Solved

Best RAM for Intel Core i7 4770k

Hello! I'm planning to build a system which uses the intel core i7 4770k processer. What do you guys think the best RAM for them? For gaming specifically. And if it's possible, what are the numbers on the ram like MHz mean too? hahah thanks a bunch
35 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about ram intel core 4770k
  1. Best answer
    Ram compatibility is associated with the motherboard, not the cpu.

    You want documented ram compatibility. If you should ever have a problem, you want supported ram.
    Otherwise, you risk a finger pointing battle between the ram and motherboard support sites, claiming "not my problem".
    One place to check is your motherboards web site.
    Look for the ram QVL list. It lists all of the ram kits that have been tested with that particular motherboard.
    Sometimes the QVL list is not updated after the motherboard is released.
    For more current info, go to a ram vendor's web site and access their ram selection configurator.
    Enter your motherboard, and you will get a list of compatible ram kits.
    While today's motherboards are more tolerant of different ram, it makes sense to buy ram that is known to work and is supported.

    The MHz numbers refer to speed. The cas numbers refer to the delay before getting up to that speed.
    The higher the speed, the higher the delay(cas) so they somewhat offset each other.

    Ultimately the speed of the ram past 1600 has not that much effect on real app performance or fps(vs. synthetic benchmarks) on intel platforms.
    Read this: http://www.anandtech.com/show/4503/sandy-bridge-memory-scaling-choosing-the-best-ddr3

    For just gaming, 8gb is the sweet spot. But, since ram is cheap, I would buy 16gb. Windows keeps more code in ram available for instant reuse.

    I would look for a 16gb kit(2 x 8gb) of 1600 or 1866 low profile ram.
    High heat spreaders are not useful and can impact many cpu coolers.
  2. Corsair Vengeance Pro Series is a great RAM, especially optimized for Intel Haswell.
  3. Wow, really appreciate for the well detailed answer geofelt. Thank you so much!
    Does the size of the RAM eg: (8gb,16gb,32gb) affects the flow of the OS?
    And maybe ill be using the Asus Maximus VI Hero for these RAMs. It'll sure be compatible yes?
  4. Basicall for gaming 1600/1866 is fine, and 8GB is sufficient, look for 1600/8 or 1866/9 (either in 1.5 volt) or better in 2x4GB so can use dual channel - as far what DRAM, basically any, QVLs from mobo manufacturers are pretty worthess, they 'test' at the mobo default, generally 1333/1600 regardless of DRAM spec, so if you see 2400 on the list, yes it may work, but only at 1333 or 1600 (more on QVLs here:

    http://www.gskill.us/forum/showthread.php?t=10566

    MHz is the effective freq of the DRAM or how fast it runs, I say effective because the true freq is half of what's advertised since this is DDR - DOUBLE DATA RATE you take the true freq (say 800) times 2 to get the effective of advertised freq of 1600.

    With the Haswell CPUs, I've found the GSkill Tridents to be best, followed by the GSkill Snipers
  5. For that processor 12 GB is more than enough

    1600mhz or above will do

    and use the rest money to buy a ssd or better drive
  6. You don't want a 12GB GB set, that's 3x4GB and it's in a dual channel mobo, which would end up with 8GB running in dual channel and the odd 4 in single channel, which is extra stain on the MC (memory controller), either 8GB in a 2x4GB or 16GB in a 2x8GB
  7. I seee! So what's the difference if you have 2x4gb and 2x8gb tradesman? Is it speed performance?
  8. It's simply the amount of the DRAM, there was a suggestion for 12GB above, which makes no sense, so was clarifying either 8GB or 16GB....I favor higher amounts of DRAM which can speed up overall system, but if for strictly gaming, 8GB is more than sufficient for most....if you do go with the Hero (that's what I built my Haswell on (in sig), it loves high freq and large amounts, know whenever I drop to 8GB or 1600 sticks, it starts to feel like it's crawling ;) High freq sticks definitely make a difference if one really uses their rig
  9. Tradsman1,

    Thanks for the info. I am new to building a PC and its my first time. So can u suggest that I am picking right ram or is higher frequency is better and how much. I am using this parts to build.
    Core i7 4770k
    Asus Z87-Expert
    Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory
    And what better for this board 2x8GB or 4x4GB modules? Is there any impact if I go for 1866 or 2000? I am going to use this for gaming.
  10. Nice mobo, good choice, if looking to 16GB, best to look at at a 2x8GB set, two sticks is less stress on the MC (memory controller) than 4 and ever so slightly faster. Haswell scales to RAM better than previous Intel CPUs so would suggest either 1866 or 2133, will see some gains in gaming from the wider bandwidth and larger gains in new games as the developers utilize DRAM more, i.e. BF4 while still primarily dependent on GPU performance wise also gears up more with better CPUs and DRAM
  11. AMDRadeonHD said:
    Corsair Vengeance Pro Series is a great RAM, especially optimized for Intel Haswell.


