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Newer PC Builder - Intel Core i7: 4770k vs. 4771

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September 7, 2013 4:41:25 PM

Hi Guys!

The title says it all! I'm relatively new to building PC's and have never OC'ed before. I'm torn between the higher clock speed of the 4771 and the overclock ability of the 4770k. I'm new at this and a little scared by the risks of overclocking. Also, I'd like to know, will the system automatically shut down if a CPU is pushed too far? The motherboard I'm looking at is the ASUS Maximus VI Hero ATX. I'm using this system to game, capture gameplay, video edit (in HD), light programming, and school work from highest to lowest priority.

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a b à CPUs
September 7, 2013 4:47:00 PM

The non-K series are what Intel calls "Partially Unlocked" since Sandy Bridge. You get 4 bins (1 bin is 100 Mhz, or whatever the base BCLK is set to, in this case) on top of the max turbo clock. So the max you will be able to do with the 4771 is 3.9 Ghz (max turbo) + 400 Mhz (partially unlocked multipliers) = 4.3 Ghz max. With a small bit of BCLK adjustment, you can get 4.4 Ghz (most likely stable).

If you are bent on OC'ing more than 4.3 - 4.4 Ghz, you have no choice but to get a K-model (and a good cooler). Otherwise, you can get away with a 4771 just fine. However, the price difference is nearly nil between the two models, and they both Turbo to 3.9 Ghz, so there really isn't much of a difference. If your priorities with a computer is as you listed, you won't miss any of the pro features on the non-K models (that's right, the K models lack certain features like Trusted Execution). If the price is nearly identical (within 20 bucks in my opinion), go for a K model would be my suggestion.

Most motherboards offer some form of "Turbo Enhancement" where all the cores are working at the max Turbo speed, not just 1 or 2. So you can usually count on the 4.3 Ghz as your all core max speed.

As for system limits, usually you get plenty of warning signs before something goes seriously wrong, such as crashes, and unusually high temperatures (on the CPU or the VRM on the motherboard). You can always establish a good baseline by reading a review or two on your preferred motherboard, to see what the reviewers have said about the OC capability of that board. Most of these boards also come with a tuning utility (in the BIOS/UEFI or in windows) that allows you to essentially push a button/click once to automatically overclock, which is great for beginners. That option is very safe and usually takes you to with in 15% of the max your CPU+Board+Heatsink/Fan solution is able to do, and that's typically enough, unless you plan on beating records.
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a c 147 à CPUs
September 7, 2013 4:50:06 PM

Both those processors are clocked exactly the same: 3.5 normal and 3.9 turbo.

Yes there are safeguards in place to prevent you pushing the cpu too hard but you still run the risk of burning out the cpu before these could kick in should you really have messed up. Following a guide is highly recommended and will keep you on the safe side of overclocking.
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September 7, 2013 5:08:08 PM

Maxx_Power said:
The non-K series are what Intel calls "Partially Unlocked" since Sandy Bridge. You get 4 bins (1 bin is 100 Mhz, or whatever the base BCLK is set to, in this case) on top of the max turbo clock. So the max you will be able to do with the 4771 is 3.9 Ghz (max turbo) + 400 Mhz (partially unlocked multipliers) = 4.3 Ghz max. With a small bit of BCLK adjustment, you can get 4.4 Ghz (most likely stable).

If you are bent on OC'ing more than 4.3 - 4.4 Ghz, you have no choice but to get a K-model (and a good cooler). Otherwise, you can get away with a 4771 just fine. However, the price difference is nearly nil between the two models, and they both Turbo to 3.9 Ghz, so there really isn't much of a difference. If your priorities with a computer is as you listed, you won't miss any of the pro features on the non-K models (that's right, the K models lack certain features like Trusted Execution). If the price is nearly identical (within 20 bucks in my opinion), go for a K model would be my suggestion.

Most motherboards offer some form of "Turbo Enhancement" where all the cores are working at the max Turbo speed, not just 1 or 2. So you can usually count on the 4.3 Ghz as your all core max speed.

