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Graphics Card/Mother Board Issue

Tags:
  • Computers
  • Graphics Cards
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
September 23, 2013 5:41:20 PM

A little while back my girlfriend ran into a problem with her computer where she stopped getting any sort of display from her card. So I tried to help her out. Upon boot the cards fans spin and the computer starts up normally, with that info I tried to reseat the card in a different slot and reseated the RAM and still nothing. I then tried to plug it into my rig and didn't get any result (still nothing displaying). When I plugged my card back in I suddenly had the same problem where I can't get anything to display. We even bought a brand new card and new PSU, and still nothing. Could her old card had a short that caused a short in the PCIe slots?

Her Rig:

PowerColor AX6790 1GBD5-DH Radeon HD 6790
GIGABYTE GA-970A-UD3 AM3+ AMD 970
AMD FX-4170 Zambezi 4.2GHz
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB)
COOLER MASTER eXtreme Power Plus RS500-PCARD3-US 500W

My Rig:

XFX Double D FX-785A-CDFC Radeon HD 7850
GIGABYTE GA-990FXA-UD7 AM3+ AMD 990FX
AMD FX-8320 EIGHT-CORE 3.5GHZ
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB)
CORSAIR HX Series HX850 850W

New parts:

XFX Double D FX-795A-TDKC Radeon HD 7950 Black Edition
CORSAIR HX Series HX750 750W

More about : graphics card mother board issue

a c 785 V Motherboard
a c 327 U Graphics card
September 23, 2013 5:50:19 PM

If tHe card has a short the mb may gone into protection mode. On some mb you have to clear the CMOS to clear a dead short.
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a c 124 V Motherboard
a b U Graphics card
September 23, 2013 6:14:20 PM

Yes, it is possible for a GPU to short the motherboard. Another possibility is static electricty. Just so you know, static electricty can be present even if you don't see it.

On to some troubleshooting tips...

1. Start with one of these or discharge yourself properly by touching bare metal before opening the case

2. Clear CMOS by removing the battery for about 10 seconds, then put battery back in.

3. Completely remove the motherboard out of the case, and then place it on a non-conductive surface (like wood, newspaper, cardboard, etc.)

4. Start breadboarding your system. Use only the necessary boot items (1 RAM, HDD, CPU, & GPU if you don't have on board graphics).

5. If you can't get the system to display, swap RAM into a different DIMM slot until you've used all RAM stick in all DIMM slots.

6. If still no display, swap or add in GPU (again, only applies if you have on board graphics).

Since you've got potentially two faulty computers, try the above steps with their original hardware, and then swap the parts out if you don't get any results.

It might also be a good idea to jot down your observations.

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September 23, 2013 6:17:23 PM

smorizio said:
If tHe card has a short the mb may gone into protection mode. On some mb you have to clear the CMOS to clear a dead short.


No luck on clearing the CMOS.
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September 23, 2013 6:33:10 PM

T_T said:
Yes, it is possible for a GPU to short the motherboard. Another possibility is static electricty. Just so you know, static electricty can be present even if you don't see it.

On to some troubleshooting tips...

1. Start with one of these or discharge yourself properly by touching bare metal before opening the case

2. Clear CMOS by removing the battery for about 10 seconds, then put battery back in.

3. Completely remove the motherboard out of the case, and then place it on a non-conductive surface (like wood, newspaper, cardboard, etc.)

4. Start breadboarding your system. Use only the necessary boot items (1 RAM, HDD, CPU, & GPU if you don't have on board graphics).

5. If you can't get the system to display, swap RAM into a different DIMM slot until you've used all RAM stick in all DIMM slots.

6. If still no display, swap or add in GPU (again, only applies if you have on board graphics).

Since you've got potentially two faulty computers, try the above steps with their original hardware, and then swap the parts out if you don't get any results.

It might also be a good idea to jot down your observations.



Alright, I'll give that a shot first chance tomorrow. As for the static I have a anti-static wristband that I use any time I poke around inside the case.
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September 24, 2013 5:25:38 PM

T_T said:
Yes, it is possible for a GPU to short the motherboard. Another possibility is static electricty. Just so you know, static electricty can be present even if you don't see it.

On to some troubleshooting tips...

1. Start with one of these or discharge yourself properly by touching bare metal before opening the case

2. Clear CMOS by removing the battery for about 10 seconds, then put battery back in.

3. Completely remove the motherboard out of the case, and then place it on a non-conductive surface (like wood, newspaper, cardboard, etc.)

4. Start breadboarding your system. Use only the necessary boot items (1 RAM, HDD, CPU, & GPU if you don't have on board graphics).

5. If you can't get the system to display, swap RAM into a different DIMM slot until you've used all RAM stick in all DIMM slots.

6. If still no display, swap or add in GPU (again, only applies if you have on board graphics).

Since you've got potentially two faulty computers, try the above steps with their original hardware, and then swap the parts out if you don't get any results.

It might also be a good idea to jot down your observations.



Okay I tried everything you suggested and then some. Still nothing displaying. Te monitor and DVI cable works just fine. And the computer boots I even get the windows chime before you log in.
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a c 124 V Motherboard
a b U Graphics card
September 25, 2013 12:17:04 AM

Windows booting and audible chime suggests GPU; however, if three different GPUs were used on the same mobo, and the same exact results happen in subsequent testing, the two possibilities remain:

1. The GPU in your gf's computer killed her mobo, and then yours when you tried testing it in yours; or
2. coincidentally, all GPUs weren't getting enough power.

One final test would prove which. If at all plausible, I'd see if you can test either your GPU or the newly purchased GPU in known-working (and displaying) computer.
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September 25, 2013 2:11:52 AM

T_T said:
Windows booting and audible chime suggests GPU; however, if three different GPUs were used on the same mobo, and the same exact results happen in subsequent testing, the two possibilities remain:

1. The GPU in your gf's computer killed her mobo, and then yours when you tried testing it in yours; or
2. coincidentally, all GPUs weren't getting enough power.

One final test would prove which. If at all plausible, I'd see if you can test either your GPU or the newly purchased GPU in known-working (and displaying) computer.


I was afraid you would say something like that. I'll test out the new GPU and the one from my rig on my old computer (the one I've been using lately). I just hope the problem hasn't spread to the other GPU's, because then I'll be up the creek without a paddle. I'll post an update first chance I get. Also, the PSUs should have been providing enough power and both computers worked fine until a couple of weeks ago. Hers was only 8 months old and mine was 5 months old.
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