insignificant. Additionally, I used CMD>netplwiz to access User Accounts, and remove the need to type a password on start-up (I am using a Microsoft account).

Finally, I am still very disappointed by the performance drop I am experiencing! this make no sense. Because I had so many issues with drivers and stuff, I decided to perform a clean install of win8 again, since I didn't have much on anyhow. So for start, I tried using "remove everything and re-install windows" - but that took forever, and some issues persisted, so I just boot from win8-cd, deleted partitions and perform a hard clean install of Windows 8.
Now my benchmarking in 3dmark is showing even lower results!! 9050 instead of the stable 9350-9400 I had constantly with Win7. This is frustrating, since everyone else are reporting performance gain with win8, and since it is a freaking-clean install!
Could this be because of all the new sync, live tiles, Microsoft account and all the other online features? (I have real-time protection turn-off)
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