    Tradesman1 said:
    Nice mobo, good choice, if looking to 16GB, best to look at at a 2x8GB set, two sticks is less stress on the MC (memory controller) than 4 and ever so slightly faster. Haswell scales to RAM better than previous Intel CPUs so would suggest either 1866 or 2133, will see some gains in gaming from the wider bandwidth and larger gains in new games as the developers utilize DRAM more, i.e. BF4 while still primarily dependent on GPU performance wise also gears up more with better CPUs and DRAM


    Thanks for the suggestion. I check the QVL of Asus Z87 - Expert but I cannot find any Corsair Vengeance Pro in this list. They give the list only with Vendor and Part number not the series, so what should I check to select the RAM? Although Corsair specifically said that this series is specially build for 3rd and 4th generation processors. Any suggestion ?
  12. To be honest QVLs are pretty worthless, see why here:

    http://www.gskill.us/forum/showthread.php?t=10566

    For Haswell, best I've used have been the GSkill Tridents followed by the Snipers - have used a variety of both on a large variey of mobos, (Assu, the Rock and GB)
  13. Thanks for the reply. I select this RAM just because I used Corsair before and I like its heat sink and size of it.

    http://http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233536

    Whats your thoughts?
  14. Those should work fine ;)
  15. Hi can anybody suggest between these two. The price is same on Newegg and I am planning to run it on Asus Z87-Expert.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231623

    DDR3 1866 (PC3 14900)
    Timing 8-9-9-24
    Cas Latency 8
    Voltage 1.6V

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231589

    DDR3 2400 (PC3 19200)
    Timing 10-12-12-31
    Cas Latency 10
    Voltage 1.65V
  16. Between those two the 2400 will offer far more bandwidth, and think you'll like them better, have that in it's 32GB set in my IB and they are great, also have OC headroom and with your CPU should prob be able to run them at 2666 if so desired
  17. Thanks for your reply. What about the timing. Is the difference in timings of both rams have any impact because 1866 is better timing according to my knowledge but 2400 have better speed Is there any difference if i run both on stock speed. I forgot to mention the board which is ASUS Z87 - Expert. Kindly suggest. And what about the configuration is it user friendly or easy?
  18. Contrary to the (2) popular beliefs (many say say high freq and CL be ignored - others say low CL and freq doesn't matter), neither one is correct, to get best performance it takes a combination of the the highest freq paired with the lowest CL - true performance sticks will normally be rated

    1600/7 1866/8 2133/9 2400/10 2666/11 2800/12 at any of the freqs and with a higher CL say 1600/9 tou are looking at entry level for that freq and a higher CL should be completely ignored like 1600/10 or 1600/11 (which should be cheap) performance wise better off with say 1333/8 or 9
  19. So which one is better in performance and stability according to my board, if I want to run it on stock speed and not overclock. I didn't overclock before so I am not aware of its basics. I am confuse, why they are selling those two on same price :).
  20. If not going to OC then go w/ the 1866 set, no need to waste money, and you have selected a very good mobo - you'll be pleased w/ it
  21. On Newegg listing price is same for both.
  22. Then can go with the faster and run them as high as they will go and have more overhead for the future
  23. So based on this, would 1600 CAS7 or 1866 CAS8 perform best?
  24. In the mentioned pairs the 1866 will be a bit better performance wise with the wider bandwidth
  25. RAM for the Haswell 4770K

    Someone said that RAM is dependent on the motherboard and not the CPU. That is only HALF RIGHT. But half right implies half wrong.

    I built a system two and a half years ago with an Intel i5. I ALMOST bought the wrong RAM. Based on the mother board ALONE I could have used RAM with voltage any where from 1.5 to 1.65 volts. When it comes to overclocking the higher voltage is usually better.

    However, at the last moment I went to Intel's website and it recommended 1.5 volt RAM !! So I contacted Intel Tech Support and spoke a tech directly. He told me personally that anything over 1.5 volts could be hazardous to THAT particular CPU, and in some cases you could even VOID THE WARRANTY by using the wrong RAM. When you are paying $300 or more for a 4770k you certainly want to be careful that you do NOT either damage your investment or void the warranty.

    That said I am planning on building a new system with the 4770k chip, I still have not figured out which would be the best RAM for it? Intel recommends DDR3 1333/1600...

