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How to know which CPU is "best silicon" for OC

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September 14, 2013 9:27:19 AM

Hey guys, so yeah I have 3 builds waiting to be built (as soon as the cases arrive next thursday). I am planning on overclocking down the road. I am going to be keeping one of those builds and the other 2 I will be giving to 2 friends. I've been reading on this forums that some people get "good" chips that OC at low voltage I think? Im not an OCing pro, still new to this.

So my question is; How can I pick the best chip that OCs?Please make it detailed as Im very new to this topic.

The build is:http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Moustafaelsawy/saved/1Rmg

Thanks in advance!

More about : cpu silicon

a c 76 K Overclocking
a c 141 à CPUs
September 14, 2013 9:35:22 AM

I think it's also known as the "silicon gamble" - since no chip is 100% identical, it just so happens that some CPUs that get purchased happen to be "better" than other ones. There is no way to know before buying the CPU itself and trying to overclock it, hence the "gamble."
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September 14, 2013 9:39:56 AM

Calculatron said:
I think it's also known as the "silicon gamble" - since no chip is 100% identical, it just so happens that some CPUs that get purchased happen to be "better" than other ones. There is no way to know before buying the CPU itself and trying to overclock it, hence the "gamble."


Yeah thats what I was talking about exactly, i'll have the 3 build at my house cause Im the one building them. So I was actually asking how to test them when Im done building the 3 pc's?
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September 14, 2013 9:40:58 AM

Just for clarification; I will be building the 3 systems at home and installing windows etc. So I guess I can do some tests to spot the "best silicon gamble" or?
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a c 76 K Overclocking
a c 141 à CPUs
September 14, 2013 6:58:51 PM

You'll have to attempt overclocking them, and see which one will give the best overclock, particularly with the lowest voltage.
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a c 177 K Overclocking
a c 116 à CPUs
September 14, 2013 8:09:23 PM

No expert on overclocking myself, but I hear that a good way to test is to see how low on voltage you can go at stock speeds and have it still run. Would save you the effort of doing a proper overclock on each one.
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a c 76 K Overclocking
a c 141 à CPUs
September 14, 2013 8:28:55 PM

manofchalk said:
No expert on overclocking myself, but I hear that a good way to test is to see how low on voltage you can go at stock speeds and have it still run. Would save you the effort of doing a proper overclock on each one.


This is what I get for replying to subjects right after work.
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September 15, 2013 5:57:48 AM

manofchalk said:
No expert on overclocking myself, but I hear that a good way to test is to see how low on voltage you can go at stock speeds and have it still run. Would save you the effort of doing a proper overclock on each one.


Yeah, it sounds so simple when you guys say it; But as I said im a noob when it comes to OCing. Can you tell me steps that I have to go through in the bios? (MSI z87-g45 MOBO) Like how much the increments I have to decrease in the voltage (and which voltage) and how to know when has it become unstable? etc.. Please use as much details as possible :( 
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a c 239 K Overclocking
a c 103 à CPUs
September 15, 2013 7:13:11 AM

Moustafa_Elsawy said:
Hey guys, so yeah I have 3 builds waiting to be built (as soon as the cases arrive next thursday). I am planning on overclocking down the road. I am going to be keeping one of those builds and the other 2 I will be giving to 2 friends. I've been reading on this forums that some people get "good" chips that OC at low voltage I think? Im not an OCing pro, still new to this.

So my question is; How can I pick the best chip that OCs?Please make it detailed as Im very new to this topic.

The build is:http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Moustafaelsawy/saved/1Rmg

Thanks in advance!



So basically you want to keep the best overclocker for yourself, so down the road you can have the best of the best, is that your fee for building these machines or are you just footing the entire bill and giving them away to your friends out of the kindness of your heart?

Looking at your parts list, I would have chosen an ASUS M/B over MSI, and G.Skill memory over Corsair, but that's neither here nor there.

The best way to learn the best overclocker is to overclock up to about maybe 4.2ghz which the Noctua NH-D14 can easily handle, and see which setup stabilizes at 4.2ghz using the least voltage to do it, and you would need to discover this manually!

However you will also discover the hard way, that the same inconsistencies not only apply to the CPU but the motherboard and memory used as well, you could have inconsistencies that are memory related, or inconsistencies that are motherboard related, that don't have a thing to do with the CPUs silicon quality.

So to be sure you would need to swap each CPU from setup to setup and run additional comparisons, to eliminate problems with the other M/Bs or Memory modules, in other words you have a lot of work ahead of you!

Under these circumstances I'd be more concerned I got three complete workable sets of components and didn't have to spend time RMAing DOA components, or components that fail within the first 30 days.

As far as the testing settings, Google a Haswell overclocking guide, and maybe you could find one that even uses your motherboards you've chosen, good luck to you!