As for system limits, usually you get plenty of warning signs before something goes seriously wrong, such as crashes, and unusually high temperatures (on the CPU or the VRM on the motherboard). You can always establish a good baseline by reading a review or two on your preferred motherboard, to see what the reviewers have said about the OC capability of that board. Most of these boards also come with a tuning utility (in the BIOS/UEFI or in windows) that allows you to essentially push a button/click once to automatically overclock, which is great for beginners. That option is very safe and usually takes you to with in 15% of the max your CPU+Board+Heatsink/Fan solution is able to do, and that's typically enough, unless you plan on beating records.


Thanks for the very helpful and quick answer!

I know for a fact I won't be OC'ing farther than 4.5 Ghz, but if I did any OC'ing it would be around 4-4.5 ish. I guess it'd be nice to have the flexability with the 4770k to go past 4.3 ghz, though. I'd like my PC to last a good amount of time, though, would it be a good idea to wait till down the road (3-4 years later) to OC? Or will it be fine to OC to 4-4.5 with a cooler (which I need a recommendation for) and still get a good 8-10 years on it?

And as mentioned above, I need a good recommendation for a heatsink. I'd like it to be quiet, and not too expensive, but I don't think I'd like to get into water cooling. Maybe water cooling is the way to go, sure why not... Also, are there any good water coolers out their? I don't need like, a dual fan radiator, but good enough for the OC stated above.
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a b à CPUs
September 7, 2013 5:23:01 PM

Christopher Gonzalez said:
Maxx_Power said:
The non-K series are what Intel calls "Partially Unlocked" since Sandy Bridge. You get 4 bins (1 bin is 100 Mhz, or whatever the base BCLK is set to, in this case) on top of the max turbo clock. So the max you will be able to do with the 4771 is 3.9 Ghz (max turbo) + 400 Mhz (partially unlocked multipliers) = 4.3 Ghz max. With a small bit of BCLK adjustment, you can get 4.4 Ghz (most likely stable).

If you are bent on OC'ing more than 4.3 - 4.4 Ghz, you have no choice but to get a K-model (and a good cooler). Otherwise, you can get away with a 4771 just fine. However, the price difference is nearly nil between the two models, and they both Turbo to 3.9 Ghz, so there really isn't much of a difference. If your priorities with a computer is as you listed, you won't miss any of the pro features on the non-K models (that's right, the K models lack certain features like Trusted Execution). If the price is nearly identical (within 20 bucks in my opinion), go for a K model would be my suggestion.

Most motherboards offer some form of "Turbo Enhancement" where all the cores are working at the max Turbo speed, not just 1 or 2. So you can usually count on the 4.3 Ghz as your all core max speed.

As for system limits, usually you get plenty of warning signs before something goes seriously wrong, such as crashes, and unusually high temperatures (on the CPU or the VRM on the motherboard). You can always establish a good baseline by reading a review or two on your preferred motherboard, to see what the reviewers have said about the OC capability of that board. Most of these boards also come with a tuning utility (in the BIOS/UEFI or in windows) that allows you to essentially push a button/click once to automatically overclock, which is great for beginners. That option is very safe and usually takes you to with in 15% of the max your CPU+Board+Heatsink/Fan solution is able to do, and that's typically enough, unless you plan on beating records.


Thanks for the very helpful and quick answer!

I know for a fact I won't be OC'ing farther than 4.5 Ghz, but if I did any OC'ing it would be around 4-4.5 ish. I guess it'd be nice to have the flexability with the 4770k to go past 4.3 ghz, though. I'd like my PC to last a good amount of time, though, would it be a good idea to wait till down the road (3-4 years later) to OC? Or will it be fine to OC to 4-4.5 with a cooler (which I need a recommendation for) and still get a good 8-10 years on it?

And as mentioned above, I need a good recommendation for a heatsink. I'd like it to be quiet, and not too expensive, but I don't think I'd like to get into water cooling. Maybe water cooling is the way to go, sure why not... Also, are there any good water coolers out their? I don't need like, a dual fan radiator, but good enough for the OC stated above.


