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Linux Ubuntu 13.04 does not appear as an option on Windows 7 dual booting

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September 15, 2013 2:41:22 PM

So, I'm trying to dual boot Linux Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows 7 Home Premium. I have 2 hard drives: a 1 TB 7200RPM drive, and a 2 TB 7200RPM drive. The 1 TB drive is partitioned in half, and the 2 TB drive has one main partition (about 1.8TB), and one 150GB partition. Windows 7 is installed on one partition of the 1TB drive, and Linux is installed on the 150GB partition on the 2 TB drive.

My issue is that, even though Linux Ubuntu is installed on that 150GB partition, it does not appear as a boot option on the Windows (I assume it's from Windows) dual boot menu. All that shows up is Windows 7 (the main installation) and Windows 7 (a temporary installation from when my computer crashed that I have not removed yet). If I open up the Linux Ubuntu installation again (from a bootable USB stick) and look at the partitions, it does show the current Linux installation as "Ubuntu 13.04".

I've heard that I need to modify Windows 7's boot.ini file for it to show up as a boot option, but I don't know how to do that.

Anyone know what to do?

Thanks! Let me know if any more information is needed.
a b $ Windows 7
September 15, 2013 2:53:40 PM

TheQuack45 said:
So, I'm trying to dual boot Linux Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows 7 Home Premium. I have 2 hard drives: a 1 TB 7200RPM drive, and a 2 TB 7200RPM drive. The 1 TB drive is partitioned in half, and the 2 TB drive has one main partition (about 1.8TB), and one 150GB partition. Windows 7 is installed on one partition of the 1TB drive, and Linux is installed on the 150GB partition on the 2 TB drive.

My issue is that, even though Linux Ubuntu is installed on that 150GB partition, it does not appear as a boot option on the Windows (I assume it's from Windows) dual boot menu. All that shows up is Windows 7 (the main installation) and Windows 7 (a temporary installation from when my computer crashed that I have not removed yet). If I open up the Linux Ubuntu installation again (from a bootable USB stick) and look at the partitions, it does show the current Linux installation as "Ubuntu 13.04".

I've heard that I need to modify Windows 7's boot.ini file for it to show up as a boot option, but I don't know how to do that.

Anyone know what to do?

Thanks! Let me know if any more information is needed.


When you install Linux, it usually installs its own bootloader, which gives the option to either boot Linux or Windows if it detects it. This bootloader may have been put on your 2 TB drive, instead of the 1 TB drive that Windows is installed on. As far as Windows is concerned, all that is installed on your computer is the 2 Windows 7 installs.

I just installed OpenSUSE 12.3 on my desktop, and now I have to change the boot order to the older 80 GB drive I am using for it, so I can get the option to dual-boot.

Have you tried booting to the 2 TB drive?

Casey

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September 15, 2013 3:00:21 PM

cklaubur said:


When you install Linux, it usually installs its own bootloader, which gives the option to either boot Linux or Windows if it detects it. This bootloader may have been put on your 2 TB drive, instead of the 1 TB drive that Windows is installed on. As far as Windows is concerned, all that is installed on your computer is the 2 Windows 7 installs.

I just installed OpenSUSE 12.3 on my desktop, and now I have to change the boot order to the older 80 GB drive I am using for it, so I can get the option to dual-boot.

Have you tried booting to the 2 TB drive?

Casey



I haven't fully tried booting to the 2 TB drive, as it does not appear as a boot option in BIOS. (I have an Asus P8Z77 V-LX, it has UEFI BIOS) The only way it appears is the Windows 7 installation on the 2 TB drive, which doesn't work as I have deleted the Windows folder of that (Haven't gotten around to completely deleting it, as I have to give myself permissions for each folder, and I don't have time for that.)
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a b 5 Linux
a b $ Windows 7
September 16, 2013 1:00:03 AM

TheQuack45 said:
So, I'm trying to dual boot Linux Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows 7 Home Premium. I have 2 hard drives: a 1 TB 7200RPM drive, and a 2 TB 7200RPM drive. The 1 TB drive is partitioned in half, and the 2 TB drive has one main partition (about 1.8TB), and one 150GB partition. Windows 7 is installed on one partition of the 1TB drive, and Linux is installed on the 150GB partition on the 2 TB drive.

My issue is that, even though Linux Ubuntu is installed on that 150GB partition, it does not appear as a boot option on the Windows (I assume it's from Windows) dual boot menu. All that shows up is Windows 7 (the main installation) and Windows 7 (a temporary installation from when my computer crashed that I have not removed yet). If I open up the Linux Ubuntu installation again (from a bootable USB stick) and look at the partitions, it does show the current Linux installation as "Ubuntu 13.04".

I've heard that I need to modify Windows 7's boot.ini file for it to show up as a boot option, but I don't know how to do that.

Anyone know what to do?

Thanks! Let me know if any more information is needed.


Windows isn't very friendly about accepting that other systems exist.

Go to https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair for info on installing Boot-repair to your Ubuntu install medium or you could just download the iso and burn it to a cd.

Either way, run boot-repair and you should be good to go.
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a b 5 Linux
a b $ Windows 7
September 16, 2013 11:56:29 AM

You can edit native Windows boot menu either with Windows commands (bootcfg.exe - cumbersome and not user-friendly), or with a took like EasyBCD.

About your partitioning: Some BIOSes might have trouble booting your Linux install this 150gb partition is at the end of your 2TB disk.
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