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September 15, 2013 8:26:22 AM

4Ryan6 said:
Moustafa_Elsawy said:
Hey guys, so yeah I have 3 builds waiting to be built (as soon as the cases arrive next thursday). I am planning on overclocking down the road. I am going to be keeping one of those builds and the other 2 I will be giving to 2 friends. I've been reading on this forums that some people get "good" chips that OC at low voltage I think? Im not an OCing pro, still new to this.

So my question is; How can I pick the best chip that OCs?Please make it detailed as Im very new to this topic.

The build is:http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Moustafaelsawy/saved/1Rmg

Thanks in advance!



So basically you want to keep the best overclocker for yourself, so down the road you can have the best of the best, is that your fee for building these machines or are you just footing the entire bill and giving them away to your friends out of the kindness of your heart?

Looking at your parts list, I would have chosen an ASUS M/B over MSI, and G.Skill memory over Corsair, but that's neither here nor there.

The best way to learn the best overclocker is to overclock up to about maybe 4.2ghz which the Noctua NH-D14 can easily handle, and see which setup stabilizes at 4.2ghz using the least voltage to do it, and you would need to discover this manually!

However you will also discover the hard way, that the same inconsistencies not only apply to the CPU but the motherboard and memory used as well, you could have inconsistencies that are memory related, or inconsistencies that are motherboard related, that don't have a thing to do with the CPUs silicon quality.

So to be sure you would need to swap each CPU from setup to setup and run additional comparisons, to eliminate problems with the other M/Bs or Memory modules, in other words you have a lot of work ahead of you!

Under these circumstances I'd be more concerned I got three complete workable sets of components and didn't have to spend time RMAing DOA components, or components that fail within the first 30 days.

As far as the testing settings, Google a Haswell overclocking guide, and maybe you could find one that even uses your motherboards you've chosen, good luck to you!



You can think of it as a kind of fee for ordering,going with all the shipping processes, and assembling it hahaha.

But man It looks like a hard task for a beginner builder(moving cpu's from one build to another and reapplying the paste etc takes some work). Do you think its worth it if im planning to overclock to safe 4.4GHz at maximum.

And considering the RMA, I am screwed already. Cause I live in dubai I had to order the parts from newegg and have them shipped to a friend, then that friend had them shipped to me in dubai, but there was one problem: The 3 cases (30kg). Anyways problems happened and I ended up getting the parts 40 days earlier and the case arrives in a couple of days... So basically the parts all have about 40 days on them cause I was waiting for the case all that time :S.. Man Im terrified now, are faulty parts that common :( ?

Edit: From my knowledge, I am allowed to return any part within 30days, otherwise I lose the part and cant return it? Sorry im new to the ordering and return policy stuff. Say I get one faulty part (I HOPE NOT GOD FORBID :'(  ) will I be able to do anything about it?
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Best solution

a c 239 K Overclocking
a c 103 à CPUs
September 15, 2013 8:54:12 AM

Most component failures not happening right out of the box usually rear their ugly heads way before 30 days, usually within the first 72 hours of operation, that's not set in stone statistics just discoveries from my own experience, usually any parts lasting past 30 days are good to go.

For the record; you could have set up and tested each of the components configurations outside of a case, that's what most of us do if we have to wait an excessive time for a case to house it in, all you would have needed in hand was a power supply, the motherboards, CPU, Memory Modules, GPU, keyboard, mouse, and display monitor.

Usually using the motherboards static protection bag it's shipped in to sit the motherboard on to run the testing, but this late in the game you may as well wait since you are already past the 30 days.

If you are past the 30 days you'll have to RMA a bad part to the manufacturer of the part.

Hopefully everything works right out of the box, so don't worry at this point until you have something solid to worry about!

I also wouldn't worry about determining the best overclocker of the 3, either of them will do approximately the same, just learn how to overclock first before you even attempt it.

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September 15, 2013 11:36:56 AM

4Ryan6 said:
Most component failures not happening right out of the box usually rear their ugly heads way before 30 days, usually within the first 72 hours of operation, that's not set in stone statistics just discoveries from my own experience, usually any parts lasting past 30 days are good to go.

For the record; you could have set up and tested each of the components configurations outside of a case, that's what most of us do if we have to wait an excessive time for a case to house it in, all you would have needed in hand was a power supply, the motherboards, CPU, Memory Modules, GPU, keyboard, mouse, and display monitor.

Usually using the motherboards static protection bag it's shipped in to sit the motherboard on to run the testing, but this late in the game you may as well wait since you are already past the 30 days.

If you are past the 30 days you'll have to RMA a bad part to the manufacturer of the part.

Hopefully everything works right out of the box, so don't worry at this point until you have something solid to worry about!

I also wouldn't worry about determining the best overclocker of the 3, either of them will do approximately the same, just learn how to overclock first before you even attempt it.



I was going to test them out of a case but I was scared ill damage something either by deassembling them back in the box or if I decide on keeping it together the risk of my small brother smashing it.

thanks for making me feel better almost cried there LOL. Hopefully hopefully everything installs and runs fine. Thanks alot guys!

