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help with gaming pc build 2000$ budget

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September 13, 2013 10:52:29 AM

i need a good gaming pc build
budget: 2000$

i will need for bf4 - ultra settings
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September 13, 2013 11:01:35 AM

yoloyoloty said:
i need a good gaming pc build
budget: 2000$

i will need for bf4 - ultra settings


Do you have any preferences i.e. AMD/intel/Nvidia? And do you need a monitor/OS/keyboard/mouse?
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September 13, 2013 11:06:24 AM

Drew010 said:
yoloyoloty said:
i need a good gaming pc build
budget: 2000$

i will need for bf4 - ultra settings


Do you have any preferences i.e. AMD/intel/Nvidia? And do you need a monitor/OS/keyboard/mouse?


i want it to have the new intel 4770k and i prefer nvidia for graphics card .... i dont need mouse/keyboard/os/monitor etc
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September 13, 2013 11:26:23 AM

Here is a perfect build that will max out any game currently out at 1080p and will definitely max out BF4. Only thing is you might want to replace the fans that come with the H100i with better ones (Corsair SP-120 performance editions are good)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($334.96 @ Outlet PC)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z87 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($234.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($147.98 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($647.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Cooler Master HAF XM (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1897.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-09-13 14:26 EDT-0400)

I've also seen some good things with the Silverstone Tundra TD02 AIO liquid cooler, and I plan on getting that here soon myself.
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September 13, 2013 12:07:47 PM

Drew010 said:
Here is a perfect build that will max out any game currently out at 1080p and will definitely max out BF4. Only thing is you might want to replace the fans that come with the H100i with better ones (Corsair SP-120 performance editions are good)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($334.96 @ Outlet PC)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z87 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($234.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($147.98 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($647.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Cooler Master HAF XM (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1897.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-09-13 14:26 EDT-0400)

I've also seen some good things with the Silverstone Tundra TD02 AIO liquid cooler, and I plan on getting that here soon myself.


No, if this is a gaming rig you are doing it wrong. Way too much money being spent in all the wrong places and not enough being spent where it counts: the GPU. The Sabertooth is expensive and overrated, you don't need an i7 or 16GB high speed RAM for gaming, that's a waste of money. Get dual 770s instead - it will destroy a single 780, on a gaming rig the GPU *ALWAYS* comes first, everything else comes second.

Get this instead:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Swiftech H220 55.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($57.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Phantom 630 (Gunmetal) ATX Full Tower Case ($159.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000G2 1000W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($169.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1940.89
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-09-13 15:07 EDT-0400)

Dual GTX 770 will pretty much annihilate anything that comes along in its' path, except for maybe dual Titans or dual 780s.
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September 13, 2013 12:26:42 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Drew010 said:
Here is a perfect build that will max out any game currently out at 1080p and will definitely max out BF4. Only thing is you might want to replace the fans that come with the H100i with better ones (Corsair SP-120 performance editions are good)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($334.96 @ Outlet PC)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z87 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($234.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($147.98 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($84.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Video Card ($647.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Cooler Master HAF XM (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1897.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-09-13 14:26 EDT-0400)

I've also seen some good things with the Silverstone Tundra TD02 AIO liquid cooler, and I plan on getting that here soon myself.


No, if this is a gaming rig you are doing it wrong. Way too much money being spent in all the wrong places and not enough being spent where it counts: the GPU. The Sabertooth is expensive and overrated, you don't need an i7 or 16GB high speed RAM for gaming, that's a waste of money. Get dual 770s instead - it will destroy a single 780, on a gaming rig the GPU *ALWAYS* comes first, everything else comes second.

Get this instead:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Swiftech H220 55.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme6 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($57.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($399.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Phantom 630 (Gunmetal) ATX Full Tower Case ($159.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA 1000G2 1000W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($169.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1940.89
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-09-13 15:07 EDT-0400)

Dual GTX 770 will pretty much annihilate anything that comes along in its' path, except for maybe dual Titans or dual 780s.


He specifically requested the 4770. Read his post. As for the build, I made it so that it can easily be upgraded in the future. 1866 isn't high speed, it's perfect for gaming. The next gen games put the recommended RAM amount at 8GB, having 16GB means he won't have to upgrade anytime soon. Also I only got 1 780 because it is better to have a single GPU than SLI, and down the road he can add another. As for the MOBO, it has a lot of good features and ASUS is one of, if not the best manufacturer out there.
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September 13, 2013 2:44:06 PM

Drew010 said:
He specifically requested the 4770. Read his post. As for the build, I made it so that it can easily be upgraded in the future. 1866 isn't high speed, it's perfect for gaming. The next gen games put the recommended RAM amount at 8GB, having 16GB means he won't have to upgrade anytime soon.


