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Can someone explain in every way why building a pc is better than buying one.

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  • Systems
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September 8, 2013 8:14:07 AM

Ok i am pretty confident building a pc by following online tutorials but my parents who are paying for it think that it would be easy to mess up and loosing money.

Can you explain to my parents that it is not hard.

Il show this to them.

More about : explain building buying

September 8, 2013 8:19:57 AM

Because it's cheaper, and you get to choose exactly what you want, not being limited by other parts. And less chance by being fooled by merchants (oh, it's the last gen, and more powerful PC that you can buy and that kind of talk).
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Best solution

September 8, 2013 8:21:49 AM

There are 3 main reasons, which I believe most people around here will agree with me. These are also the reasons why I build my own PC:

1 - It's cheaper. Simply that. Imagine you were building a computer for someone else, if you were to just get the parts, assemble and sell them, you'd get absolutely no profit. So, companies that sell built computers charge an extra for the work of assembling and making sure everything works: something you can do yourself. And these profit margins sometimes get as high as 20% or even more! As an example, I checked on a prebuilt computer on a local shop, I could build the same for 760 euros while they were charging 930.

2 - It's the best you can get for your specific needs. Imagine you want a great computer for, let's say, gaming. What you'll be able to find already built is one hell of a machine. Maybe all you want is a great graphics, but if you're going for pre-built computers, maybe the only one with a great graphics also includes a load of other components you don't need. And unfortunately for you, those won't be free.

3 - You're not limited by what merchants offer. The offer on components is MUCH but MUCH bigger than the offer on pre-built computers. You're able to get the latest components and, over time, upgrade your computer accordingly. If in 2 years you think your graphics card isn't as good, you can get a 2nd one and activate SLI (for your parents, that means the cards work together and perform better). If you were to buy it on a regular store, you probably wouldn't be able to do that because the computer is built to run like it is, not to take into account any future upgrades.

Bonus - You can call it your baby!
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September 8, 2013 8:22:30 AM

And with tutorials, and the manuals, building a PC is just like building stuff with legos.
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September 8, 2013 8:23:58 AM

Kelthar said:


3 - You can call it your baby!



That's one of the best reasons to build instead of buying. :D 

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September 8, 2013 8:25:26 AM

SirDrannik said:
Kelthar said:


3 - You can call it your baby!



That's one of the best reasons to build instead of buying. :D 



I changed it to a bonus because I figured talking about components offer would be more important. But yeah, bragging rights for the win!
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September 8, 2013 8:26:47 AM

they don't always make profit, not on the hardware. sometimes they even lose money.............. they depend on the software money developers pay them to include things like anti virus software and any of the other tons of useless software that most of us usually delete when we get our "store bought" machines.
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September 8, 2013 8:29:16 AM

First, I'd like to +1 SirDrannik's comment - you get more PC for your money when you build it yourself.

The single downside to building your own is having to go through the individual manufacturers for warranty replacements as opposed to one vendor for any and all issues.

However, the warranties on quality individual parts are almost always better than what you get through a PC manufacturer (you'd have to buy an extended service plan to match in most cases). Not to mention, quality parts are less likely to fail anyway.

PC manufacturers generally skimp on one or more parts (e.g. Dell motherboards are more prone to failure, and nearly every mainstream manufacturer uses mediocre or sub-par PSU's - a huge no-no. A failing PSU has the potential to take out every component in your system.)

On top of that, you can upgrade a PC you built yourself without voiding any warranties. :) 
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September 8, 2013 8:32:45 AM

1. Far cheaper than an equivalent pre-built system. Because "gamers" are seen by companies as people with plenty of disposable incomes, so you get high markups on gaming items including rigs, and your also paying for assembly, shipment and profit margin of the rig and hardware on top of its base hardware cost. With building your own, your just paying for profit margin and shipment on the parts you buy.

2. Better optimized than the above pre-built, often "gaming" machines that you get off the shelf pair i7's and 16GB of RAM with some pathetic GPU like a GT640. Looks great to an uninformed person that has a vague knowledge formed in the 90's that "More RAM is more better" and that i7 sounds cooler than i5, but any person who knows what their talking about will know it will perform in games poorly because of the super budget GPU.

3. Because you will never find a good PSU inside an off the shelf machine unless your looking at more boutique options. That thing can kill the rest of the machine, you want a good one.

4. If you can put together Lego you can put together a computer. To put something in the wrong place you would physically have to break the connector. Follow guides and follow instructions, you cant go too wrong.
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September 8, 2013 8:34:26 AM

If you need a basic pc, then it is hard to compete with a pre built.
But, if you want a pc for gaming, then there are several advantages, and to my mind no disadvantages.
1. Price.
A pre built buys from the same source as you(excepting the really big ones like dell and hp) They must make a profit so they must charge enough for the assembly to make money.
2. Quality.
A pre built will select only the minimum quality parts that does the job.
3. Warranty.
A pre built will offer typically a 1 year warranty. If you need a repair, you must bear the cost of shipping to their repair center.
Most parts that you order will come with a manufacturer's warranty. Typically, that warranty is 3 years. If there is an initial component failure(yes, that does happen) good online vendors like Newegg have very good return policies.
4. Mess up opportunities.
Computer parts are very standard. They fit only one way. If you do not force them, it is hard to get into trouble.
A pre built will have compatible parts. But, if you post your proposed build on these forums, you will get confirmation of the compatibility of your proposed parts.
5. Future upgrades:
A pre build will come with a Power supply and cpu cooler that is only adequate for the ordered configuration. If you want to upgrade, such parts are useless and will need to be replaced.
6. Windows reinstall.
In the event that you contract a virus, and need to reinstall windows, a pre build will require you to order a reinstall dvd. Or, at least create one. If you build it yourself, you have the dvd and are free to reinstall.
7. Bloatware.
One way a pre built makes money is by including all sorts of trial programs and utilities called bloatware. If you know how, you can remove them since they clutter up your PC. Many of the programs are useless ad servers. Better to do a clean install.
8. Support.
The support you get from pre builts is spotty at best. Often from a overseas call center.
If you have a problem, these forums will give you good advice in a timely manner.
9. The learning experience.
I think this is perhaps the most important point. By building yourself, you will learn much.
Your parents should consider this as an opportunity to give you experience and confidence.
It is probably worth more than tuition.
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September 8, 2013 8:45:04 AM