    I am wondering if you finished building your system what did you use and how is it working out for you??
  26. Yep welcome to the wonderful world of Intel, often wonder if the left and right hands there ever have a clue what the other is doing - Think about about it, they have long said they DON't support overclocking their CPUs - YET...they go out of their way to make K models (unlocked) of many CPUs, and in some instances mention/tout the OC ability.. They also say no DRAM over 1600 or 1.65, yet they go out of their way to test and certify DRAM for their CPUs clear up to 3000 sticks and 1.65, they're almost getting as bad as AMD with the say something then turn and look the other way
  27. Tradesman1 said:
    It's simply the amount of the DRAM, there was a suggestion for 12GB above, which makes no sense, so was clarifying either 8GB or 16GB....I favor higher amounts of DRAM which can speed up overall system, but if for strictly gaming, 8GB is more than sufficient for most....if you do go with the Hero (that's what I built my Haswell on (in sig), it loves high freq and large amounts, know whenever I drop to 8GB or 1600 sticks, it starts to feel like it's crawling ;) High freq sticks definitely make a difference if one really uses their rig


    Hi Tradesman, I ALWAYS appreciate 'experience' over theory and I see that you have built a system with the Haswell 4770k so appreciate your advise.

    I posted an entry about a system I built 2.5 years where a tech guy from Intel told me to make SURE I used RAM that was 1.5v and NOT 1.6-1.65 voltage. So I commented that going by the mobo specs alone is not enough, because my motherboard could have used ANY RAM from 1.5v to 1.65v, but NOT according to Intel

    Intel on this chip recommends DDR3-1333/1600 but makes no mention of the voltage. Since most RAM today is 1.5v that is what I am going with. However, it seems you went as high as 2666 on yours and said that 8GB and 1600 seems like it is crawling. I was wondering have you done any benchmarking on the different RAMs?

    I was planning on starting with 8GB, 1600, 1.5v, dual channel and then adding another 8GB later, since my income is limited (retired). However, with your suggestion I may well go much higher in speed. I bought a MSi GD65 Gaming board and it can use any RAM from 1333 all the way up to 3000.

    I considered the Rampage VI but it would not fit into my budge. The MSi GD65 is geared for overclocking and has numerous extra features for doing so and even for testing your setup like an Onboard Power Switch, a 2 digit LED POST reader, a 1 Button OC Genie, Dual Bios, Audio Boost, Killer Ethernet, and more.

    Any way bottom line, do you still consider the G.Skill Trident 2666 the best for the 4770k, Thanks Ron
  28. You can go even higher if the pockets are full, mine aren't ;) When I got my 2666 set they were right at $900, and the 2800 set was running about $1,700... I think they are great sticks, right now prices are great on the 2400/10 Tridents and again I think well worth it, as far as people being able to tell a difference (and a lot of clients will ask) one thing I love to do is have a client sit at a rig (sometimes the same exact one and do his/her thing - open a bunch of Windows, apps, maybe do some rendering with video, imaging, CAD, whatever they do, then I'll swap out DRAM with another set - may be the faster sticks or may be down to whatever they originally wanted (1866 is most common) then ask which they way they liked the system better - while they never know what I've done (changes wise) over 85% of the time they pick the setup that had the higher freq DRAM and more often than not might ask how high I OCed the CPU, when they find it was just the DRAM - they want the faster DRAM....

    As far as Intel goes - it would be nice if any of them paid attention to what the rest of Intel is doing - they say they don't support OCing - yet specifically make CPUs that are made to be OCed - i.e. why have a 4770K with and unlocked CPU if you 'DON'T SUPPORT OCing???? Liek with you their CS folks tell people all the time - DON'T USE HIGHER THAN 1600 RAM and HIGHER that 1.5 - yet they test and certify DRAM for their CPUs at up to 3000 and 1.65 (and they charge the DRAM makers to test/certify said DRAM

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/xmp-for-core-processors.html
  29. Tradesman1 said:

    As far as Intel goes - it would be nice if any of them paid attention to what the rest of Intel is doing - they say they don't support OCing - yet specifically make CPUs that are made to be OCed - i.e. why have a 4770K with and unlocked CPU if you 'DON'T SUPPORT OCing???? Liek with you their CS folks tell people all the time - DON'T USE HIGHER THAN 1600 RAM and HIGHER that 1.5 - yet they test and certify DRAM for their CPUs at up to 3000 and 1.65 (and they charge the DRAM makers to test/certify said DRAM

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/xmp-for-core-processors.html



    Hi Tradesman, I agree with your assessment, "if any of them paid attention to what the rest of Intel is doing..." I kind of thought that was the problem when I got my information from them 2.5 years ago, that the guy was JUST telling me their "PUBLIC" policy and not the whole truth. Based on what everyone else was saying 1.6-1.65 should have worked out fine.

