Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Does this set up sound decent for my new gaming desktop?

Last response: in Systems
Share
September 14, 2013 8:34:45 PM

I just realized recently my computer is just way out dated so i wanted to but a new set up. The only thing i could have salvaged from my last set up is my PSU. 600W. Any feed back on my new set up would help greatly! thanks.

Hard Drive - Seagate Barracuda ST2000DM001
Ram - CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB DDR3
Processor - Intel Core i5-4670K Haswell
MOBO - ASUS Z87-A LGA

Ill soon buy a Graphics Card once i get the pc up and running but, i have one more question if its not to much to ask, the hard drive i have posted ^, is it beter than a ssd? or do i have to spend more money on a ssd to get the same qualities as a hd.
THANKS
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
September 14, 2013 8:38:12 PM

The HDD you picked should be fine, SSDs are still a newer technology so they sometimes cost more than justifiably you want to spend. SSDs speed up the times of Windows and program launches, but otherwise aren't that much of an improvement over HDDs. The other three parts look good as well.
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
September 14, 2013 8:41:01 PM

Now, SSDs are much more expensive than HDDs and don't accomplish much more than an HDD. You would want a small SSD to boot up your operating system, but as for games the computer will load the game from the HDD and put it in RAM so the performance of the HDD doesn't matter. It also has a lot more space than you would ever get on an SSD for a close price. Keep what you have and if you have questions on other parts you want let me know and I'll help you out.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 93 B Homebuilt system
a c 280 4 Gaming
September 14, 2013 10:32:50 PM

thepinkanator95 said:
Now, SSDs are much more expensive than HDDs and don't accomplish much more than an HDD. You would want a small SSD to boot up your operating system, but as for games the computer will load the game from the HDD and put it in RAM so the performance of the HDD doesn't matter. It also has a lot more space than you would ever get on an SSD for a close price. Keep what you have and if you have questions on other parts you want let me know and I'll help you out.


Are you serious? Any SSD you get is going to be significantly faster than any mechanical HD on the market. Now that we're seeing 750GB and 1TB SSDs start to get lower in price, we'll see NAND replacing and eventually eliminating traditional mechanical hard drives. But really, it's complete nonsense to say that SSDs don't accomplish anything that mechanical HDs don't. I won't build a system without one.

OP - if you post your budget that will help to suggest a system.
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
September 15, 2013 7:59:18 AM

g-unit1111 said:
thepinkanator95 said:
Now, SSDs are much more expensive than HDDs and don't accomplish much more than an HDD. You would want a small SSD to boot up your operating system, but as for games the computer will load the game from the HDD and put it in RAM so the performance of the HDD doesn't matter. It also has a lot more space than you would ever get on an SSD for a close price. Keep what you have and if you have questions on other parts you want let me know and I'll help you out.


Are you serious? Any SSD you get is going to be significantly faster than any mechanical HD on the market. Now that we're seeing 750GB and 1TB SSDs start to get lower in price, we'll see NAND replacing and eventually eliminating traditional mechanical hard drives. But really, it's complete nonsense to say that SSDs don't accomplish anything that mechanical HDs don't. I won't build a system without one.

OP - if you post your budget that will help to suggest a system.


There is no noticeable difference between an SSD and a 7200 RPM HDD when running third-party software, and if there is it diffinately is not to the point of shelling out that much extra money. The only thing SSDs are good for now (at their current price) is to load the operating system on as you will constantly be pulling information from the SSD. Any games or other software will just be pulled from the HDD and run from RAM.
m
0
l
a c 93 B Homebuilt system
a c 280 4 Gaming
September 16, 2013 12:15:46 AM

thepinkanator95 said:
There is no noticeable difference between an SSD and a 7200 RPM HDD when running third-party software, and if there is it diffinately is not to the point of shelling out that much extra money. The only thing SSDs are good for now (at their current price) is to load the operating system on as you will constantly be pulling information from the SSD. Any games or other software will just be pulled from the HDD and run from RAM.


Post some links that prove your claim and then I will believe it but there is a huge difference.
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
September 17, 2013 9:02:34 PM

g-unit1111 said:
thepinkanator95 said:
There is no noticeable difference between an SSD and a 7200 RPM HDD when running third-party software, and if there is it diffinately is not to the point of shelling out that much extra money. The only thing SSDs are good for now (at their current price) is to load the operating system on as you will constantly be pulling information from the SSD. Any games or other software will just be pulled from the HDD and run from RAM.


Post some links that prove your claim and then I will believe it but there is a huge difference.


The speed on an SSD comes from it's not having to physically speed up to the technical specifications in order to run the operating system. That is why it is so good for the operating system. Once the operating system is loaded however, the HDD is running at it's specified speed and still transfers data at 6 Gb/s just like an SSD if the HDD is properly defragmented (granted, an SSD doesn't have fragmentation problems and therefore is faster when the HDD is fragmented). At the current price of SSDs it is a waste to buy a large SSD as 128GB SSD is equal to a 1TB 7200RPM HDD.
m
0
l
a c 93 B Homebuilt system
a c 280 4 Gaming
September 17, 2013 10:14:03 PM

thepinkanator95 said:

The speed on an SSD comes from it's not having to physically speed up to the technical specifications in order to run the operating system. That is why it is so good for the operating system. Once the operating system is loaded however, the HDD is running at it's specified speed and still transfers data at 6 Gb/s just like an SSD if the HDD is properly defragmented (granted, an SSD doesn't have fragmentation problems and therefore is faster when the HDD is fragmented). At the current price of SSDs it is a waste to buy a large SSD as 128GB SSD is equal to a 1TB 7200RPM HDD.


