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I installed a Pentium4 Extreme Edition 3.40 GHZ ,socket 478 into a dimension 3000. Now it is slower than before. I updated the

Tring to get alittle more speed out of an old computer
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  1. Best answer
    beubeu said:
    Tring to get alittle more speed out of an old computer


    You tried to type your question into the "title" field and it got cut off.

    From what I can tell the new CPU should be compatible with the computer, since you mentioned Socket 478 and there are only two Pentium 4 Extreme Editions for Socket 478, a 3.2 GHz and a 3.4 GHz unit. The Dimension 3000 according to Dell's website supports 800 MHz FSB CPUs like your P4 3.4EE so it should be running at full speed. The only thing I'd look for in the BIOS would be to make sure the CPU isn't overheating (it would throttle and slow down) and to make sure the CPU is in fact running at its full 3.40 GHz/ 800 MHz FSB setting. Other that that, if it's slower, it probably isn't the CPU.
  2. MU_Engineer said:
    beubeu said:
    Tring to get alittle more speed out of an old computer

    Yeah That was my first post so I didn't type stuff where it was supposed to go. I got the latest Bios update from Dell, but me thinks that was for the old CPU. Where would I get an Bios update for the P4 3.4EE?
    You tried to type your question into the "title" field and it got cut off.

    From what I can tell the new CPU should be compatible with the computer, since you mentioned Socket 478 and there are only two Pentium 4 Extreme Editions for Socket 478, a 3.2 GHz and a 3.4 GHz unit. The Dimension 3000 according to Dell's website supports 800 MHz FSB CPUs like your P4 3.4EE so it should be running at full speed. The only thing I'd look for in the BIOS would be to make sure the CPU isn't overheating (it would throttle and slow down) and to make sure the CPU is in fact running at its full 3.40 GHz/ 800 MHz FSB setting. Other that that, if it's slower, it probably isn't the CPU.
  3. beubeu said:

    Yeah That was my first post so I didn't type stuff where it was supposed to go. I got the latest Bios update from Dell, but me thinks that was for the old CPU. Where would I get an Bios update for the P4 3.4EE?



    If the CPU boots, its BIOS is probably compatible. I can't tell exactly if the P4EE is supported or not but the latest BIOS is here.
  4. MU_Engineer said:
    beubeu said:

    Yeah That was my first post so I didn't type stuff where it was supposed to go. I got the latest Bios update from Dell, but me thinks that was for the old CPU. Where would I get an Bios update for the P4 3.4EE?



    If the CPU boots, its BIOS is probably compatible. I can't tell exactly if the P4EE is supported or not but the latest BIOS is here.


    Thanks for the intel, A03 is what I have. Maybe it's just Win XP but it is really slow runing programs. I timed it Starting up (120 sec) and shuting down (34 sec ).
  5. Boot times are largely a function of the disk the OS sits on as well as how much RAM you have and how many startup programs you have. Shutdown times are a combination of that and how long the OS decides to give still-running programs/services to self-terminate before it kills them. The Dimension 3000 is a nearly 10 year old machine and likely loaded with PATA hard drives and probably has a TON of crap accumulated if you haven't reinstalled the OS many times since the computer was new. If you really want to see it go faster, put in 4 GB of RAM, a SATA controller card, and an SSD.
  6. MU_Engineer said:
    Boot times are largely a function of the disk the OS sits on as well as how much RAM you have and how many startup programs you have. Shutdown times are a combination of that and how long the OS decides to give still-running programs/services to self-terminate before it kills them. The Dimension 3000 is a nearly 10 year old machine and likely loaded with PATA hard drives and probably has a TON of crap accumulated if you haven't reinstalled the OS many times since the computer was new. If you really want to see it go faster, put in 4 GB of RAM, a SATA controller card, and an SSD.


    Thats what I'm talking about!! And just what I was thinking but I didn't know if the mobo would support the SSD or the extra Ram.I know SATA is the type of conection and from what I have read this computer used ATA devices. So you are saying that this SATA controll card will work with the mobo
  7. beubeu said:
    [

    Thats what I'm talking about!! And just what I was thinking but I didn't know if the mobo would support the SSD or the extra Ram.I know SATA is the type of conection and from what I have read this computer used ATA devices. So you are saying that this SATA controll card will work with the mobo


    I looked at the specs and your computer has only two memory slots, so your maximum RAM is two 1 GB modules. There are three PCI slots and you can stick a PCI SATA controller card in one, but I am not sure if you can boot from it. You need a BIOS which can boot from add-in cards and I do not see this option in the BIOS menu listed in the service guide for your computer. It might work, it might not.

    Anyway, this is a good example of how OEM computers are hard to work with and hard to upgrade. Your best option at this point would be to sell the P4EE and to get a much faster new computer with enough RAM and the right set of interfaces for modern parts. Even a piddly little LGA1150 Celeron is going to be much, much faster than the P4EE, support more than enough RAM (and 64 bit operation, which the P4EE does not), and let you use an SSD easily.
  8. MU_Engineer said:
    beubeu said:
    [

    Thats what I'm talking about!! And just what I was thinking but I didn't know if the mobo would support the SSD or the extra Ram.I know SATA is the type of conection and from what I have read this computer used ATA devices. So you are saying that this SATA controll card will work with the mobo


    I looked at the specs and your computer has only two memory slots, so your maximum RAM is two 1 GB modules. There are three PCI slots and you can stick a PCI SATA controller card in one, but I am not sure if you can boot from it. You need a BIOS which can boot from add-in cards and I do not see this option in the BIOS menu listed in the service guide for your computer. It might work, it might not.

    Anyway, this is a good example of how OEM computers are hard to work with and hard to upgrade. Your best option at this point would be to sell the P4EE and to get a much faster new computer with enough RAM and the right set of interfaces for modern parts. Even a piddly little LGA1150 Celeron is going to be much, much faster than the P4EE, support more than enough RAM (and 64 bit operation, which the P4EE does not), and let you use an SSD easily.

    Thank you guy,

    I,ve been an elevator mechanic for 30yrs and have always had to fix old crap with new or rebuilt parts.I just thought I could do that here. But I do under stand the limitations here ,Just lack the formal training and experence of messin' with this stuff. So basiclly I be back to Plan A ,gut the case and start over with modern parts. OH I am not using this computer as a gamer just for code books, inspection books, but mostly to see if I could build this thing
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