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Anti-Static Wrist Strap does it realy necessary

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September 10, 2013 11:23:30 AM

does the Anti-Static Wrist Strap realy necessary when building a gaming pc and touch the cpu and motherboard etc which they are expensive i dont want to damage anything and also i dont have
Anti-Static Wrist Strap
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September 10, 2013 11:25:09 AM

I don't want to give out bad advice but I have never used one. Just touch the case or any large grounded object every now and then to discharge any built up static electricity. Build your computer on a table preferably not on carpet.
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September 10, 2013 11:29:14 AM

never used one for years....learned in school and always had to use one..for years I did. now I only ever use one when building a full system other then that no. just tough the case
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September 10, 2013 11:29:53 AM

burdenbound said:
I don't want to give out bad advice but I have never used one. Just touch the case or any large grounded object every now and then to discharge any built up static electricity. Build your computer on a table preferably not on carpet.


+1

Sitting at a table and constantly touching metal, like your computer case (non painted part) should be okay. You can even touch the package of each item to the case before opening etc. However, if you are having one of those days where you can shock yourself after walking across the room and touching metal, than I'd recommend getting a wrist strap.


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September 10, 2013 11:31:12 AM

If you have good "hands discipline" - be mindful of how you grab components, maintaining contact with the case whenever you bring anything in/out of it, be mindful of any time you break contact, etc., you can make-do without straps.

If you do not want to have to worry about that, then you need the anti-static grounded project mat, the anti-static grounding strap and all that other stuff.
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September 10, 2013 11:32:38 AM

HI ,

+1 burdenbound, I've been building computers for about 15 years now, I even worked in a shop to build computers and never had any static damage any components.

Just be careful:
1-don't sit or wear any static clothing or chair. Work in a place without carpet.
2- build the computer on a wooden or metal table (not plastic).
3- Before manipulation, you can hold a faucet for a few seconds, this will get rid of static electricity.
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September 10, 2013 11:34:00 AM

I do exactly as burdenbound, i touch a grouded part (generally the case or the psu) Make sure to be on anything but carpet/plastic and keep the PSU plugged-in but switch turned off (if the PC is already build and/or almost finish, that wil still provide ground through the wall socket and ensure you'll not be electrocuted at the same time)

Also the main sensible parts are mostly RAM, Motherboard and CPU and GPU, HDD and opticals drives don't really have trouble dealing with EMI as they're mostly shielded by the inside, as For SSD, i don't know but i suspect that good Shielding is used too and PSU, and any fans or controller, or any other devices like water pump or any other piece of equipement aren't affected by an EMI discharge...
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September 10, 2013 11:35:08 AM

burdenbound said:
I don't want to give out bad advice but I have never used one. Just touch the case or any large grounded object every now and then to discharge any built up static electricity. Build your computer on a table preferably not on carpet.


I've never used one either. It's paying money for something you don't need that only provides you with a false sense of security. If you get a product that's defective, you get a product that is defective. It generally has nothing to do with static - either you set the product up correctly as per the instruction manual, or you didn't. What I generally do with builds is I work standing on a plastic chair mat and thoroughly clean the surface I'm working on before I start, that usually eliminates the possibility of dust contaminating your build and the chair mat eliminates the possibility of static build up.
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September 10, 2013 12:51:33 PM

I never used one either...
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September 16, 2013 11:27:41 AM

When I'm putting together electronic parts I'll usually wear rubber gloves anyway as I don't want to have the oils from my skin touching the circuits (just an OCD thing ;D).
The above answers are correct anyway...you don't need to wear a anti-static strap if you take minimal precautions.
1.Don't do your build over shag rug
2.Don't rub balloons and such on your person.
3.Metal or wood working bench
4.Clean environment (give the floor a good sweep)
5.Touch the inside of your case (you'll be doing that anyway)
6.Don't put the parts you take out of their anti-static bag on anything but the bag.

I'm sure there are more precautions you could take (holding the faucet is a good one) but going above and beyond isn't really necessary...there's a fairly slim chance that you'll be giving off a static charge if you're mindful of it.
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September 16, 2013 1:26:27 PM

Hedobum said:
5.Touch the inside of your case (you'll be doing that anyway)

Why 'inside'? That puts your end closer to sensitive components than necessary and some cases have painted interior so touching 'inside' is not necessarily any safer than any other metallic surface. Touching a bare-metal is ideal but painted metallic surfaces are just about as good since the paint's breakdown voltage is usually negligible for ESD purposes.
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September 16, 2013 1:49:11 PM

Quick question, would building on a glass table be ok?
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September 16, 2013 1:55:10 PM

Xavier Bouttier said:
Quick question, would building on a glass table be ok?


sure, just don't rub it with fur

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September 16, 2013 2:12:41 PM

ScrewySqrl said:
Xavier Bouttier said:
Quick question, would building on a glass table be ok?


sure, just don't rub it with fur




Actually, glass is a very good insulator, not good. Perhaps if you covered it with a lightly damp tablecloth?
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September 16, 2013 2:28:05 PM

InvalidError said:
Hedobum said:
5.Touch the inside of your case (you'll be doing that anyway)

Why 'inside'? That puts your end closer to sensitive components than necessary and some cases have painted interior so touching 'inside' is not necessarily any safer than any other metallic surface. Touching a bare-metal is ideal but painted metallic surfaces are just about as good since the paint's breakdown voltage is usually negligible for ESD purposes.


While it's true that paint doesn't create too much of a difference in terms of ESD, the insides of cases have much less of (or none at all) a grounding barrier between you and the metal. While some cases are painted on the inside, the interior coat is much less than what you would find on the exterior...just that extra level of safety.
When you're doing a build, "your end" needs to be closer to those sensitive components. Kinda goes without saying that to build a computer, you're going to have to put your hands on those sensitive components.
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