There simply is no need for the 4770K on a gaming rig. Any CPU hierarchy chart on the internet will tell you there's virtually no difference between the two CPUs. 1866 RAM just isn't needed either - if something goes wrong on your CPU and you've been using RAM above a certain speed, Intel can and will void your warranty. You just don't need 16GB of RAM either - RAM prices are so ridiculously high right now, and even hardcore games like Crysis don't even use more than 6GB. It will be a very long time before games make use of 16GB. Future proofing is a moot point too - no matter how long you think your rig is going to last, it will not last that long before at least a GPU upgrade is required. But the GPU, bar none is where you want to spend the money on a gaming rig. Everything else comes second.

Quote:
Also I only got 1 780 because it is better to have a single GPU than SLI, and down the road he can add another


Please show me where this is true. That might be true with AMD cards, at least before Catalyst 13.8 was released, but that does not hold true anymore. Especially with games getting far more graphically intense.

Quote:
As for the MOBO, it has a lot of good features and ASUS is one of, if not the best manufacturer out there.


Asus makes some great motherboards, but the Sabertooth ain't one of 'em. It's overpriced for what you get and that plastic thermal armor is prone to overheating issues. And their only solution is to include two ridiculously cheap 80mm fans that just recirculate the already heated air trapped under the motherboard. As long as Asus continues to use that awful design, I will refuse to recommend it. There's other boards you can get that are better for overclocking, and cost less at that, while still providing you with all the SATA connectors and PCI slots you need. The Asrock Extreme 6 is better constructed than the Sabertooth, has won lots of editor's choice awards from respectable websites, has a BIOS that practically takes all the guesswork out of overclocking, and is $70 cheaper. How can you go wrong?
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September 13, 2013 3:00:41 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Drew010 said:
He specifically requested the 4770. Read his post. As for the build, I made it so that it can easily be upgraded in the future. 1866 isn't high speed, it's perfect for gaming. The next gen games put the recommended RAM amount at 8GB, having 16GB means he won't have to upgrade anytime soon.


There simply is no need for the 4770K on a gaming rig. Any CPU hierarchy chart on the internet will tell you there's virtually no difference between the two CPUs. 1866 RAM just isn't needed either - if something goes wrong on your CPU and you've been using RAM above a certain speed, Intel can and will void your warranty. You just don't need 16GB of RAM either - RAM prices are so ridiculously high right now, and even hardcore games like Crysis don't even use more than 6GB. It will be a very long time before games make use of 16GB. Future proofing is a moot point too - no matter how long you think your rig is going to last, it will not last that long before at least a GPU upgrade is required. But the GPU, bar none is where you want to spend the money on a gaming rig. Everything else comes second.

Quote:
Also I only got 1 780 because it is better to have a single GPU than SLI, and down the road he can add another


Please show me where this is true. That might be true with AMD cards, at least before Catalyst 13.8 was released, but that does not hold true anymore. Especially with games getting far more graphically intense.

Quote:
As for the MOBO, it has a lot of good features and ASUS is one of, if not the best manufacturer out there.


Asus makes some great motherboards, but the Sabertooth ain't one of 'em. It's overpriced for what you get and that plastic thermal armor is prone to overheating issues. And their only solution is to include two ridiculously cheap 80mm fans that just recirculate the already heated air trapped under the motherboard. As long as Asus continues to use that awful design, I will refuse to recommend it. There's other boards you can get that are better for overclocking, and cost less at that, while still providing you with all the SATA connectors and PCI slots you need. The Asrock Extreme 6 is better constructed than the Sabertooth, has won lots of editor's choice awards from respectable websites, has a BIOS that practically takes all the guesswork out of overclocking, and is $70 cheaper. How can you go wrong?


The OP requested a 4770, so I gave him one. I'm not an idiot, I know that there isn't much gain over the 4670 in terms of gaming, I'm here to help him come up with a build, not forcefully tell him what he must build. As for 1866 RAM, intel's Haswell processors are specified to run up to 1866Mhz RAM so that is a non-issue. With 16GB you can run a RAMDISK and basically supercharge any game loading times you want to play (I know it's amazing on Skyrim). And also the specs for BF4 state recommended 8GB RAM, generally if you want to completely max out a game you want more than the recommended. As for the MOBO, the heat isn't an issue unless you live in a very hot place with terrible circulation in your case.
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September 13, 2013 3:12:21 PM

Quote:
The OP requested a 4770, so I gave him one. I'm not an idiot, I know that there isn't much gain over the 4670 in terms of gaming, I'm here to help him come up with a build, not forcefully tell him what he must build.