You are very welcome, first and foremost.

As for when you would like to OC, my thought is currently this: when you get the computer, you ought to OC right away to see if there are any issues with (typically the motherboard and heatsink) any of the parts that would prevent you from doing so. If you by chance, get a marginal part (that is just good enough to operate at the stock settings), you'll be kicking yourself down the road for not finding out about it and dealing with it earlier (during warranty and return periods). Nearly all OCing is sanctioned by manufacturers and vendors, so you should really find out how much of a room you have to play with when you get everything set up and running, right away. Stress on the components (such as with OCing) is really the only way to reveal defects and vulnerabilities, and in fact, this is usually done (on a sample basis) to ensure stability by the manufacturers (although they can't test every single one).

That said, make sure your system is STABLE under stock settings first, or else it will make your attempts to troubleshoot OC related issues a LOT harder. So my suggestion on this is, setup the computer, install the OS, set the BIOS/UEFI options to the optimal (RAM usually, and some CPU related stuff). Then do some stress testing (Memtest first, to make sure the memory is stable, then IntelBurnTest - linpack). If you can pass 10 passes on memory, and 100 passes on IntelBurnTest (on max stress, max memory usage), you can consider yourself very stable for your purposes, and take it from there when you want to overclock. Establish a margin of stability first, like what I said above (x-amount of passes of some stressful test, or x-hours/days).

As for a good heatsink, this depends a lot on what case you will eventually get/use. If your case is wide enough, you can practically use any good tower heatsink as you wish. Then you have a ton of good options (Thermalright, Noctua for example) depending on your taste of how much noise, style, function, value, etc. Do be aware that Haswell (and Ivy Bridge, for that matter) get very hot under even mild OC (or even stock speeds, for that matter). So don't freak out when you see 70-90 degrees Celsius on the cores under load. Again, be sure to read a few reviews of Haswell CPUs to get an idea of what kind of temperatures you can expect (with whatever heatsink they used).

You can look up some heatsink rankings at Frostytech http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm. I prefer the air-cooled Thermalright or Noctua dual fan tower heatsinks. If you want to try water, try a Swiftech H220 (might be hard to find in the U.S. right now).
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September 8, 2013 10:18:04 AM

Maxx_Power said:
Christopher Gonzalez said:
Maxx_Power said:
The non-K series are what Intel calls "Partially Unlocked" since Sandy Bridge. You get 4 bins (1 bin is 100 Mhz, or whatever the base BCLK is set to, in this case) on top of the max turbo clock. So the max you will be able to do with the 4771 is 3.9 Ghz (max turbo) + 400 Mhz (partially unlocked multipliers) = 4.3 Ghz max. With a small bit of BCLK adjustment, you can get 4.4 Ghz (most likely stable).

If you are bent on OC'ing more than 4.3 - 4.4 Ghz, you have no choice but to get a K-model (and a good cooler). Otherwise, you can get away with a 4771 just fine. However, the price difference is nearly nil between the two models, and they both Turbo to 3.9 Ghz, so there really isn't much of a difference. If your priorities with a computer is as you listed, you won't miss any of the pro features on the non-K models (that's right, the K models lack certain features like Trusted Execution). If the price is nearly identical (within 20 bucks in my opinion), go for a K model would be my suggestion.

Most motherboards offer some form of "Turbo Enhancement" where all the cores are working at the max Turbo speed, not just 1 or 2. So you can usually count on the 4.3 Ghz as your all core max speed.

As for system limits, usually you get plenty of warning signs before something goes seriously wrong, such as crashes, and unusually high temperatures (on the CPU or the VRM on the motherboard). You can always establish a good baseline by reading a review or two on your preferred motherboard, to see what the reviewers have said about the OC capability of that board. Most of these boards also come with a tuning utility (in the BIOS/UEFI or in windows) that allows you to essentially push a button/click once to automatically overclock, which is great for beginners. That option is very safe and usually takes you to with in 15% of the max your CPU+Board+Heatsink/Fan solution is able to do, and that's typically enough, unless you plan on beating records.


