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ubuntu on pentium 4 2.8GHz, 2GB DDR1 RAM, 2GB DDR3 Radeon HD 5450 Graphics card

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September 23, 2013 7:47:33 AM

I have an old PC with
CPU: Pentium 4 511 (2.8GHz)
GPU: Radeon HD 5450 2GB
RAM: 2GB DDR1-400MHz
Mobo: Intel D101GGC
HDD: 80 GB.

Is it appropriate to install ubuntu 13.04 64 bit in it? Will it run fluid?

More about : ubuntu pentium 8ghz 2gb ddr1 ram 2gb ddr3 radeon 5450 graphics card

September 23, 2013 8:12:17 AM

It will run. As for how fluid it depends on what you want to do with it and what you have running. If you're just going to use the default UI and do some desktop applications it should be fine. Heavy development not so much :D . There are lighter alternatives like xbuntu which would perform faster on older systems

http://xubuntu.org/
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September 23, 2013 9:38:44 AM

With just 2GB of RAM, isntalling 64-bit version does not make sense. Save youselves some troubles down the road, and get 32-bit (x86) version!
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September 24, 2013 2:09:45 AM

I don't think ubuntu would suck as much RAM as Windows 7 does. So, that's why I think 2 GB would be enough even for x64 version. (Windows 7 recommends at least 2GB for 64 bit, so, for ubuntu shouldn't 2GB be ENOUGH?)
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September 24, 2013 5:55:38 AM

it not that, the point of using 64bit is because it can use more then 4GB or ram. if you going to just use 2GB 32bit would work for you.
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September 24, 2013 8:49:36 AM

For some things using 64-bit can be faster such as in image manipulation, encryption, and other data heavy or math heavy operations. That is because it allows you to move and work on 64-bits of data at a time where at least two or more 32-bit operations would be required to do the same. The only issue is that for simpler programs you're essentially doubling the memory space some variables will take up. A 32-bit var will take up a 64-bit address leaving half of it unused and especially on an old P4 such programs can run a little slower than on a 32-bit OS. The biggest thing is just the RAM usage, but again it just depends on what you're doing with it. Just install 64-bit and see how it works for you :D 
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September 24, 2013 12:19:58 PM

I'd use Xubuntu (XFCE) or Lubuntu (LXDE) or Linux Mint Mate (Gnome 2) on that hardware, simply to avoid the waste of resources that is the Unity interface which comes with Ubuntu. Should be able to have a fully functional desktop that uses 300 - 450MB RAM when idle and no need for OpenGL all the time with ones I suggested.
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September 24, 2013 7:45:17 PM

I play around with P-4's for a charity that refurbishes old PCs. For a P-4 I'd go with Lubuntu or Xubuntu. Or Mint with Xfce. All are lighter and faster than Ubuntu these days. But you still have access to the large Ubuntu free program repositories and also the wide-based community support.

If you want speed and dont mind a slighlty more primitive interface, try Puppy. Puppy's a bit more geeky but runs VERY fast even on old P-4's.

Best of luck.
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September 27, 2013 7:25:59 AM

Thanks for all your replies. Currently the x64 version runs good. I'd give it 70/100. The RAM is generally 60% occupied when I'm browsing the internet with several tabs. And, somewhat like 80% when I'm playing music, browsing the web and updating the OS.

But, one thing is still there. I don't know whether I've installed the correct driver of my graphics card or not. This is what my current state is:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/...
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September 27, 2013 9:38:13 PM

nmakes said:
Thanks for all your replies. Currently the x64 version runs good. I'd give it 70/100. The RAM is generally 60% occupied when I'm browsing the internet with several tabs. And, somewhat like 80% when I'm playing music, browsing the web and updating the OS.

But, one thing is still there. I don't know whether I've installed the correct driver of my graphics card or not. This is what my current state is:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/...


You are correct, it's using the VESA driver rather than the open source AMD fglrx driver. VESA is not accelerated, which can cause visual tearing and slowness when moving windows around the screen. Have a look here for some help installing the open source driver here,

http://askubuntu.com/questions/217937/how-to-install-am...

Alternately you can install the AMD proprietary drivers,

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BinaryDriverHowto/ATI

For gaming it's probably worth it to install the proprietary driver otherwise the open source one will work well for smoothing out desktop stuff.
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September 28, 2013 8:02:44 PM

First things first. What is VESA driver?

I downloaded the driver from AMD's site. It was the 13.8 BETA Driver. Then after installing it shows the VESA:CEDAR thing. Before that, it had the option for fglrx driver in Updates app. When I selected it and clicked apply, it would take a lot of time (about 2 minutes) to do that and then once I close it, it would switch back to default. How do I tackle it?
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