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Lights, fans, no action. Frustrating no POST fresh build.

Tags:
  • Rosewill
  • New Build
  • Systems
  • MSI
  • Intel
Last response: in Systems
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September 17, 2013 6:29:18 PM

Hello all,

I've been very impressed by the level of expertise and willingness to help on this site so I thought I'd give my problem a shot here. I'll try to keep things concise. This is a fresh build! I should point out I have definitely read through the POST problem sticky.

The symptoms:
-No post/no display
-No beeps with speaker installed
-MB lights are on, all fans spin.
-System remains on for about 30 seconds, then reboots and stays on indefinitely.

The build:
(Since I cannot get a POST even while breadboarding, I will omit anything not involved there unless it turns out it needs to be known.)
-MSI Z87-G45 Gaming LGA 1150 Z87 Motherboard
-Intel Core i5 4670k Haswell 3.4Ghz LGA 1150
-Rosewill HIVE Series HIVE-750 750W PSU
-Various DDR3 RAM sticks were tested including Hynix 2GB @ 1600, Samsung 8GB @ 1333,
Nanya 4GB @ 1333, Elpida 4GB @ 1333.

What I've done:
1. The motherboard has been RMA'd, so this is the second one, it's having exactly the same issues.
2. Right now I'm breadboarding the thing, with nothing but the PSU/CPU/HSF/One DIMM (in various spots/configurations, I have also tried with 2 & 4 DIMMs in).
3. Has been tested with a known working 520W PSU with the same results.
4. CPU and socket examined for bent pins, none there.
5. Have tried turning on MB by shorting pins to eliminate front panel issues, same results.

Important Notes:
-None of the RAM I tried was explicitly listed as being supported by this MB, this is the biggest question mark, since I am unsure of just how significant using supported RAM is, especially when the motherboard should, as far as I know, be able to utilize the RAM I'm throwing at it.
-At this point the MB has never been inside the case at all, and is being tested on the anti-static bag it came in, I'd like to think I can rule out static damage.

Any fresh ideas would be most welcome, this whole process has just been emotionally draining. I don't want to give up building PCs but this is pushing me towards that direction. :( 

More about : lights fans action frustrating post fresh build

September 17, 2013 6:51:29 PM

Hey there,

Im no expert in this area, however i got all these symptoms when i stupidly forgot to mount my standoffs, resulting in the mothoboard frying. Now i know that your breadboarding it, however i suggest checking theres no metal material around the area which could be causing this. I fixed mine by puchasing another mobo, it worked perfectly after that. The other possibility is the proccessor has been fried which would mean you need to get another CPU, don't go for my word, just trying to provide you with my experiences.
All in all i suggest you reset the CMOS if you havent already, try this link to see how its done:
http://www.wikihow.com/Reset-Your-BIOS
If this doesnt help, then all i say is good luck man.
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September 17, 2013 7:08:41 PM

Josh6517 said:
Hey there,

Im no expert in this area, however i got all these symptoms when i stupidly forgot to mount my standoffs, resulting in the mothoboard frying. Now i know that your breadboarding it, however i suggest checking theres no metal material around the area which could be causing this. I fixed mine by puchasing another mobo, it worked perfectly after that. The other possibility is the proccessor has been fried which would mean you need to get another CPU, don't go for my word, just trying to provide you with my experiences.
All in all i suggest you reset the CMOS if you havent already, try this link to see how its done:
http://www.wikihow.com/Reset-Your-BIOS
If this doesnt help, then all i say is good luck man.


I appreciate the response, but I'm sure I've taken the right steps to avoid frying the thing. Right now the only guesses at what might be the problem are either that the unsupported RAM really is causing no POST, the CPU is indeed bad (I always thought this was uncommon), or perhaps somehow the PSU damaged both motherboards through being faulty (unlikely given the results I've seen).
You bring up a point I forgot to mention - CMOS. I haven't toyed with the battery itself, but I have reset CMOS through a built in switch between configurations. Thanks though!
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September 17, 2013 7:09:38 PM

Hi there. I'm not expert built my first computer last week. In any case I think placing your parts on top of the anti-static bag is a bad idea as I read the outside of them picks up a lot of static electricity.
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September 17, 2013 7:47:17 PM

crnichm said:
I think placing your parts on top of the anti-static bag is a bad idea as I read the outside of them picks up a lot of static electricity.


I've always assumed the anti-static bag to be, well, anti-static. Does anyone know if this could actually cause a problem? At any rate, with the first mobo, I got all of the same symptoms inside the case, with the standoffs properly installed, and at that point I had not breadboarded the rig.
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September 18, 2013 11:07:59 AM

Wellexcuuuuseme said:
crnichm said:
I think placing your parts on top of the anti-static bag is a bad idea as I read the outside of them picks up a lot of static electricity.


I've always assumed the anti-static bag to be, well, anti-static. Does anyone know if this could actually cause a problem? At any rate, with the first mobo, I got all of the same symptoms inside the case, with the standoffs properly installed, and at that point I had not breadboarded the rig.


The reason that an anti-static bag works is because it is conductive! One should never use the anti-static bag as a base to test a MB as it can short out the MB and cause all sorts of problems. Use the empty MB box or some other non-conductive surface to set the MB on.

