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Does Intel CPU voltage increase the memory controller voltage?

Last response: in Overclocking
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September 13, 2013 4:46:56 PM

Specs:
Core i5 3570K
ASUS P8Z77-V LK
16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3-1600 1.5v

Now, all that RAM has huge heatsinks, but runs at room temperature, so it's just ASKING for a nice overclock.


I've heard, however, that the difference between the RAM voltage and the memory controller voltage can only be about 0.5v.

However, I don't get any kind of BIOS voltage option like "MCU", "QPI", or "VCCIO". Does this mean this voltage cannot be adjusted? Or is this voltage also the CPU voltage?

So how do I raise the voltage of the memory controller?
a c 81 K Overclocking
a b } Memory
September 13, 2013 5:14:24 PM

Please post a screenshot of the voltage options in the bios.
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a b K Overclocking
a b } Memory
September 13, 2013 5:20:57 PM

Vccsa controls vccio for you, it's in ai tweaker. You shouldn't need to change it.
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a c 81 K Overclocking
a b } Memory
September 13, 2013 5:24:00 PM

I wasn't sure if that was in the settings, since it's been a while since I used that mobo (same one), but you won't really need to raise the VCCSA voltage, like k1114 said. Just raise the DRAM voltage.

Any reason that you are overclocking your RAM?
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September 13, 2013 11:48:16 PM

Partially because I bought the RAM to overclock it. It has huge heatsinks, but runs room temperature at stock. While I'm not expecting the same kind of results, my previous system had 800MHz DDR2 that I overclocked t about 1188MHz. This set hasn't been as successful. At least at stock settings.

The other reason is that I would like more CPU overclock options, like BCLK, which would affect more components than just the CPU, but I wouldn't want to underclock my RAM in the process, so I would rather have the option to overclock it.

I would like to see 1866. This RAM is supposed to hit that mark rather easily.

But Intel states there is potential degradation if vRAM - VccIO > 0.5v. If I'm right, this has to do with reverse-biasing P-N junctions in the chip past breakdown, causing current to flow back into the processor through the outputs, resulting in massive heat and breakdown of the silicon. (If you've ever messed up a Zener Diode, you know what I mean.)
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