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Noob needs help with overclocking an i5 3750k to 4.5ghz.

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September 5, 2013 5:35:28 PM

Hey guys,

I'm a complete noob when it comes to overclocking. I want/plan to overclock my i5 3750k to 4.5ghz(atleast 4.0ghz) on my ASUS Maximus V Formula, this will be my first time overclocking so i'm a little scared, i need some help, advice or some encouragement lol.

I've been looking at this guide, here's the link:
http://rog.asus.com/184142012/maximus-motherboards/guid...

I know this guide is for the Maximus V Gene but would this work with the Maximus V Formula?

My main PC Specs are:
Maximus V Formula
i5 3750k CPU
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO CPU FAN
ASUS GTX 670 DirectCU II 4gb
Kingston HyperX Predator 8gb Kit(2x4) 2400mhz
Antec HCG 620W Modular
Cooler Master Storm Trooper Case(only stock fans)

Would the fans I have be able to cool my system efficiently if it was overclocked? or stock?

Would my PSU be able to handle everything on stock? or when CPU overclocked to 4.5ghz?

Any advice, help or encouragement would be very much appreciated, thanks guys :) 


September 5, 2013 5:51:30 PM

Stock fans are fine, you can get better, or add more.

Power supply can handle the hardware stock/overclocked.

Hyper EVO 212 won't really be good for 4.5ghz on the 3570k. Get one of the following: h80i/h100i/Noctua NH-d14.

All you need to do is set the multiplier to x45 and change the vcore to the lowest stable voltage for the 3570k.

If you're using a single 1080p monitor you do not need a 4GB card, get a 2GB 670 or 760/770.
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September 5, 2013 6:44:38 PM

edogawa said:
Stock fans are fine, you can get better, or add more.

Power supply can handle the hardware stock/overclocked.

Hyper EVO 212 won't really be good for 4.5ghz on the 3570k. Get one of the following: h80i/h100i/Noctua NH-d14.

All you need to do is set the multiplier to x45 and change the vcore to the lowest stable voltage for the 3570k.

If you're using a single 1080p monitor you do not need a 4GB card, get a 2GB 670 or 760/770.


Actually, the EVO does just fine. For better results, Noctua NH D14 or Thermalright Silverarrow or the above water cooling. I have my 3570K @ 4.7GHz 1.25vcore using the EVO 212. Temps are around 70°C under full load and the cooler works perfectly.

Have you built this or plan on building this? If you have not bought it yet, edogawa is right in that a 4GB card is not needed for 1080p. 2GB will be just fine.
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September 5, 2013 7:57:38 PM

Well, technically it would work, but 70C is in the unacceptable range for me on a processor.
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September 5, 2013 8:03:10 PM

edogawa said:
Well, technically it would work, but 70C is in the unacceptable range for me on a processor.


If you like to have a decent gap before hitting unsafe levels then okay. That is totally understandable. :)  But this is under full load. Gaming, it doesn't go over 65°C.
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September 5, 2013 8:14:58 PM

True that, games don't tend to max out the processor at all these days.
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September 5, 2013 8:27:46 PM

Ignoring the hardware side for now, overclocking can be a slow process. You have to be patient with your components as they will never match anyone else settings and perform exactly the same. Eventually you will become familiar with the settings your CPU will and won't like and should be able to get the best from it. To begin with, raise things slowly. Maybe stating with x42 multiplier and auto voltage to see what the mobo suggests. Check temps, stability and then push on higher if you can. Once you hit your preferred limit or well over do it, (I suggest 80°C as a max temp for 3570K), see if you can reduce your voltage manually, while still maintaining stability to help reduce the temps. There are many other features you might want to try, but careful not to stray too far. Most of your settings can be left on automatic. I suggest you research what each setting does to get a good idea of how it can help or hinder your CPU performance as you adjust it. If want to look at other peoples results, they can give you an idea of what to expect, but probably won't match your results. If something is not working, don't try to force it.

Other things to look out for are voltage walls and unnoticeable stability issues. Voltage walls are essentially large increases in voltage to reach the next multiplier. eg, my CPU needs ~1.25V for 4.7GHz (x47 multiplier), but 1.35V for 4.8GHz (x48 multiplier). That +0.1V is quite a lot and causes lots of heat too. Voltage walls often block stability, but can also stop you from loading windows altogether.