I'm not saying that this is the root cause of your issues but it IS something that you need to change!

Yogi

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September 18, 2013 11:48:34 AM

Interesting, I've seen accounts of people advocating the bag and people saying the bag is a problem. I will definitely change it out, perhaps to a piece of wood, just to be thorough. Still, as I mentioned, I'm 100% positive my standoffs are installed correctly and that I don't have too many of them, and I saw the exact same problems in the case with the first motherboard. I'll report back once I give it a shot, although I'm not feeling too optimistic about that being the solution. Thanks though!

**EDIT: Moving the mobo to the box and off the anti static bag did not change anything, unfortunately.
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September 18, 2013 2:16:55 PM

Wellexcuuuuseme said:
Interesting, I've seen accounts of people advocating the bag and people saying the bag is a problem. I will definitely change it out, perhaps to a piece of wood, just to be thorough. Still, as I mentioned, I'm 100% positive my standoffs are installed correctly and that I don't have too many of them, and I saw the exact same problems in the case with the first motherboard. I'll report back once I give it a shot, although I'm not feeling too optimistic about that being the solution. Thanks though!


I highly doubt that will solve your problem also. Since you have replaced the MB once, that leaves the PSU, the memory and the CPU. Is that Rosewill PSU certified to be Haswell compatible?

Yogi

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September 18, 2013 2:37:19 PM

Oh man, you may be on to something. The HIVE version I have actually says nothing about Haswell, I believe I may have gotten it confused with the CAPSTONE, which is Haswell ready. It also fits the bill, seeing as how the 520W working PSU I tried is older and most certainly not Haswell ready. Do you think a non-Haswell-certified would be that significant? Moreover, do you think it may have bricked the mobo? A little research indicates that Haswell-certified is not likely to be signficant (seems to be geared more towards the ability to handle the super low power state the Haswells go into when not in use), although it's the best I have to go on.
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September 18, 2013 3:22:47 PM

Wellexcuuuuseme said:
Oh man, you may be on to something. The HIVE version I have actually says nothing about Haswell, I believe I may have gotten it confused with the CAPSTONE, which is Haswell ready. It also fits the bill, seeing as how the 520W working PSU I tried is older and most certainly not Haswell ready. Do you think a non-Haswell-certified would be that significant? Moreover, do you think it may have bricked the mobo? Thanks for the insight.


You're welcome!

I highly doubt that the PSU has bricked the MB. Apparently the Haswell compatibility has more to do with LOW power demands during C7 sleep state. Here is one explanation: http://techreport.com/review/24897/the-big-haswell-psu-...
Which says in part: "Before we proceed, we should be clear about one thing: you don't, strictly speaking, need one of these "Haswell-ready" PSUs to build a Haswell system. Corsair told us that it "fully expects" motherboard makers to let users disable the new low-power power state in the firmware. Cooler Master went even further, stating that, to its knowledge, "all mainboard vendors" will disable the new low-power state in their boards by default. In other words, you may never encounter any issues even if you pair a Haswell platform with an incompatible power supply." So, Haswell compatibility problems would seem to be a long shot. I'm not saying that you can eliminate the PSU from the list of suspects, just that Haswell compatibility is not like a 'go or no go' situation. Since you have tried 2 different PSUs, I would put this down the list of suspects. So, that leaves the CPU and the memory.

Have you tried booting without any memory to see what beep codes you get, or to see if the result is any different? BTW, the preferred primary memory slots for MSI boards are #2 and #4 (counting with #1 closest to the CPU). It sounds like the memory was used memory that you had on hand (?). Is the memory that you've tried known to be good?

It may be time to RMA the CPU.

Yogi





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September 18, 2013 10:19:08 PM

Y0GI said:


Have you tried booting without any memory to see what beep codes you get, or to see if the result is any different? BTW, the preferred primary memory slots for MSI boards are #2 and #4 (counting with #1 closest to the CPU). It sounds like the memory was used memory that you had on hand (?). Is the memory that you've tried known to be good?

It may be time to RMA the CPU.



I have actually tried removing the RAM, and the mobo beeps in recognition of a memory error. Unfortunately I can't confirm the RAM to be good, but I can say that of the 4 brands I tried, 3 of them were brand new - so I can't be 100%, but chances are on my side in that particular area. I've also played with configuration there, always starting with #2 and #4. Barring some major breakthrough, I'll be RMAing something soon, I just don't know if I should RMA the mobo, psu, and cpu together, or take a chance on the CPU being the culprit - since it seems to be all that's left.
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Best solution

September 26, 2013 2:48:55 PM

I'm happy to report the issue has been solved, and naturally in finding the solution I feel stupid and am kicking myself. Coincidentally, all the RAM I was trying is ECC ram. As soon as I popped in some non-ECC RAM, it booted up and is now working just fine. Hopefully this helps someone down the road.
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September 26, 2013 3:00:52 PM

Wellexcuuuuseme said:
I'm happy to report the issue has been solved, and naturally in finding the solution I feel stupid and am kicking myself. Coincidentally, all the RAM I was trying is ECC ram. As soon as I popped in some non-ECC RAM, it booted up and is now working just fine. Hopefully this helps someone down the road.


Glad to hear that you got it worked out!

Thanks for posting the solution!

Yogi

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