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a c 157 K Overclocking
a c 96 à CPUs
September 16, 2013 12:02:16 PM

Don't do it this way!!

4Ryan6 said:
Most component failures not happening right out of the box usually rear their ugly heads way before 30 days, usually within the first 72 hours of operation, that's not set in stone statistics just discoveries from my own experience, usually any parts lasting past 30 days are good to go.

For the record; you could have set up and tested each of the components configurations outside of a case, that's what most of us do if we have to wait an excessive time for a case to house it in, all you would have needed in hand was a power supply, the motherboards, CPU, Memory Modules, GPU, keyboard, mouse, and display monitor.

Usually using the motherboards static protection bag it's shipped in to sit the motherboard on to run the testing, but this late in the game you may as well wait since you are already past the 30 days.

If you are past the 30 days you'll have to RMA a bad part to the manufacturer of the part.

Hopefully everything works right out of the box, so don't worry at this point until you have something solid to worry about!

I also wouldn't worry about determining the best overclocker of the 3, either of them will do approximately the same, just learn how to overclock first before you even attempt it.



The anti-static bags that the MBs come in are CONDUCTIVE and they are absolutely the worst possible thing to run a test on the MB outside of the case! The bag can short out the MB and fry all of your components!

Just set the MB on the bare MB box and that will work just fine.

Good luck!

Yogi

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a c 239 K Overclocking
a c 103 à CPUs
September 17, 2013 2:20:47 AM

Y0GI said:
Don't do it this way!!

4Ryan6 said:
Most component failures not happening right out of the box usually rear their ugly heads way before 30 days, usually within the first 72 hours of operation, that's not set in stone statistics just discoveries from my own experience, usually any parts lasting past 30 days are good to go.

For the record; you could have set up and tested each of the components configurations outside of a case, that's what most of us do if we have to wait an excessive time for a case to house it in, all you would have needed in hand was a power supply, the motherboards, CPU, Memory Modules, GPU, keyboard, mouse, and display monitor.

Usually using the motherboards static protection bag it's shipped in to sit the motherboard on to run the testing, but this late in the game you may as well wait since you are already past the 30 days.

If you are past the 30 days you'll have to RMA a bad part to the manufacturer of the part.

Hopefully everything works right out of the box, so don't worry at this point until you have something solid to worry about!

I also wouldn't worry about determining the best overclocker of the 3, either of them will do approximately the same, just learn how to overclock first before you even attempt it.



The anti-static bags that the MBs come in are CONDUCTIVE and they are absolutely the worst possible thing to run a test on the MB outside of the case! The bag can short out the MB and fry all of your components!

Just set the MB on the bare MB box and that will work just fine.

Good luck!

Yogi



Thanks Yogi, That's the first I heard of that so I have to say I've been very lucky to this point!

After reading your post I did some Ohm Meter tests on some of the anti-static bags I have and they all showed being very slightly conductive.

That's great news Yogi!

To the OP, definitely do not use the M/B anti-static bag, use the M/B box as Yogi suggested, or a non conductive table top.

Even the foam cushion some M/Bs are shipped with is also conductive.

I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks! :) 

Thanks Yogi

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a c 157 K Overclocking
a c 96 à CPUs
September 17, 2013 7:06:27 AM

4Ryan6 said:
Y0GI said:
Don't do it this way!!

4Ryan6 said:
Most component failures not happening right out of the box usually rear their ugly heads way before 30 days, usually within the first 72 hours of operation, that's not set in stone statistics just discoveries from my own experience, usually any parts lasting past 30 days are good to go.

For the record; you could have set up and tested each of the components configurations outside of a case, that's what most of us do if we have to wait an excessive time for a case to house it in, all you would have needed in hand was a power supply, the motherboards, CPU, Memory Modules, GPU, keyboard, mouse, and display monitor.

Usually using the motherboards static protection bag it's shipped in to sit the motherboard on to run the testing, but this late in the game you may as well wait since you are already past the 30 days.

If you are past the 30 days you'll have to RMA a bad part to the manufacturer of the part.

Hopefully everything works right out of the box, so don't worry at this point until you have something solid to worry about!

I also wouldn't worry about determining the best overclocker of the 3, either of them will do approximately the same, just learn how to overclock first before you even attempt it.



The anti-static bags that the MBs come in are CONDUCTIVE and they are absolutely the worst possible thing to run a test on the MB outside of the case! The bag can short out the MB and fry all of your components!

Just set the MB on the bare MB box and that will work just fine.

Good luck!

Yogi



Thanks Yogi, That's the first I heard of that so I have to say I've been very lucky to this point!

After reading your post I did some Ohm Meter tests on some of the anti-static bags I have and they all showed being very slightly conductive.

That's great news Yogi!

To the OP, definitely do not use the M/B anti-static bag, use the M/B box as Yogi suggested, or a non conductive table top.

Even the foam cushion some M/Bs are shipped with is also conductive.

I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks! :) 

Thanks Yogi



You're quite welcome, Ryan!

Yogi

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