Unnoticeable stability issues. This is far more common with RAM overclocking, but still applies to CPU as well. Basically what can happen is a CPU may seem stable overclocked initially, but does not have the performance boost expected to match the OC. This is a sign of to little voltage, meaning it is just enough to keep running but not enough to be 100% accurate and needs to correct itself more often. When this happens with desktop RAM, the errors aren't corrected and thus causes system failures, BSOD etc. This does not usually happen with CPUs though.

Hope this info helps.
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September 5, 2013 8:30:11 PM

edogawa said:
True that, games don't tend to max out the processor at all these days.


Yes. Better safe than sorry, though right? I might drop down to 4.5GHz. The performance difference shouldn't be much.
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September 5, 2013 10:24:32 PM

Thanks a lot for the info guys :)  but yes I have everything bought already, just need to build it this weekend.

I bought the gtx 670 because it was on special at where I bought it & the standard 2gb one was $20 more then the 4gb, won't make much difference I know but $20 less for 2 extra gigs, why not? Lol

I might exchange the CPU fan(brand new unopened) 70 degrees sounds a little too hot for my liking even though the CPU probably can handle it, but the hotter it is, the less life span right? Any suggestions for a good CPU fan? The best bang for buck?

&again, thanks a lot guys :)  (y)
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September 5, 2013 10:44:53 PM

EVO is best bang for the buck and 70 under full load isn't bad at all
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September 5, 2013 11:13:25 PM

Mickey Shen said:
Thanks a lot for the info guys :)  but yes I have everything bought already, just need to build it this weekend.

I bought the gtx 670 because it was on special at where I bought it & the standard 2gb one was $20 more then the 4gb, won't make much difference I know but $20 less for 2 extra gigs, why not? Lol

I might exchange the CPU fan(brand new unopened) 70 degrees sounds a little too hot for my liking even though the CPU probably can handle it, but the hotter it is, the less life span right? Any suggestions for a good CPU fan? The best bang for buck?

&again, thanks a lot guys :)  (y)



The hyper 212 Evo is a very good heat sink, especially for the price, so keep it since you already bought it.

70 degrees Celsius is safe technically so it's not a huge deal. If you're lucky you will get a chip that can hit 4.5ghz at a low voltage, but like mentioned above watch out for those clock speeds that will require a huge voltage increase. If you have issues with overclocking you know where to come too.

Also, take your time and don't rush when your assembling your new computer. :p  Good Luck!
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September 8, 2013 2:53:58 PM

Mickey Shen said:
Thanks a lot for the info guys :)  but yes I have everything bought already, just need to build it this weekend.

I bought the gtx 670 because it was on special at where I bought it & the standard 2gb one was $20 more then the 4gb, won't make much difference I know but $20 less for 2 extra gigs, why not? Lol

I might exchange the CPU fan(brand new unopened) 70 degrees sounds a little too hot for my liking even though the CPU probably can handle it, but the hotter it is, the less life span right? Any suggestions for a good CPU fan? The best bang for buck?

&again, thanks a lot guys :)  (y)


Tradesman1 said:
EVO is best bang for the buck and 70 under full load isn't bad at all


Agreed. Also, CPUs are durable. I had a PC with and old P4 (can't remember model, but it was single core, hyperthreaded, 3GHz) hot as hell always running about 70°C with an aftermarket cooler. It lasted 8 years (and would still be running today if it wasn't for a glass of water and a small child.) CPU's are usually quite durable, but I understand if you want to kepp it under 70.
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September 8, 2013 7:37:54 PM

Agree with PJCat, know there's quite a few Q6600s (one of the best CPUs ever) out there still running from 2007 at 3.6 - 4+ 24/7
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September 15, 2013 1:17:41 AM

Hey guys, sorry for the lag reply but...

I have tried overclocking & these were the settings i used:
-Reset everything to default
-Set Ai Overclock Tuner to Manual
-Set all core ratio limits to 45(tried 42 & 40 as well)
-Set CPU Manual Voltage to 1.250v
-Set CPU Load-line Calibration to Extreme

After save & reset, my system slows down to a snail, after 45 core ratio i tried 42 & 40, leaving the voltage the same, & still same, slow piece of s*** system. Shouldn't it run more smoother when lowering the core ratio from 45 to 40 but leaving the volts at 1.250? or did i get what they call a piece of s*** chip compared to some people who were lucky & recieved a "mint chip"?

After failing, i went into bios & went back to defaults... system still slow, wtf is going on?
-__-

I need some serious help right now, if not i'm going to headbutt the wall soon :@ lol

I've also tried what you guys suggested by starting out slow & leaving everything on default/auto, i tried with 4.0 with everything else on default, still the same
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