You can justify all you want but until I see some actual numbers, I refuse to believe that a 128GB SSD is in the same league as a 1TB 7200 RPM hard drive.
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
September 18, 2013 2:24:42 PM

g-unit1111 said:
thepinkanator95 said:

The speed on an SSD comes from it's not having to physically speed up to the technical specifications in order to run the operating system. That is why it is so good for the operating system. Once the operating system is loaded however, the HDD is running at it's specified speed and still transfers data at 6 Gb/s just like an SSD if the HDD is properly defragmented (granted, an SSD doesn't have fragmentation problems and therefore is faster when the HDD is fragmented). At the current price of SSDs it is a waste to buy a large SSD as 128GB SSD is equal to a 1TB 7200RPM HDD.


You can justify all you want but until I see some actual numbers, I refuse to believe that a 128GB SSD is in the same league as a 1TB 7200 RPM hard drive.


Here is a website that proves my point.

HDDs are:

1. Cheaper per GB
2. Have a higher data transfer rate
3. Are available in MUCH larger sizes

SSDs have advantages and I'm not saying don't get one, but 32GB should suffice for your operating system and frequently used applications where the Random Access Time is important. For transferring a large game to RAM, an HDD will suffice.
m
0
l
a c 93 B Homebuilt system
a c 280 4 Gaming
September 18, 2013 2:55:11 PM

thepinkanator95 said:


Here is a website that proves my point.


I'm completely dumbfounded at that website, I've seen elementary school science fair projects that are better researched than that. The data transfer rates are completely wrong. :ange: 

Quote:
HDDs are:

1. Cheaper per GB
2. Have a higher data transfer rate
3. Are available in MUCH larger sizes


#1 and #3 are true, #2 is completely false: http://anandtech.com/bench/SSD/65

Look at the last benchmark - even a 10K RPM hard drive doesn't come close to matching the data transfer rates of the lowest SSD on the list.

Quote:

SSDs have advantages and I'm not saying don't get one, but 32GB should suffice for your operating system and frequently used applications where the Random Access Time is important. For transferring a large game to RAM, an HDD will suffice.


32GB will barely hold an OS. Formatting alone will take 5 - 10% of the drive, and a typical Windows installation takes 20GB alone. So you're probably left with 4GB after that.
m
0
l
a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
September 18, 2013 3:09:37 PM

And SSD slows down if it is too full. Good to have 10-20% free space in SSD.
And we know minium space where is good assemble windows is 4 x 20-32GB so 128GB is just there .
20GB x 4 = 80GB freesapce 20% = 96GB so smallest SSD we can tell you to buy is 120GB and bigger is better :) 
It is that simple. Allprograms that are in c drive where windows is runs really much faster beause on SSD speed.
This will make you whole buld run faster because all programs are faster. Simple as that :) 
m
0
l
a b 4 Gaming
September 18, 2013 4:18:58 PM

Well, AddictGamer, I suppose it' up to you. A 128 GB SSD is about $85 and a 1 TB 7200 RPM HDD is about $60. It's really up to you whether or not the performance of an SSD is worth $25 (250 GB worth of storage). I guess it would be a question do you want more games or faster games, or if you can find the money to pull off both do it. I don't believe it's worth the extra $25 and using an SSD before I didn't see much of a difference in performance when gaming. But it's up to you, this seems like it's going to turn into more of a debate of fanboys than anything. Good luck to you.
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 93 B Homebuilt system
a c 280 4 Gaming
September 18, 2013 4:45:03 PM

thepinkanator95 said:
Well, AddictGamer, I suppose it' up to you. A 128 GB SSD is about $85 and a 1 TB 7200 RPM HDD is about $60. It's really up to you whether or not the performance of an SSD is worth $25 (250 GB worth of storage). I guess it would be a question do you want more games or faster games, or if you can find the money to pull off both do it. I don't believe it's worth the extra $25 and using an SSD before I didn't see much of a difference in performance when gaming. But it's up to you, this seems like it's going to turn into more of a debate of fanboys than anything. Good luck to you.


You can have both drives in the same machine, you don't have to have one type of drive or the other. That works out to be a far more effective cost per GB solution than anything else on the market. Having both in one machine offers the lightning fast performance of fifth generation SSDs, and a mass storage drive means you don't have to watch what you store on your PC. A $120 SSD + a $60 1TB HD comes out to a cost per GB ratio of ($120 + $60) / (1000GB + 128GB) = $0.16/GB, and that's something that was not covered in that extremely poorly researched website you linked to. That's what I've always recommended, it's what I use personally, and I think it's worked out pretty well so far.
Share
!