Thanks for the very helpful and quick answer!

I know for a fact I won't be OC'ing farther than 4.5 Ghz, but if I did any OC'ing it would be around 4-4.5 ish. I guess it'd be nice to have the flexability with the 4770k to go past 4.3 ghz, though. I'd like my PC to last a good amount of time, though, would it be a good idea to wait till down the road (3-4 years later) to OC? Or will it be fine to OC to 4-4.5 with a cooler (which I need a recommendation for) and still get a good 8-10 years on it?

And as mentioned above, I need a good recommendation for a heatsink. I'd like it to be quiet, and not too expensive, but I don't think I'd like to get into water cooling. Maybe water cooling is the way to go, sure why not... Also, are there any good water coolers out their? I don't need like, a dual fan radiator, but good enough for the OC stated above.


You are very welcome, first and foremost.

As for when you would like to OC, my thought is currently this: when you get the computer, you ought to OC right away to see if there are any issues with (typically the motherboard and heatsink) any of the parts that would prevent you from doing so. If you by chance, get a marginal part (that is just good enough to operate at the stock settings), you'll be kicking yourself down the road for not finding out about it and dealing with it earlier (during warranty and return periods). Nearly all OCing is sanctioned by manufacturers and vendors, so you should really find out how much of a room you have to play with when you get everything set up and running, right away. Stress on the components (such as with OCing) is really the only way to reveal defects and vulnerabilities, and in fact, this is usually done (on a sample basis) to ensure stability by the manufacturers (although they can't test every single one).

That said, make sure your system is STABLE under stock settings first, or else it will make your attempts to troubleshoot OC related issues a LOT harder. So my suggestion on this is, setup the computer, install the OS, set the BIOS/UEFI options to the optimal (RAM usually, and some CPU related stuff). Then do some stress testing (Memtest first, to make sure the memory is stable, then IntelBurnTest - linpack). If you can pass 10 passes on memory, and 100 passes on IntelBurnTest (on max stress, max memory usage), you can consider yourself very stable for your purposes, and take it from there when you want to overclock. Establish a margin of stability first, like what I said above (x-amount of passes of some stressful test, or x-hours/days).

As for a good heatsink, this depends a lot on what case you will eventually get/use. If your case is wide enough, you can practically use any good tower heatsink as you wish. Then you have a ton of good options (Thermalright, Noctua for example) depending on your taste of how much noise, style, function, value, etc. Do be aware that Haswell (and Ivy Bridge, for that matter) get very hot under even mild OC (or even stock speeds, for that matter). So don't freak out when you see 70-90 degrees Celsius on the cores under load. Again, be sure to read a few reviews of Haswell CPUs to get an idea of what kind of temperatures you can expect (with whatever heatsink they used).

You can look up some heatsink rankings at Frostytech http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm. I prefer the air-cooled Thermalright or Noctua dual fan tower heatsinks. If you want to try water, try a Swiftech H220 (might be hard to find in the U.S. right now).


That's a good point! I should make sure system is stable at stock frequency, overclock it to where I want it to ensure that that's working fine, and then bring it to stock and wait it out untill I'm ready to overclock later.

My case is this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I would be able to figure this out, but I've got no clue the interior dimensions.

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a b à CPUs
September 8, 2013 11:44:00 AM

Christopher Gonzalez said:

That's a good point! I should make sure system is stable at stock frequency, overclock it to where I want it to ensure that that's working fine, and then bring it to stock and wait it out untill I'm ready to overclock later.

My case is this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
I would be able to figure this out, but I've got no clue the interior dimensions.



Oh that's a huge case. I think you are going to be okay with just about any thing heatsink-wise. Be sure to get regular profile memory, as the tall profile memory (those with tall heatsinks) may interfere with some CPU heatsinks.
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