Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Computer in home network causes problems (packet loss?)

Last response: in Networking
Share
Anonymous
September 24, 2013 3:18:42 AM

I have a network of three computers, all with internet access, using a Netgear router. Everytime the "bad" computer (and only the bad computer) is connected to the network, playing online games is almost impossible (in any other task I dont notice anything wrong).

It causes massive amounts rubberbanding/warping, but at the same time, my ping is always 50-60...

I have closed every program and process to no avail, and also interchanged wifi receivers, moved them, etc. Also ran trend micro scans, and some other AV and nothing either.

I ran Netalyzr many times, and sometimes when the problematic computer was on, it showed packet loss.

I have no idea what to do, and while the problem is only evident when gaming, it could be doing worse things without me noticing.

Wireshark IO graph shows this byte length while gaming (right side bad computer connected, left side not) http://imgur.com/82t9RzZ
September 24, 2013 3:59:14 AM

It may fail to work properly because of many different reasons. Try basic network troubleshooting method in different situations, it will help you to recover your home networks.
m
0
l
Anonymous
September 24, 2013 4:14:39 AM

sterlingbmyrick said:
It may fail to work properly because of many different reasons. Try basic network troubleshooting method in different situations, it will help you to recover your home networks.


What basic network troubleshooting methods?
m
0
l
Related resources
a b 2 Internet access
September 24, 2013 6:31:42 AM

Get a copy of wireshark and load it on the bad computer. It takes a lot of skill to really use this tool but to start with you are looking for is to see if it sending lots of garbage traffic into the network when it should be sending nothing at all. You will always see a small amount of data but if the screen fills up faster than you can read it then you have a problem. The other possibility is it has duplicated the IP of another device maybe the router.

It is unclear if you are running all wireless. I would try to test running as much as possible on ethernet cable to see if you have wireless issues or not. Wireless interference is extremely hard to fix....this is why games are never recommended to be played on wireless.
m
0
l
Anonymous
September 24, 2013 8:22:11 AM

bill001g said:
Get a copy of wireshark and load it on the bad computer. It takes a lot of skill to really use this tool but to start with you are looking for is to see if it sending lots of garbage traffic into the network when it should be sending nothing at all. You will always see a small amount of data but if the screen fills up faster than you can read it then you have a problem. The other possibility is it has duplicated the IP of another device maybe the router.

It is unclear if you are running all wireless. I would try to test running as much as possible on ethernet cable to see if you have wireless issues or not. Wireless interference is extremely hard to fix....this is why games are never recommended to be played on wireless.


Yes, I run all wirelessly, and ethernet cable is not an option, too much distance to cover. I have installed wireshark, and ran it without browsers, etc open.

It fills up fast (full screen each 2-4 seconds) mostly with chunks of light blue and green/red. The light blue ones say ARP and Who has 192.168.1.xx? Tell 192.168.1.1.

Hope this helps you help me.

Edit: I also installed wireshark in the other computers, with what looks like the same results... but the only computer that messes up the games is the bad one. There are also a lot of "standard query" entries with the other computers names. Seems like packets are longer when the bad computer is connected.

Wireshark IO graph shows this byte length while gaming (right side bad computer connected, left side not) http://imgur.com/82t9RzZ
m
0
l
!