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CPU low temp on idle but high temp on load

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September 15, 2013 12:55:17 AM

Im pretty noob with computer yet I manage to build my own computer. However, I would like to ask you all what this issue that I have stumble across could be. When I first build my computer with the h100i cooler, my temperature was fairly good idling at 29c to 30c and on full load it would be a 53c to 55c. However, after 6 months or so, my temperature just dramatically went up to the high 70s. I change the thermal paste acouple of time with arctic silver 5 yet its still the same. I decided to go air cooling from there which I got the Noctua NH D14 now which idle at 29-30c too. However, when under load it jump up pretty high like when I play Black Ops 2, it would reach 65c. I just dont get how my cpu would be heating up so much when it is stock. My cpu is an i5 3570k by the way. Maybe I have mistakely change something in the bios that is now making it work extra hard? I would greatly appreciate all of your feed backs because I clearly have no more ideas what could possibly be wrong. Thanks.
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September 15, 2013 1:15:45 AM

If you're absolutely sure your heatsink is mounted properly, then it might be worth checking your BIOS settings, especially things like "PLL overvoltage" & "Load Line Calibration". Try running HWMonitor in the background when under load and see what the "VCore max" says. If it's higher than it was originally (back when you had lower 55c load temps), then that's your problem. If it isn't, then it's either the heatsink or the heat-spreader.
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September 15, 2013 2:39:07 PM

BSim500 said:
If you're absolutely sure your heatsink is mounted properly, then it might be worth checking your BIOS settings, especially things like "PLL overvoltage" & "Load Line Calibration". Try running HWMonitor in the background when under load and see what the "VCore max" says. If it's higher than it was originally (back when you had lower 55c load temps), then that's your problem. If it isn't, then it's either the heatsink or the heat-spreader.


My cpu vcore monitor with CPUID is Value=1.208V Min=0.984V Max=1.224V
Im not sure whats my previous one since I have never monitor it. However, from the voltage that I have right now, is it bad or good?
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September 15, 2013 2:50:27 PM

changyang7 said:
My cpu vcore monitor with CPUID is Value=1.208V Min=0.984V Max=1.224V
Im not sure whats my previous one since I have never monitor it. However, from the voltage that I have right now, is it bad or good?

Every CPU is unique so it's hard to say without comparing it to what it was previously (when it ran cooler). It may simply be that your CPU needs 1.2v whereas another chip need 1.12v, another one 1.15v, etc, and yours is in the "upper" VID range. First thing I'd do is go into the BIOS and set "Load Line Calibration" to its lowest setting (it often over-compensates and feeds more voltage than is necessary).

If you don't intend to overclock at all, then maybe try undervolting - enter a negative voltage into the "offset" in the BIOS, eg, -0.01v. then test stability, then reduce it to -0.02v, then test again, etc. You may find you can run your CPU -0.1v lower than default at stock clock which would certainly reduce the load temperature. High 70's at stock does sound odd though, like maybe the heatsink isn't perfectly mounted?
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September 15, 2013 10:13:58 PM

BSim500 said:
changyang7 said:
My cpu vcore monitor with CPUID is Value=1.208V Min=0.984V Max=1.224V
Im not sure whats my previous one since I have never monitor it. However, from the voltage that I have right now, is it bad or good?

Every CPU is unique so it's hard to say without comparing it to what it was previously (when it ran cooler). It may simply be that your CPU needs 1.2v whereas another chip need 1.12v, another one 1.15v, etc, and yours is in the "upper" VID range. First thing I'd do is go into the BIOS and set "Load Line Calibration" to its lowest setting (it often over-compensates and feeds more voltage than is necessary).

If you don't intend to overclock at all, then maybe try undervolting - enter a negative voltage into the "offset" in the BIOS, eg, -0.01v. then test stability, then reduce it to -0.02v, then test again, etc. You may find you can run your CPU -0.1v lower than default at stock clock which would certainly reduce the load temperature. High 70's at stock does sound odd though, like maybe the heatsink isn't perfectly mounted?


weird how the cpu still get in the 60s but I guess that would do for now since I do not know how to touch bios etc. Thanks btw.
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