    I went to the link that you included but it was certainly lacking for the mobo I bought? They had RAM certified for this board but ONLY the GD65 using the LGA 2011 and LGA 1155 processors! NOTHING for the Z87 LGA 1150?
    Any idea where else I can go to get information about WHICH RAM has been certified for the MSi Z87-GD65?
    I tried G.Skill but their website seems OVER the top. They showed me LOTS of RAM that WOULD work but did not say if any were certified, nor did they suggest which would be the best?

    I have everything to start my build except the RAM! THANKS in Advance, Ron
  30. Intel charges to certify the DRAM, both mobo manufacturers and DRAM manufacturers test, basically on a time available basis and there's little gotcha's from the Mobo makers, see here:

    http://www.gskill.us/forum/showthread.php?t=10566

    Glad you mentioned GSkill, have worked closely w/ them for a few years now, and they actually test the compatibility at the rated spec of the DRAM, it's not just boot to the mobos default of 1333 or 1600 and if it boots OK they say these are fine. GSKill enables XMP, DOSCP, EOCP, etc and makes sure it works at full freq on the given mobo, it's normally done with a high end CPU, so still need to be aware the CPU plays a lot into whether DRAM can run at full freq or not and how much the rig will be able to handle - just because the mobo (we'll use the MSI Z87-GD65 as an example since you mention it) - now it advertises 32GB and 2800 as tops (not that many will rush out and buy 32GB of 2800 at $1,200, but there are some with pockets deep enough) , but I digress, realistically a 4670K should be able to run 32GB of 2400, maybe 2666, or should run 16GB of 2666 and 8 GB of 2800 (maybe 16), the 4770K on the other hand can generally handle 32GB of 2666 and possibly 2800, or 16GB of 2800 and might even be able to push 8 or 16GB of 3000 (though at 3000, you'll want to be good (probably very good) with DRAM, since they only show support to 2800, the BIOS prob won't be ready to set up 3000 sticks, so will need to be able to set up the advanced/secondary timings in addition the the base timings (and with MSI, may even have to be able to do that with 2800 sticks)......mobo makers are constantly updating the BIOS's and the buldk of most updates (though seldom ever advertised) are generally made up of updates for various DRAM compatibility problems.
  31. what you guys think of this for my build, (its my first PC build)
    Asus sabertooth Z87
    i7 4770K
    Gskill Trident X Series 32GB (4 x 8GB) 2800MHz C11-13-13-35 @ 1.65v
  32. or should i go with this since its my first build

    [RipjawsX] F3-14900CL10D-16GBXL
    DDR3-1866 (PC3-14900)
    16GB (8GBx2)
    CL10-11-10-30
    1.50 Volt
  33. What will you be using the rig for?
  34. Tradesman, I can not figure HOW to write you so I am putting this in a thread, where we discussed this before??

    I went with your recommendation of G.Skill Trident. I got the Trident X in 2400 MHz and in 2 sticks of 8 GB each, for a total of 16 GB. At first they were reported at 1333 MHz but then I changed to bios to XMP and then they showed 2400 MHz. And everything went perfect for almost 6 weeks.

    Yesterday I started getting freezes and BSODs. The freezes would last only a few seconds and then reboot. The third time it happened my bios was reset. It said something like, 'due to an error your overclocking was reset to default'. Well I had not done ANY overclocking, unless setting the dram to XMP is considered overclocking??

    So now my RAM is being reported as 1333 MHz, and I CANNOT find WHERE I set the RAM to XMP. I have an MSi Z87-GD65 has overclocking features and I know that it was in the OVERCLOCKING section that I changed it to XMP, but I do NOT FIND IT NOW?? Is it possible the ability to set XPM would be disabled?

    Also this Trident was also originally at 1.65 volts and now it is reporting it at 1.5- something volts?

    Thanks, Ron

    *********************************
    Tradesman1 said:
    Basicall for gaming 1600/1866 is fine, and 8GB is sufficient, look for 1600/8 or 1866/9 (either in 1.5 volt) or better in 2x4GB so can use dual channel - as far what DRAM, basically any, QVLs from mobo manufacturers are pretty worthess, they 'test' at the mobo default, generally 1333/1600 regardless of DRAM spec, so if you see 2400 on the list, yes it may work, but only at 1333 or 1600 (more on QVLs here:

    http://www.gskill.us/forum/showthread.php?t=10566

    MHz is the effective freq of the DRAM or how fast it runs, I say effective because the true freq is half of what's advertised since this is DDR - DOUBLE DATA RATE you take the true freq (say 800) times 2 to get the effective of advertised freq of 1600.

    With the Haswell CPUs, I've found the GSkill Tridents to be best, followed by the GSkill Snipers


    Tradesman1 said:
    What will you be using the rig for?
  35. Should be in the advanced section, under Extreme Memory Profile, on page 3-18 of the manual - options are DISABLE - Profile1 or Profile2 select Profile1
Ask a new question

Read More

RAM Intel i7 Intel Memory