Whoa, where did I say I was forcefully telling someone what to buy? I'm just trying to explain the difference between what is practical and necessary for a good gaming experience, and what isn't. When you're buying a gaming rig, you don't need to spend money in places where you don't have to, and overpaying for a part is just plain ridiculous. It will not make a rig future proof, and you just don't need to spend money where you do not have to, that's all I'm trying to say. Ideally, having a dual GPU / triple monitor setup is the ultimate in gaming right now, anything less and I wouldn't recommend spending that kind of a budget on a rig.

Quote:
As for 1866 RAM, intel's Haswell processors are specified to run up to 1866Mhz RAM so that is a non-issue. With 16GB you can run a RAMDISK and basically supercharge any game loading times you want to play (I know it's amazing on Skyrim).


Huh, now this I have not heard before. I definitely know what a RAM disk is and how to set one up but I've never seen that it's beneficial for a gaming experience. That makes a bit more sense. I would like to see some documentation about this if you have any links.

Quote:
As for the MOBO, the heat isn't an issue unless you live in a very hot place with terrible circulation in your case.


I can't speak for everyone but I live in Southern California, in what is essentially a gigantic wind tunnel. :lol: 

But where you live doesn't affect heat recirculating inside your PC, every component generates heat, and that is a fact. But what makes the Sabertooth a bad motherboard is that it recirculates heat that's already inside your PC. You want to set your air flow up in a way that it moves air in a constant circular motion with air escaping out the rear exhaust fan. Not trap it and recirculate it with no chance of escaping.
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September 13, 2013 3:50:23 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
The OP requested a 4770, so I gave him one. I'm not an idiot, I know that there isn't much gain over the 4670 in terms of gaming, I'm here to help him come up with a build, not forcefully tell him what he must build.


Whoa, where did I say I was forcefully telling someone what to buy? I'm just trying to explain the difference between what is practical and necessary for a good gaming experience, and what isn't. When you're buying a gaming rig, you don't need to spend money in places where you don't have to, and overpaying for a part is just plain ridiculous. It will not make a rig future proof, and you just don't need to spend money where you do not have to, that's all I'm trying to say. Ideally, having a dual GPU / triple monitor setup is the ultimate in gaming right now, anything less and I wouldn't recommend spending that kind of a budget on a rig.

Quote:
As for 1866 RAM, intel's Haswell processors are specified to run up to 1866Mhz RAM so that is a non-issue. With 16GB you can run a RAMDISK and basically supercharge any game loading times you want to play (I know it's amazing on Skyrim).


Huh, now this I have not heard before. I definitely know what a RAM disk is and how to set one up but I've never seen that it's beneficial for a gaming experience. That makes a bit more sense. I would like to see some documentation about this if you have any links.

Quote:
As for the MOBO, the heat isn't an issue unless you live in a very hot place with terrible circulation in your case.


I can't speak for everyone but I live in Southern California, in what is essentially a gigantic wind tunnel. :lol: 

But where you live doesn't affect heat recirculating inside your PC, every component generates heat, and that is a fact. But what makes the Sabertooth a bad motherboard is that it recirculates heat that's already inside your PC. You want to set your air flow up in a way that it moves air in a constant circular motion with air escaping out the rear exhaust fan. Not trap it and recirculate it with no chance of escaping.


I agree that ideally having dual/triple SLI is the most powerful, but still to eliminate any issues whatsoever (I know SLI is pretty solid, but not perfect) a single GPU is best. And it doesn't get much better than the 780. Also yes, RAMDISKS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAM_drive) make games with frequent loading screens i.e. WoW and Skyrim significantly faster. As for the circulation, I meant that unless you have a high ambient temp, not poor wind in your area. As I'm sure you're well aware that you can't cool below ambient without a medium such as NO2 or peltier cooling. You also want heat to go UP out of your case, which you can set the fans on the Z87 to do (also depends on the orientation of your MOBO in case)
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September 13, 2013 3:59:58 PM

Quote:
I agree that ideally having dual/triple SLI is the most powerful, but still to eliminate any issues whatsoever (I know SLI is pretty solid, but not perfect) a single GPU is best. And it doesn't get much better than the 780. Also yes, RAMDISKS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAM_drive) make games with frequent loading screens i.e. WoW and Skyrim significantly faster.


A link to Wikipedia on the subject doesn't really help me. I want to see some actual in-game benchmarks that show the difference between having the RAM disk vs. not having it.

Quote:
I'm sure you're well aware that you can't cool below ambient without a medium such as NO2 or peltier cooling. You also want heat to go UP out of your case, which you can set the fans on the Z87 to do (also depends on the orientation of your MOBO in case)


Oh yeah of course, having proper cooling makes all the difference in the world in how your build performs. I'm definitely not arguing there.
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