Foxy2013 said:
Ok i am pretty confident building a pc by following online tutorials but my parents who are paying for it think that it would be easy to mess up and loosing money.

Can you explain to my parents that it is not hard.

Il show this to them.


Honestly, I'm a little torn on this one. I've built my own PCs for about 15 years now, and even when I first started it was surprisingly easy. (I imagine it'd be easier to build your first rig nowadays, what with youtube tutorials and more consistent hardware standards and better chassis designs and whatnot.)

That said, I was about 20 years old when I started. I wasn't living with my parents. I don't know how old you are, and although I have every confidence that (for example) a 15-year-old kid could build a PC, I'm not sure I'd be eager to pay for him to try. In principle, the task is pretty simple -- not much more difficult than assembling, say, a child's bicycle on Christmas Day. As long as you're careful, everything will fit together just fine.

But you might get a dud part, which would lead to your having to troubleshoot the problem, remove the part, send it back to the manufacturer, and wait for a replacement. Or worse, you might install something incorrectly, perhaps damaging the part in the process.

Then again, one of the perks of building your own is that you have fine-tune control over the components. You have individual warranties on all of them (in many cases, multi-year warranties); if you have a problem, chances are you'll get better service from the component manufacturer than you would from the Dells of the world. And it won't cost you anything to buy that warranty service.

Which brings us to the biggest perk of all: you will pay less, and get significantly more, if you build your own rig. You will have access to higher-quality (and thus, generally speaking, longer-lasting) components, even down to the power supply.

The downside, as before, is that you're on your own, but that's not really a disadvantage as long as you're competent. I can almost guarantee that a reasonably intelligent layman with access to google can troubleshoot computer problems better than the phone jockeys at a generic tech-support desk ("Is the computer plugged in?" Why yes, yes it is.)

The main hurdle is in the first month or so of the system's life. Any inherent flaws in your parts will tend to make themselves known fairly quickly. Once they've demonstrated that they work correctly, computer parts generally last a very long time given bare-minimum maintenance (ensuring that heat isn't a problem and so on).

Whatever your parents decide, I wish you luck!
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September 8, 2013 8:50:00 AM

A lot of excellent responses in this thread. Started typing mine before there were any :) 

quilciri said:

On top of that, you can upgrade a PC you built yourself without voiding any warranties. :) 


Great point.
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September 8, 2013 11:51:43 AM

Fulgurant said:
Foxy2013 said:
Ok i am pretty confident building a pc by following online tutorials but my parents who are paying for it think that it would be easy to mess up and loosing money.

Can you explain to my parents that it is not hard.

Il show this to them.


Honestly, I'm a little torn on this one. I've built my own PCs for about 15 years now, and even when I first started it was surprisingly easy. (I imagine it'd be easier to build your first rig nowadays, what with youtube tutorials and more consistent hardware standards and better chassis designs and whatnot.)

That said, I was about 20 years old when I started. I wasn't living with my parents. I don't know how old you are, and although I have every confidence that (for example) a 15-year-old kid could build a PC, I'm not sure I'd be eager to pay for him to try. In principle, the task is pretty simple -- not much more difficult than assembling, say, a child's bicycle on Christmas Day. As long as you're careful, everything will fit together just fine.

But you might get a dud part, which would lead to your having to troubleshoot the problem, remove the part, send it back to the manufacturer, and wait for a replacement. Or worse, you might install something incorrectly, perhaps damaging the part in the process.

Then again, one of the perks of building your own is that you have fine-tune control over the components. You have individual warranties on all of them (in many cases, multi-year warranties); if you have a problem, chances are you'll get better service from the component manufacturer than you would from the Dells of the world. And it won't cost you anything to buy that warranty service.

Which brings us to the biggest perk of all: you will pay less, and get significantly more, if you build your own rig. You will have access to higher-quality (and thus, generally speaking, longer-lasting) components, even down to the power supply.

The downside, as before, is that you're on your own, but that's not really a disadvantage as long as you're competent. I can almost guarantee that a reasonably intelligent layman with access to google can troubleshoot computer problems better than the phone jockeys at a generic tech-support desk ("Is the computer plugged in?" Why yes, yes it is.)

The main hurdle is in the first month or so of the system's life. Any inherent flaws in your parts will tend to make themselves known fairly quickly. Once they've demonstrated that they work correctly, computer parts generally last a very long time given bare-minimum maintenance (ensuring that heat isn't a problem and so on).

Whatever your parents decide, I wish you luck!


Thanks man and BTW i am 15 and my uncle could put one together also. The reason i asked is that i could get alot more for my money(well parents money) it is going to be a family/work/gaming pc and my parents dont want to spend more than about £580 including a monitor, keyboard ect. Now i can do this easy if i get a nice monitor off ebay. I just wish that my parents give me a chance. Well thanks anyway.
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